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PdfCompress Reviews

6.3.3
04 February 2016

Reduce the size of your PDF documents.

dwp-1
17 May 2013

Most helpful

Very expensive software for what it does. PDF Squeezer works great for $4 and you can preview the document prior to committing.
Like (3)
Version 6.3

Read 21 PdfCompress User Reviews

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Aargl
01 May 2018
The best Pdf Compressor I've tried: the lightest resulting files, while respecting the positions in the pdfs (some are compressing more but changing fonts or moving objects).
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Version 6.3.3
Dominikhoffmann
08 February 2016
When I download 6.3.3, the app has a generic icon. Is that just on my system or universal.?
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Version 6.3.3
1 answer(s)
Aargl
Aargl
01 May 2018
Same thing for me but I'm on 10.9.5 (Requirements say OS X 10.10) but it works anyway! :-)
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Tom-25
15 February 2014
Good app, but for 10.6 you should stay with v.6.3.1 . Newest version are 10.7 only.
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Version 6.3.2
welch@cs-unc-edu
11 January 2014
Indispensable for me.
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Version 6.3.2
GeogProf
06 July 2013
Given the modesty of both its task and its output, this is wayyy too expensive and always has been. $4 would be more appropriate — and I’ve held that opinion far longer than I’ve been aware of the existence of PDF Squeezer, which is of like quality (though easier to use) and costs only $3.99. And if that’s the new icon above, I fail to see any improvement over the previous one, which was unmemorable at best.
Like (1)
Version 6.3.1
1 answer(s)
Big Johnson
Big Johnson
29 January 2016
Terrible icon!
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dwp-1
17 May 2013
Very expensive software for what it does. PDF Squeezer works great for $4 and you can preview the document prior to committing.
Like (3)
Version 6.3
J-Khulasphoc
08 November 2011
Extremely fast & easy to use! Output files really do shrink with and the quality is surprisingly good! Nice little powerful program
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Version 6.0.6
Dtruett1
15 June 2011
I'm a teacher and have been using my ScanSnap S1500M to convert a lot of my resource and workbooks to PDF files. Beats running to the copier. Cumulatively, my school folder does grow pretty large. I put this app to work yesterday with great results. For example, I took a 65 page book on writing with lots of graphics and obviously text, which was 37.9 MB. Ran it through PDFCompress and the result was 11.1 MB. Multiplied by the number of these PDF files I have, there will be a huge savings in disk space. Putting the original and the result side by side, the only loss in quality was a very slight amount of contrast and a tiny loss of crispness of text-very slight and acceptable for virtually any PDF I have, and would have been unnoticeable had I not compared out of curiosity. Excellent program.
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Version 6.0
An-onymous
26 October 2009
I got a quick email reply but the demo license code in it did not work. Don't loose your time with people who multiply obstacles to testing their stuff.
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Version 5.7
An-onymous
26 October 2009
After you have downloaded you cannot use the demo immediately. You must send an email and wait for a demo licence. It is much less convenient (and spam proof) than PDFShrink, but it seems thatPDFCompress lets one choose precisely how much the file will be compressed. A thing that PDFShrink does not.
Like
Version 5.7
Getsomesauce
24 February 2009
Just to expound on TFINDLAY's wise words, with Quartz Filters, you can take total control of the compression process. In Leopard (perhaps Tiger or earlier, I'm don't recall), in your Utilities folder you'll find "ColorSync Utility". With this program, you can create you own quartz filters which allow to you compress PDFs as much as you see fit. When you start ColorSync Utility, you'll see how Apple programmed their "Reduce File Size" quartz filter that you see in Preview. It's remarkably easy to make your own filter by modeling it off Apple's filter. Head on over to for a quick tutorial. Also, some nice guy on Apple's Discussion boards put up a bunch of premade filters you can download that do the same thing. A follow-up poster even posted AppleScript code and Automator recommendations to make compressing PDFs a snap! Check out for more on that. Happy PDF-Shrinking!
Like (2)
Version 5.7
1 answer(s)
Getsomesauce
Getsomesauce
24 February 2009
Sorry - here are those two links... How-To - http(colon-slash-slash)www(dot)hoboes(dot)com(slash)Mimsy(slash)?ART=360 Apple Discussion Board - http(colon-slash-slash)discussions(dot)apple(dot)com(slash)thread(dot)jspa?messageID=6109445&tstart=0 Good Luck!
Like (1)
Version 5.7
Rhodee
30 November 2007
Isn't that interesting. One learns a great deal here from just reading the comments. I didn't know about the quartz filter. Tried it on a 492 k doc which reduced to 68k. Bloody amazing. Thanks macupdate and keep up the great job. rhodee
Like (1)
Version 5.6.1
Tfindlay
29 November 2007
Maybe I'm missing something but Preview can reduce PDFs. Open a PDF then choose Save As... Select PDF in the popup menu and select Quartz Filter: Reduce File Size.
Like (2)
Version 5.6.1
Anonymous
03 May 2005
I know another great application for creating small PDFs, suitable for sending via email and the web... It's called DropStuff, it's included in Stuffit Standard, and it's FREE Use the SitX compression with blockmode, optimizers and Compression Via Analysis on, and you'll get nice compact files.
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Version 4.4.3
1 answer(s)
Mark-anderson
Mark-anderson
24 February 2006
Stuffit = Ignorance. 1. Zip file compression is built-in to Tiger, why use a third party tool? 2. Most Windows-based recipients don't have Stuffit on their machines. 3. People want native PDF, not stuffed documents. 4. Stuffing a properly made PDF will result in little or no file size reduction
Like (2)
Version 5.1.1
Anonymous
25 April 2005
pdfCompress is a decent app, but I much prefer PDFshrink -- great preset system. http://macupdate.com/info.php/id/9206
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Version 4.4
Jim Everett
02 November 2004
I find this an indispensible tool for shrinking files to send to clients via e-mail. It is easy to change and optimize settings (if required) for each document. Today, I took a 24 page, 30MB PDF file with text and hi-res pictures, and shrank it to less than 2MB. The smaller file still was good enough to print (including photo insert pics) with decent quality. Never had any problems with stability.
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Version 4.3.1
Anonymous
14 May 2004
Application crashes when i print thru PDF Services. Output is corrupt many times. pdfshrink is a better product imho.
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Version 4.3.1
Anonymous
09 March 2004
A nice program, but watch out choosing the options from the print menu. This has consistently crashed every program I've run this under with OS 10.2.3.
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Version 4.3.1
Ron-West
08 June 2003
Provides functions not avaliable in the "Save As" command prior to Adobe Viewer 6.0.
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Version 4.1.3
Anonymous
08 May 2003
WOW - had a 24 page 12Mb PowerPoint preso, with lots of 200 dpi photos. Saved as regular PDF to share - came up to 32Mb. Bit big for e-mailing! So, with judicious settings, was able to PDF Compress to 1.2Mb, at printable quality!!! Very stable, easy to use, responsive developer.
Like
Version 4.1.2
Brad Knowles
26 November 2002
PDF Compress vs. PDF Shrink Lite -- Has anyone done a detailed comparison of these two products? Testing them both on a few recent PDFs I have generated, PDF Compress munged the output because it wasn't licensed, sometimes created output files that were larger than the originals (perhaps because of the honking big "demo" graphics it puts on every third page), and could not understand the output file format from PDF Shrink Lite. Contrariwise, PDF Shrink Lite created files that were never larger than the originals, were always smaller than the files generated by PDF Compress, and could compress the output of PDF Compress down even further (to about the same size as the originals directly processed by PDF Shrink Lite). It didn't munge my output, although it is only good for 15 days. As far as user interface is concerned, PDF Compress is simpler and less confusing -- drop your PDFs on it, it throws up a little sheet with a barber pole showing you the progress, and then generates the output file (with a different file name by default, so the original isn't lost). PDF Shrink Lite shows that there is a lot more power under the hood, but is more confusing. On UI, PDF Compress wins, hands-down. For actual output, and not munging my test files, PDF Shrink Lite wins. If PDF Compress improved the amount of compression they provided, and arranged for a time-limited demo that did not munge my output files, I would rate them at least one point higher in all categories (where possible).
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Version 3.0
1 answer(s)
Drcecil
Drcecil
15 December 2003
Have you tried the latest versions of both PDF compressors? Do you still prefer pdf shrink over pdf compress?
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Version 4.3