CrossOver
CrossOver
18.5

3.5

CrossOver free download for Mac

CrossOver

18.5
22 March 2019

Run Windows apps on your Mac.

Overview

CrossOver can get your Windows productivity applications and PC games up and running on your Mac quickly and easily. CrossOver runs the Windows software that you need on Mac at home, in the office, or at school without purchasing a Windows license, without rebooting your computer, and without having to use a virtual machine. And CrossOver can run a wide range of Windows software.

Easy Installs! Many Windows titles can be installed using our CrossTie technology. If you have CrossOver installed, and have the installer for your Windows software, simply click the button in our Compatibility Database, and CrossOver will automatically install your application for you!

Note: the price reflected in the listing is for that of a perpetual license. To view other pricing options, please go here.

What's new in CrossOver

Version 18.5:

Note: Currently available for $14.67

Core Technology Improvements:
  • CrossOver 18.5 includes an update to Wine 4.0.
  • Reimplementation of XAudio2 using the FAudio library
Fixed:
  • A bug disrupting the activation status of Office 2010 bottles upgraded from CrossOver 17.x and earlier
  • A bug that caused Office 2010 to attempt and fail configuration on every launch
  • An audio regression that prevented sound from working for some game titles

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134 CrossOver Reviews

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Rate this app:

CFrag
25 February 2014

Most helpful

CrossOver is the for-profit version of WINE (a windows compatibility layer) for Mac and Linux. So you can get the same for free. But paying for CrossOver does have significant advantages: 1) support 2) a much better software package. I should also mention that CodeWeavers is funding the development of WINE, so paying for CO benefits the whole community. So, what does CO do? Basically, it allows you to run Windows software on your Mac in OSX *without* running a full windows emulator like VirtualBox, Parallels or VMWare. That means that you can run Windows software without needing a copy of Windows. Plus, CO has compatibility modules (they call them 'Bottles') for Windows 98, 2000, XP, Vista, and 7. An important, though perhaps under documented, point is that you don't really buy CO - you purchase the right to run the currently recent version, plus all updates for the next 12 Months. After that you may continue to use CO, but you can't update, and you are no longer entitled to support unless you purchase a license extension. For a business these terms are quite acceptable. Private users may not require continued support; yet being able to have the most recent version of CO can be worth the admission fee. Using CrossOver *can* be frustrating, because it assumes you know your way around in the particular brand of Windows your application requires - a presupposition that can prevent you from getting the results you need. If you don't know your way around Windows and the Windows software does not run from the get go (a rarity with old titles), you are pretty much screwed. That's where the service/support subscription comes in, and I've submitted a number of tickets to have them answered within 24 hours. That being said, the customization features of WINE are limited, which is both a boon and a problem if your software requires a particular feature. How well does it work? Well, if you have legacy software that is standard, straight code and you need to access that software or data, it works really, really well. CodeWeaver's site has a compatibility DB where you can check on-line if an application will run; be advised though that this DB isn't always current, and new versions of CrossOver can break compatibility with older software. If you have legacy software that taxed the system at the time (usually games), used DRM, or non-standard graphics (e.g. GLide), results are mixed. I was able, for example, to install Homeworld off the original CD, and could play it - but only in software rendering, and at 640x480x16. But all animations, sounds, and interface worked flawless, at full speed. Many other games, though, didn't run at all (Mechcommander 2 (a Microsoft Title), Ground Control, Red Alert, Independence War), others worked but were unplayable because they did not read input devices correctly (Freespace, Freesapce 2). Other titles ran, but were so old that their usability was null (Tribes, Starsiege) because their infrastructure did no longer exists - not a fault of CO, though. As a general rule of thumb, compatibility increases when the software is younger and starts using Windows-based standard libraries. This continues up to a certain point where the performance trade-off with the WINE-layer (10%-20%) makes the game unplayable. Most productivity software (MS Office, Quicken, Visio) not only runs really well, but because it is officially supported by CodeWeavers, installation is quick and painless. For many other titles that are not officially supported, there are community-provided installers that help you navigate some pitfalls during installation and that makes using CO much, much easier. If you are using Steam, though, CrossOver is a great tool. Many old games work well when downloaded into a steam bottle (they will install into the same 'Bottle' as steam), and this way you gain access to many classic game titles that are otherwise unavailable on the Mac. Newer steam titles work, but the newest usually don't because of performance issues. Older titles usually work well, but may require you to install an obscure Windows library - without CO support I would not have been able to do so. that way, I was finally able to play 'Far Cry', 'Nexus: The Jupiter Incident' and 'Sins of a Solar Empire' on OSX. So, is it worth it? If you have a legacy app and need to access or import windows data, then it is definitely worth a shot (you have a trial period to see if it works), and well worth the price if it works. It's much cheaper to than to spring for a full Windows emulation plus Windows, and you can switch between windows versions. For me, it's a great help, and the cost for service is negligible compared to what I would need to pay had I used a Windows PC and some Windows expert to keep it running. And if you want to play some classic titles that are available on Steam, it's definitely worth a try.
Like (24)
Version 13.1
xgman
22 March 2019
Still needs fully 64 bit capable fix.
Like
Version 18.5
Derekcurrie
22 March 2019
Some perspective about CrossOver: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wine_(software)#CrossOver CrossOver is a contributor to the Wine (WINE) open source project. As such, their actual Wine code is incorporated into Wine software, which of course is accessible for free. You can also access CrossOver code via their free contribution to the Darwine open source project. When BUYING CrossOver, what you're getting, in addition to Wine, is their added GUI and other ease-of-use code that makes it significantly easier and more enjoyable to use than straight Wine. The money you pay to CrossOver goes into their further development contributions to the Wine project as well as updating their ease-of-use code. It's important to note that Wine is VERY limited in what Windows software it is able to run, despite how promising it sounds when you read about it. This is particularly true of games, which tend to be what Mac users would like to access from the Windows environment. With time, this has become a more prominent limitation of Wine thanks to Microsoft managing to push proprietary APIs to their Windows game developers, resulting in them NOT being available to incorporate into Wine. DirectX is of particular annoyance. Even virtualization systems are unable to provide contemporary DirectX 11 or 12 support. This has been the case for many years. DirectX 10 is now relatively antiquated. There is some glint of promise in Wine version 4.0 in that it provides some support of DirectX 11 code. With time and testing we'll find out how well it works. Wine 4.0 is of course incorporated into the most current version of CrossOver.
Like (2)
Version 18.5
durrantcolin
09 March 2019
Uninstalling because none of the applications for windows open I can install but attempting to open just crashes out the window app I am trying to open.
Like
Version 18.1
xgman
03 November 2018
5 stars IF it is 64 bit compatible. But it is not! With a brand new version and I get a "this app is not optimized" message from OSX Mojave? Really? Heading into 2019 soon I think they could have gone ahead and made this app fully 64. geeze!
Like (1)
Version 18.0
3 answer(s)
Marko85
Marko85
10 December 2018
To be fair to developers, you should actually do some research before criticizing them for something like that. The purpose of the app is to enable you to run 32-bit Windows software. Many Windows apps/games do not have 64-bit versions and many older games probably aren't going to get new 64-bit versions. If you intend to run 32-bit Windows software, that software obviously needs to have 32-bit support because it will not work in 64-bit mode. If Apple removes support for 32-bit software for some reason, then the app would have to find some other way to provide 32-bit support for that 32-bit Windows software because it can't just make old 32-bit Windows software run in 64-bit mode without requiring any 32-bit support. I just hope that Apple would still allow 32-bit software to work if the app can provide it with it's own 32-bit libraries or something like that, that they wouldn't just prevent anything that contains 32-bit code from running.
Like (1)
napabar
napabar
30 March 2019
Marko85 has no idea what he's talking about. The macOS application doesn't not have to stay 32-bit to run 32-bit Windows app under WINE. It's just the front end.
Like (1)
Marko85
Marko85
08 September 2019
@napabar I know very well what I'm talking about and you can go on Wine forums and check their discussions about it. Catalina requires whole app to be 64-bit for it to run, it can't rely on 32-bit libraries in the background to run... and Wine is not a "Virtual Machine" with an entire OS running under it separately
Like
Version 18.5
Michael-Vilain
10 May 2018
Tried running Forte Agent with it and it would not connect to the network while Forte did fine on Windows 7 in a VM. Bought a promotion from 3rd party site and it can't be upgraded. They want more money even though the version I bought didn't work. Now I installed Python 2.7.15 from the python.org site and it totally breaks Crossover. Support says Reinstall the OS. Glad I didn't give them any more money. This goes straight into the trash. A waste of my money.
Like (1)
Version 17.5
ben-marko
30 April 2018
It's ok. It works well enough, but with MS Office and Acrobat Pro, it is slow and clunky. These are the latest versions, too - and there are bizarre graphics issues such as lines and jagged triangle-like shapes that bisect the screen. And there is significant lag associated with kernel_task spiking whenever CrossOver is running.
Like
Version 17.1
hotmac
07 February 2018
I bought CrossOver in a promotion and found out that it was a one-time license. Now, four weeks later, there is an update that I can't install because I need a 1 year license or a lifetime license to install the update. In my opinion this is fraud, because the current update mainly fixes bugs. I'm not gonna back this subscription crap. Codeweaver, you lost me as a customer! By the way, it is advertised that Office 2016 works with v17. But it doesn't! CrossOver crashes, freezes, slows down the computer....
Like (5)
Version 17.1
2 answer(s)
Michael-Vilain
Michael-Vilain
10 May 2018
I had the same problem. and decided I'm not giving them any more money. It didn't work for the purpose I paid for that version and the 3rd party site wouldn't refund my money.
Like
Jack75
Jack75
13 May 2018
I bought it directly to Codeweavers $40 for a day life licence. Same for Vuescan and Koingo softwares.
You get what you pay for. In bundles you get only outdated versions or softwares lacking of business. This is why prices are often low. It can be good anyway to test softwares or because the available version is enough for the usage we are needing.
Office 2016 works I am running Access. But for the normal office, the Mac version is now similar with the Microsoft one.
Like (2)
mamunguia2011
04 January 2018
I feel like I wasted my time and feel frustrated. CrossOver in my opinion is a scam. It crashes often. Some software does not work properly. I wish I could get my money back. The two software I tried to run were Quicken Deluxe for Windows 2016 and Steam. These two don't work.
Like (2)
Version 17.0.0
1 answer(s)
ben-marko
ben-marko
08 May 2018
Most likely any graphics-intensive application won't run well under Crossover. I found this out the hard way myself. So Steam is better run under macOS. This software isn't a scam - it just isn't particularly good. And that says a lot.
Like
Cowicide
03 January 2018
Version 17 killed my Escape Goat game. Won't launch at all. Had to revert back to version 16.x to get it working again. Doesn't seem like much of an upgrade when less apps work afterwards.
Like
Version 17.0.0
2 answer(s)
Janichsan
Janichsan
05 February 2018
Why do you use Crossover for this game? It has a native Mac (and Linux) version.
Like
Cowicide
Cowicide
09 February 2018
Janichsan, because I purchased it for Windows and also want to use it on Mac without paying for it twice.

Also, this has nothing to do with the fact 17 broke an app that was working fine in previous Crossover version.
Like (1)
HelmotV
06 December 2017
I prefer Parallels Desktop after testing this software.
Like (1)
Version 17.0.0