R
R 3.1.0
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(5) 4.7

Statistical computing and graphics.   Free
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R is a language and environment for statistical computing and graphics. It is a GNU project which is similar to the S language and environment which was developed at Bell Laboratories (formerly AT&T, now Lucent Technologies) by John Chambers and colleagues. R can be considered as a different implementation of S. There are some important differences, but much code written for S runs unaltered under R.

R provides a wide variety of statistical (linear and nonlinear modelling, classical statistical tests, time-series analysis, classification, clustering, ...) and graphical
What's New
Version 3.1.0:

New Features:

  • type.convert() (and hence by default read.table()) returns a character vector or factor when representing a numeric input as a double would lose accuracy. Similarly for complex inputs.
  • If a file contains numeric data with unrepresentable numbers of decimal places that are intended to be read as numeric, specify colClasses in read.table() to be "numeric".
  • tools::Rdiff(useDiff = FALSE) is closer to the POSIX definition of diff -b (as distinct from the description in the man pages of most systems).
  • New function anyNA(), a version of any(is.na(.)) which is fast for atomic vectors, based on a proposal by Tim Hesterberg. (Wish of PR#15239.)
  • arrayInd(*, useNames = TRUE) and, analogously, which(*, arr.ind = TRUE) now make use of names(.dimnames) when available.
  • is.unsorted() now also works for raw vectors.
  • The "table" method for as.data.frame() (also useful as as.data.frame.table()) now passes sep and base arguments to provideDimnames().
  • uniroot() gets new optional arguments, notably extendInt, allowing to auto-extend the search interval when needed. The return value has an extra component, init.it.
  • switch(f, ...) now warns when f is a factor, as this typically happens accidentally where the useR meant to pass a character string, but f is treated as integer (as always documented).
  • The parser has been modified to use less memory.
  • Access the complete release notes.

Version 3.1.0:

New Features:

  • type.convert() (and hence by default read.table()) returns a character vector or factor when representing a numeric input as a double would lose accuracy. Similarly for complex inputs.
  • If a file contains numeric data with unrepresentable numbers of decimal places that are intended to be read as numeric, specify colClasses in more...
Requirements
  • Intel, 64-bit processor
  • OS X 10.6 or later
  • X11 system manager (optional)
  • GNU g77 compiler and tcltk libraries included with the installer



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R User Discussion (Write a Review)
ver. 3.x:
(5)
Your rating: Now say why...
Overall:
(15)

sort: smiles | time
burypromote

-1

Tobit reviewed on 12 Apr 2014
Great software, but take care with "Snow Leopard" download link !!
It exists a "Mavericks" version too ;-)
[Version 3.1.0]


burypromote
+2

+9

Danlfsmith reviewed on 03 Aug 2012
R has revolutionized statistical computing over the last 10 years. Every student of statistics or science today probably needs to learn R. It can be used for amazingly complex analysis, as well as the simple stuff. It has a reputation for being hard to learn, but that's mainly because it's so powerful and flexible. Fortunately there are many good books available to teach R. I like "Introductory Statistics with R," by Peter Dalgaard.
[Version 2.15.1]


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biop090 reviewed on 05 Jan 2012
GREAT!
[Version 2.14.1]


burypromote
+3

+3

Pedroj reviewed on 26 Sep 2010
R is the tool for choice for serious statistical analysis. It's not an easy platform, however, and learning takes some time. The good side is how powerful it is for *any* type of analysis, data, or problem. The help support is very good and user forums are very active and helpful. This is not the package of choice if you are doing sporadic data analysis, but I'd recommend it to anyone seriously involved in statistical analysis. If you are just starting with statistics and plan to keep doing data analysis- go for it. If you are using other packages and statistical analysis is a major part of your study, go for it. No other package offers the versatility and support R has. If the command line mode is really intimidating to you, you can use the R-Commander GUI (just install the Rcmdr package), but the real power of R lies in its command-line. You can run R with the binary cocoa application, from the Terminal, within emacs, or within TextMate.
[Version 2.11.1]

1 Reply

burypromote

+45
Myschizobuddy replied on 05 Jan 2012
and rStudio http://rstudio.org/
burypromote
+2

+11

joachimr reviewed on 24 Mar 2009
Top-notch statistical analysis software for an unbeatable price. You do have to invest some time to learn how to work it, but that's well worth the price of admission. Many statistical tools become available on this platform way before others (much more costly ones). It is supported by a wide, global user and programmer base. Get yourself a book to learn how to use it if you are not the adventurous or "I'd rather do this with a command-line" type.
[Version 2.8.1]


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+2


Anonymous reviewed on 22 Oct 2004
A significant upgrade. The interface is now a lot less baffling. The most immediately-visible changes affect the ease with which you can see what is in your workspace and how easily you can access help files.
R is powerful, but has hitherto been daunting in its minimalist interface. This is still a package for the professional, but is now going to be a lot easier to get to grips with.
[Version 2.0.0]


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+2


Anonymous reviewed on 22 Oct 2004
One of the most robust and powerful statistical package that just happens to be free, as well. Most of its power comes from command line interface, but the object browsers can't hurt. Is it just me or it tends to run a lot faster when run directly from terminal app?
[Version 2.0.0]


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+40
Dorkypants had trouble on 11 Apr 2014
Package installer fails on my 2009 MacBook Pro 13" running Snow Leopard 10.6.8 with all available Software Updates installed
[Version 3.1.0]


burypromote

+15
umijin had trouble on 25 May 2006
I downloaded the package, ran the installer and after starting R, the app remains in 'loading R' status interminably. I have to 'force quit' R to get out of it.

I'm running a 20" G5 iMac with OSX10.4.6

Any idea of what the problem is?
[Version 2.3]

1 Reply

burypromote
-1

+15
umijin commented on 25 May 2006
I rebooted my Mac and R starts up quickly. But the text screen shows several repetitions of:

Error loading /Library/QuickTime/DivX 6 Decoder.component/Contents/MacOS/DivX 6 Decoder:...

Gbisson rated on 18 Feb 2014

[Version 3.0.2]



-1

LeonBe;mont2070 rated on 28 Sep 2013

[Version 3.0.2]



Jmuirhead rated on 27 Sep 2013

[Version 3.0.2]



-1

Tobit rated on 26 Sep 2013

[Version 3.0.2]



Maexchen rated on 25 Mar 2013

[Version 2.15.3]



+9

Davedgd rated on 03 Aug 2012

[Version 2.15.1]



+25

Mrgando rated on 01 Nov 2011

[Version 2.14.0]



+7

Dedalus271 rated on 13 Apr 2011

[Version 2.13.0]


Downloads:53,938
Version Downloads:753
Type:Education : Mathematics
License:Free
Date:11 Apr 2014
Platform:Intel 64 / OS X
Price:Free0.00
Overall (Version 3.x):
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R is a language and environment for statistical computing and graphics. It is a GNU project which is similar to the S language and environment which was developed at Bell Laboratories (formerly AT&T, now Lucent Technologies) by John Chambers and colleagues. R can be considered as a different implementation of S. There are some important differences, but much code written for S runs unaltered under R.

R provides a wide variety of statistical (linear and nonlinear modelling, classical statistical tests, time-series analysis, classification, clustering, ...) and graphical techniques, and is highly extensible. The S language is often the vehicle of choice for research in statistical methodology, and R provides an Open Source route to participation in that activity.

One of R's strengths is the ease with which well-designed publication-quality plots can be produced, including mathematical symbols and formulae where needed. Great care has been taken over the defaults for the minor design choices in graphics, but the user retains full control.


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