Hibernate
Hibernate
1.00

5.0

Hibernate free download for Mac

Hibernate1.00

16 September 2007

Enable hibernation on your Mac.

Overview

Hibernate preference pane will enable set switch between different sleep states on your Mac:

  • sleep
  • hibernate & sleep
  • hibernate
If you own and PPC Mac with 1GHz or more chances are good that Hibernation will work on your machine. Some machines do need the NVRam patch. That means that there are some values then stored in the no-volatile ram of the computer to say it's hibernate capable. When the os boots up it checks for those values. The software currently tests for machines>=1 GHz to enable NV-Ram patching. It is known that some machines don't sleep at all, some won't start up their fans when hibernation is enabled. In case something goes wrong disable hibernation by resetting the NV-Ram (Hold down CMD-ALT-P-R when booting).

In any case use this software at own risk. There might be a reason why apple enables hibernation only on newer machines.

What's new in Hibernate

Version 1.00:
  • Now works correctly with Intel Mac enabling to use JUST Sleep on Intels.

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How would you rate Hibernate app?

13 Reviews of Hibernate

Anonymous
24 November 2005
Version: 0.8 BETA

Most helpful

Wow... nice idea, but I wonder which crazy people are beta-testing this....
(0)
5
Christefano
17 September 2007
Version: 1.0
Excellent utility. It's working beautifully on our PowerBook G4 (a server with hibernation turned on) and MacBook Pros (our main workstations with hibernation turned off).
(0)
Sjj-public
05 December 2005
Version: 0.81
It's important to note that in order for this feature to actually be functional, you must have more free disk space than you have RAM. I forget the exact amount more, but 1.5*RAM worth of disk space should work. This disk space must be available when you reboot after applying the NVRAM patch - making free space after rebooting won't help, until you reboot again. Moreover, you should really make substantially more than 1.5*RAM available, because you're going to lose all that disk space when the hibernate cache is created at startup - you don't want to end up with a disk with dangerously low free space! So I'd suggest making more like 1.5*RAM + 1 GB free space before applying the patch. Ex: if you have 1 GB of RAM, then make sure there is at least 1.5*1+1 = 2.5 GB of free disk space before applying the patch and rebooting. When you come back up you'll find you have only about 1 GB of free space left.
(0)
Sjj-public
05 December 2005
Version: 0.81
I think this is useful in "Sleep and hibernate" mode, but the value of always hibernating seems questionable to me. Having had it in always-hibernate mode for a week or two now, I ended up switching to sleep-and-hibernate. I have not timed it, but I would estimate that shutting down and powering back up, especially with 10.4's extensive caching, is just as fast as going to hibernate and back, at least on my 2 GB RAM, 1.5 GHz PowerBook G4. Plus shutting down has the advantage of giving you a clean slate to work with at the next power up and you have the option of a quick sleep/wake when needed. If you set your powerbook to always hibernate, then you lose that quick sleep/wake capability. The as-long-as-full-startup restore from hibernate mode takes away most, if not all, of the advantage of sleep mode, and hibernate mode, like sleep mode, can't be trusted - you should save open documents before using it. Given that they are saved, there is little advantage to hibernate mode versus shutting down, since after a normal powerdown/startup you can just open the saved documents and be where you left off. Moreover, shutting down reminds you to save unsaved documents, so it is inherently safer. If hibernate mode were nearly as fast as normal sleep, then it would hold an advantage over sleep, but since it is so slow, its value as as sleep replacement, as opposed to a supplement, is highly questionable. As a supplement, however, for when your powerbook/ibook accidentally loses power while asleep... that can be useful. It may prove to save ones bacon some day. So set it for "Sleep and hiberate" mode, and use shutdown, not hibernate mode, when you want to minimize power drain.
(0)
Anonymous
26 November 2005
Version: 0.81
Seems promising, maybe it just doesn't work on my Mac, although i have read reports of it working on other 1GHz TiBooks. Any hints?
(0)
Show comment (1)
5
Anonymous
26 November 2005
Version: 0.81
What a beautiful piece of software, i was a little scared to try the manual approach that has been floating around, and knew that some fine person would put a GUI on it. So far i've only tested this on a 1.2GHz 12" iBook, every thing seeems to work fabulously. I especially like how it only boots from the disk image if the battery dies, this speeds up the wake up process. Well done!
(0)
4
Anonymous
25 November 2005
Version: 0.81
Works perfect, but I still dont use it. Why ? The iBook-Dual-Screen is not working or is there anything, i did wrong ?
(0)
Show comment (1)
Anonymous
25 November 2005
Version: 0.81
Seems to work as promised - on rev A, 17Al. Success, thanks.
(0)
Anonymous
25 November 2005
Version: 0.81
What is the difference between "Hibernate" and "Sleep" mode?
(0)
Show comment (1)
ianianianian
25 November 2005
Version: 0.8
I tried installing this on my 1.2 ghz G4 iBook and it wouldn't let me, stating that my processor is too slow. Should this actually be the case? I know it says > 1.2 ghz is required, but it seems to make more sense to say >= 1.25 ghz, or something, because people (including myself) tend to assume it means greater than 1.2 ghz inclusive is required.(assuming, of course, that it is actually > 1.2 ghz that is required, and not simply a bug)
(0)
Show comment (1)
Anonymous
24 November 2005
Version: 0.8
The reason it says use at your own risk is because the hibernate function of 10.4.3 is only supposed to be used in Apple's new laptops. In theory it should work on every mac with 10.4.3, but as you can see, it doesn't work perfectly on non-new laptops (fans malfunctioning etc.).
(0)
Show comment (1)
Vitalis
24 November 2005
Version: 0.8 BETA
note to developer, it DOESN'T destroy your hardware!!! Hibernation is all software related! If a bad hibernate image keeps booting then crashing reboot the mac holding down Command-Option-O-F to get in to Open Firmware. Type: setenv boot-image Hit return, then enter: boot
(0)
Show comment (1)
littledude6868
24 November 2005
Version: 0.8 BETA
I've used hibernation but when you put it that way who the hell is gonna want something that says USE AT YOUR OWN RISK?
(0)
Show comments (3)
Anonymous
24 November 2005
Version: 0.8 BETA
Wow... nice idea, but I wonder which crazy people are beta-testing this....
(0)
Free

5.0

App requirements: 
  • Intel 32
  • PPC 32
  • Mac OS X 10.4.11 or later

Downloaded & Installed 13,536 times

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