PDF Shrink
PDF Shrink
4.9.1

3.8

PDF Shrink free download for Mac

PDF Shrink

4.9.1
24 October 2018

Compress PDF documents.

Overview

PDF Shrink can reduce most PDF files - including those created by Mac OS X iLife and iWork applications, Adobe Creative Suite, Microsoft Word & PowerPoint - by as much as 90% of their original size. PDF Shrink is ideal for consumers and small businesses that need to produce PDFs at a quality and file size appropriate for use on the Web, as email attachments, CD-ROMs and for on-screen reading. The software is compatible with OS X 10.4 and supports PDF Services, droplets, and AppleScript.

Images make up a significant part of the size of typical PDF file. PDF Shrink can modify the resolution and compression level of the images to match different requirements. Fonts can also make PDFs larger than necessary so Shrink allows you to optionally remove embedded "base 14" fonts. Shrink can also delete unused elements such as metadata, thumbnails and duplicated data.

Protect your documents using PDF Shrink's new encryption feature. Prevent unauthorized access by adding a password or restrict use by selecting from several options including whether to allow changes, printing and content extraction. You can even set a different password to prevent unauthorized people from opening the PDF.

Need PDF optimized for a different use? The intuitive new wizard removes the jargon and unfamiliar terms from selecting different configurations to produce PDF optimized for different uses. Just tell the wizard how you plan to use your PDF and Shrink 4 picks the appropriate settings for you. Or use the Advanced mode to directly specify your settings.

PDF Shrink can be used in several different ways - drag-n-drop a PDF to the application icon or Dock, drag-n-drop to a setting, print through PDF Services, create a droplet or use AppleScript.

How much can PDF Shrink reduce the size of my PDF files? PDF files can be created by so many different applications that it is difficult to give one answer. PDF Shrink can reduce most types of PDF files by up to 10% to 90% of their original size.

What's new in PDF Shrink

Version 4.9.1:
  • Fixed an issue corrupting some PDF files created on Mac OS X 10.12

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34 PDF Shrink Reviews

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Rate this app:

Uncoy
30 March 2010

Most helpful

PDF Shrink does the job and does it well. But PDF compression should be built into the OS. It turns out that it is: How-To - http(colon-slash-slash)www(dot)hoboes(dot)com(slash)Mimsy(slash)?ART=360 Apple Discussion Board - http(colon-slash-slash)discussions(dot)apple(dot)com(slash)thread(dot)jspa?messageID=6109445&tstart=0 On the other hand, if you don't have time to tinker with filters, PDF Shrink does the job well. If we went the PDF Shrink route, I'd have to put PDF Shrink on four designer computers so we are building our own filters instead. Plus, core OS filters are likely to be compatible with future OS without updating costs.
Like (2)
Version 4.5.3
Aargl
24 October 2018
Incredible but true! The switch to 64 bits has been done, after 5 years since the last version, and it works perfectly. Thanks! :-)
Like
Version 4.9.1
2 answer(s)
josehill
josehill
26 October 2018
FWIW, PDF Shrink was updated to 64 bits several years ago. For some reason, MacUpdate only just recently updated its version of PDF Shrink to 4.9.1, even though 4.9.1 was released in 2016.
Like
Aargl
Aargl
26 October 2018
Strange indeed! I suppose the dev has to warn MU when an update is available...
Their product page doesn't give a version number and their "What's New" page (http://apago.co/news.php) doesn't mention updates since 2013, I bet these might be good reasons for people ignoring such updates exist. ;-)
Like (1)
josehill
10 June 2018
Although PDF Shrink hasn't seen a major update in a while, it remains my favorite tool for shrinking PDFs. I have Acrobat Pro and a few other PDF tools (including other PDF "shrinkers"), but PDF Shrink routinely seems to give the best combination of speed, compression, and accuracy/quality out of all of them. I've also seen a few cases where PDF files that were not opening correctly in programs like Adobe Reader or Apple Preview worked fine after processing with PDF Shrink. I particularly like the easy-to-use "Droplets," which allow you to save particular settings as mini-apps. Drag and drop a PDF file on a droplet, and it automatically will process the file accordingly.

My only complaint is that the "Check for Updates" command seems to be broken, and the Apago website doesn't make it easy to determine if there is a new version. (You need to enter a name and email address to download the latest version, and then you need to "Get Info" on the downloaded app or actually open the app to see what version it is. FWIW, as of June 2018, the latest version is 4.9.1, released in 2016.)
Like (1)
Version 4.8
I have had PDF Shrink for ages. Now it has disappeared and this site wants $35. I feel like I've been kidnapped and raped. Anyone can help solve this? Thanks
Like
Version 4.8
2 answer(s)
josehill
josehill
10 June 2018
You can download the latest version at the developer's website - http://apago.co/downloads.php
Like
TJLuoma
TJLuoma
25 October 2018
Wow. "Kidnapped and raped"? Really? Because you could not download a piece of software (which was apparently available from its developer's website)? Try getting out into the world and meeting some actual rape victims before you use such gross exaggerations over minor inconveniences.
Like (1)
Aargl
10 February 2018
Amongst all the shrinkers I could try, PDF Shrink is not the best, size wise (Shrinkit is), but it gives you the most compatible output. I'm using a random simple one page pdf for this test: - Shrinkit can give weird characters in Acrobat (probably doesn't store the correct encoding format) - PdfCompress gives an almost blank document in Acrobat (while ok in Skim) - Preview's integrated "reduce size" option alters images As I'm searching for a totally reliable solution for archiving, PDF Shrink is the best I found, though it has not been updated for years and is 32 bits only — making it a poor choice for recent OSes, given its high price.
Like
Version 4.8
1 answer(s)
josehill
josehill
26 October 2018
The current version of PDF Shrink, version 4.9.1, is 64 bit.
Like
Watertownimac
20 December 2015
Got it today after trying several programs to cut down the size of pdfs. This is expensive, but does work very well. FYI - currently running Mac OSX 10.11.2
Like
Version 4.8
Sanchai
24 November 2015
Apago! Are you joking? After downloaded and drag PDF Shrink 4.9 to Applications folder, PDF Shrink refuse to open. When I click to open PDF Shrink, a dialog stated that the app is damaged and should be move to Trash pop up, Are you checking your app before release? My Mac is running 10.11.2 beta 4 Fix immediately please
Like
Version 4.9
2 answer(s)
Ptc
Ptc
24 November 2015
I see the same thing, on a 2015 MacBook with 10.11.1. I also tried a direct download from Apago. Same result. I posted to their support.
Like
Dwight-Kelly-Apago
Dwight-Kelly-Apago
24 November 2015
We have verified that it's a problem with digital signature used to sign the application. It binary is not corrupt and will run if you enable "All applications" to run in Gatekeeper. Working on a fix now.
Like
ScottUpdate
09 June 2014
How is PDF Shrink worth 900% more than PDF Squeezer? It doesn't perform 900% better. And I've found PDF Shrink's "customer service" to be dismissive and rude, not 900% better than PDF Squeezer's. Then today I found out that files reduced by PDF Shrink will get bigger again if re-saved by Apple's Preview app. But PDF Shrink doesn't want you to know that so they never mention it on their website. Arrgh!
Like
Version 4.8
3 answer(s)
Dwight-Kelly-Apago
Dwight-Kelly-Apago
21 October 2014
PDF Shrink uses advanced compression techniques most other PDF applications, such Apple's Preview, do not support. When you save a PDF out of Preview it recompresses the file using its own techniques -- not PDF Shrink's. This is true with any application.
Like
ScottUpdate
ScottUpdate
21 October 2014
Interesting that someone from Apago is finally responding to years of feedback on macupdate.com about PDF Shrink. Also interesting that Dwight Kelly can't say how PDF Shrink is worth 900% more than PDF Squeezer or explain why Apago refuses to let people know that files reduced by PDF Shrink will go back to their larger sizes when opened and re-saved by Apple's Preview. And it's NOT true that this happens with "any application." It doesn't happen when I use PDF Squeezer.
Like
kenbkop
kenbkop
05 December 2014
Well Scott, I have just compared all the various PDF compressors for Mac, and it seems that this particular PDFShrink does indeed make the PDF smaller than any others. PDFSqueezer could only compress a 5.3 MB PDF down to 850K, where this PDFShrink took it down to 500K. This becomes important when sending out thousands of PDFs as email attachments, such as emailing news letters. If this program is using extra-advanced compressing techniques, it makes perfect sense that saving the file again with an inferior compressor (such as that used by Preview) would lead to undesirable effects.

Really, shrinking a PDF down should really be the last thing one does before sending a file for transmission...saving it afterwards kind of misses the point, in my opinion.

As far as price goes, you can't compare cost of the software and percentage of compression. You need to compare the cost with the extra effort required to get that last bit of extra compression. I'm sure you've heard of the 80/20 rule, where it can take 80% of the total effort to get the last 20% of performance. The way that software companies figure out software prices is often based on recovering development costs plus a profit. It could have actually costed thousands of dollars to add the extra compression, so it's really not that hard to understand.

Also, as in many things, such as cars for example, the premium version is often WAY more expensive. For example, a normal car may go up to 100 MPH as a maximum speed, and perhaps cost $20,000. Then if you take a sports car that goes 200 MPH, you may pay $80K to $100K for that car.

Anyhow, I think I've made my points, and hopefully answered your concerns.
Like (1)
Julian-Ko
07 February 2014
The one is the one that does not destroy the page index or the produce the false colors of embedded pictures comparing to the applications under $5.
Like (1)
Version 4.8
Yubben
21 January 2014
I was looking for an application that can reduce the size of my curriculum vitae in PDF format because the website where I wanted to upload it didn't accept pdf file that exceed 200 k.o. I downloaded and tried PDF Shrink along with two other application : PdfCompress and PDF Squeezer and here're the results : PdfCompress : 127 ko PDF Squeezer : 131 ko PDF Shrink : 123 ko PDF Shrink did the best work. The only problem with this application is that it's not very user-friendly comparing to the two other application, you need to tweak with it a little while before mastering it. Not to mention that it is overpriced. It's a very useful tool that I'd buy when it is on sale on MacUpdate.
Like
Version 4.8
c2b
24 May 2013
I disagree with some of the previous comments about ease of use and interface. The interface looks very nice, I didn't find anything complicated about the setup whatsoever. There was an option for dropping the file here for emailing, here for iPhone and iPad use, here for web, etc. and I used those to great success. I literally installed the software, opened it, dropped my first PDF file onto it, PDF Shrink reduced it to a tenth of its former size, and I had my file -- all in about 3 minutes. It was super-easy, super-clear, and super-effective. I haven't tried any of the customizing and have only used it once, but based on this experience I can only lament that I have but two thumbs to put up.
Like
Version 4.5.3
$35.00

3.8

App requirements: 
  • Intel 64
  • OS X 10.8.0 or later
Developer Website: 
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