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http://www.macupdate.com/download/41879/osxupd10.8.5.dmg
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Apple OS X Mountain Lion is the latest release of the world's most advanced desktop operating system. Mountain Lion includes over 200 new features to update your Mac into the best computing experience yet. With the new Messages app you can send text, photos, videos, contacts, Web links, and documents to anyone using another Mac, iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch -- you can even start a conversation on one device and continue it on another. The new Share button makes it easy to share files, Web pages, photos, and videos, as well as tweet right from the app you are using. With the Reminders app you can create to-do lists and alerts more...

What's New

Version 10.8.5:
  • Fixes an issue that may prevent Mail from displaying messages
  • Improves AFP file transfer performance over 802.11ac Wi-Fi
  • Resolves an issue that may prevent a screen saver from starting automatically
  • Improves Xsan reliability
  • Improves reliability when transferring large files over Ethernet
  • Improves performance when authenticating to an more...

Requirements

OS X 10.8.4 or later

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OS X Mountain Lion User Discussion

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Most Helpful Reviews...

MacUpdate most helpful reviews user icon

Very smooth update.

Mountain Lion has been very fast and stable on my machine. The only exception—and this seems to only be related to my user login, and not others on this mac—is a very long wait after the desktop loads, before I more...

3 people found this review helpful
Version 10.8.5
MacUpdate most helpful reviews user icon
from Palmharbor

Apple is still consumed with sending pictures etc between iphone, ipad, imac...this is for the teens but what about improving BASIC functions like apple mail...on line, off line at will...copy/paste not updated since OS 7 in the 1990's etc. I more...

5 people found this review helpful
Version 10.8.3
Sort by: Time | Smiles
LeeL7158 Member IconReview+5
LeeL7158
+0

One more thing Mountain Lion 10.8.5(not earlier versions)
is the Best.. I used Ethernet for download.. and yes it took
a while.. but worth it. If you're not sure, then Don't!
I upgraded from SnowLeopard 10.6.8.. using my Time
machine from 10.6.8.. keeping both my Pic, Docs, and
Most Apps from SnowLeopard.. LL

Reply0 replies
Version 10.8.5
LeeL7158 Member IconReview+5
LeeL7158
+0

Mountain Lion v10.8.5, has got to be the BEST
since Snow Leopard.. I'm very Pleased with
most everything about this OS!
YES, the download is worth every penny !
the download has a habit of stalling in App Store..
I Hit ComMand-R.. and it continued fine.
it took about 9 1/2 hours, but that's just me.
Thank You apple!

Reply0 replies
Version 10.8.5
Penguirl Member IconReview+1062
Penguirl
+0

Oveall I think that Cougar has a lot of nice touches. I still miss Rosetta, and the drab Finder sidebar is atrocious (I find it harder to spot what I'm looking for than SL's sidebar) but overall it's a lot better than I expected.

One thing I sorely miss, besides Rosetta, is the zero-out option in Disk Utility. With this option gone how are we supposed to write out bad sectors now?

Reply0 replies
Version 10.8.5
Brooklyn_Al Member IconComment+177
Brooklyn_Al
+1

The combo updater on the link provided below has a file size of ~ 871mb verses 831mb from the apple support website (http://support.apple.com/kb/DL1676). Why the file size difference?

Reply3 replies
Version 10.8.5
MacUpdate-Jess
+3

Hey, Brooklyn_Al! Glad you asked about the file-size difference, 'cause it's one of my pet peeves. :-)

Back around the age of OS X 10.6, Apple decided that we needed to use decimal kilobytes and megabytes and gigabytes (oh, my!) rather than the mathematically correct binary versions of same. That means that, in Apple's wisdom, on our systems anyway, a kilobyte is 1000 bytes rather than 1024 bytes (2^10 [two to the tenth power] = 1024). As you can imagine, as numbers grow, the difference grows, um, well, logarithmically.

The download, whose uncontested size is 871,498,431 bytes, looks like

871,498,431/1,000,000 is 871.498431 MB or 871.5 MB when it gets to our machines, but

871,498,431/(2^20) is 831.1256704 MB or 831.13 MB is the size in binary, and that's the way Apple posts it on their servers.

So, we apologize for the confusion. And I apologize for the math class, but I had to get it out of my system. :-D

Brooklyn_Al
+1

Jess thanks for the explanation---very helpful and informative!

Prince_Isaac
+1

@MacUpdate-Jess
No problems with the math lesson. I'll wager that 98% of the people who are basically computer-literate (myself included) either weren't aware of the change or simply forget about difference in notation. Thanks for getting this mini-lecture out of your system.

MacUpdate-Lon Member IconComment+557
MacUpdate-Lon
+2

Well, I took the plunge and upgraded my late 2011 MBP running OS X 10.7.5 to OS X 10.8.5. The App Store experience was not good as far as downloading goes, the download quit several times and an alert window popped up that gave an option to "retry". It took the better part of a day to get this beast downloaded (yes, I have broadband). As for the OS itself, I'm not so crazy about it. More bells and whistles, seems to me.

Reply3 replies
Version 10.8.5
Doconmac
+1

Did you use an Ethernet or Wi-Fi connection for the download?
Apple are very specific in recommending ethernet over Wi-Fi as the former is much more stable. I have never had any drop outs since adopting this advice from AppleCare

MacUpdate-Lon
+0

I did indeed use Wi-Fi to download it, was unaware of Apple's recommendation to use Ethernet. Thanks for the tip. The OS has given me no problems. I'm still not excited about it and don't like that it eats a lot more RAM. Oh well, every major Mac OS X update has eaten more RAM, so no surprise.

MacUpdate-Lon
+0

After some use, I have to say that OS X 10.8.5 shouldn't be installed on Macs with less than 8 GB of RAM. I've got 4 GB RAM and I get swapfiles galore after a relatively short time of use, and I don't use any monster apps like Photoshop.

Gregm Member IconComment+213
Gregm
+0

Lost all of my iCloud services mail failed, calendar & address book would not sync, -- even trying to log on via browser failed.

Solution was to log off of iCloud via System Preferences>>Internet and Wireless>> iCloud> sign out --- then sign back in (being mindful of the service checkmarks)

Reply0 replies
Version 10.8.5
Mcr Member IconComment+180
Mcr
+10

My pointers for OS system upgrades. These should be fairly obvious and logical, but surprisingly I see and hear of people who will try to run an upgrade, with 5 apps running, downloading files, and so on, then wonder/complain that the upgrade 'screwed up' my system.

1. Perform Verify Disk AND Repair Permissions BEFORE upgrade.
2. Boot from another partition or drive, other than the one being upgraded. This ensure the partition to be updated is completely accessible and no files are open or in use. In this day and age of inexpensive supersize hard drives, there's no reason not to have an extra partition to boot from for situations like this. It doesn't take much space. A bare bones install of Mountain Lion will fit on a 10 GB partition. What's 10GB on a 500 GB or 1 TB drive? Disconnect all other external drives/unmount other partitions, other than one you booted from and the one to be updated.
3. If unable to boot from another partition or drive (i.e. you are updating the same installation you booted from), then before starting the installation, shut down all apps, including any of the apps that run on the menu bar if you can. (us old Windows people will remember the old saying about quitting all TSR - Terminate and Stay Resident- programs before doing any Windows updates, this is kind of the same thing, turn off all those third party apps running in the background). Go have some coffee while the upgrade is in progress, really you don't need to be working at the same time, those 15 minutes are small compared to the time you will waste if the install goes bad.
4. Perform Verify Disk AND Repair Permissions AGAIN AFTER the upgrade finishes and the system reboots.
5. I run the Combo updater, even if I'm just upgrading from one point release to another. For newbies, Apple releases OS updates in two forms, 1) a smaller update that updates from the immediate prior release, like if you have 10.8.4 installed and want to upgrade to 10.8.5, and 2) a combo updater that updates any prior version. For example the 10.8.5 combo updater will update any version from 10.8.0, .1 , .2, .3 and .4. Why run the combo, even if just upgrading from the previous point release? There have been times when Apple has forgotten files in the point upgrade, and the point upgrade is based on just covering the delta between the two points releases. The combo makes no such assumptions and includes all files changed since the dot zero release, and during the upgrade, a simple date/time and version check tells the updater whether to copy over or not.

When you consider that OS X has HUNDREDS of THOUSANDS of files, the possibility of human error in packaging when applying cumulative point release updates on top of each other is likely higher, versus a combo which makes no assumptions about what got changed in between. I do not have any proof of that, this is a personal opinion, I could be wrong, but in my experience I have had good results always using the combo. Besides if you read any of the Mac publications and tech pundits, nearly all of them recommend using the combo as well.

If you have multiple Macs, or work in a multi Mac shop, it's also a lot simpler to keep one combo updater on hand, than multiple point updaters.

Hopefully, if you follow these steps it will minimize the possibility of those spurious, hard to pin down, system hick ups that are often reported here.

Lastly, laptop users with smaller drives that feel they can't afford to set aside 10 GB for a boot partition, invest in an external drive, it's well worth it. If you have a Time Machine drive, you can even partition off 10GB on that.

Good Luck!

Reply6 replies
Version 10.8.5
Prince_Isaac
+1

@mcr: It's astounding that a couple of people have given you "frownies" for this great set of upgrade tips. What's not to like about what you wrote? I'm an old-time Mac user and remember these tips being written in stone in the System 6 and 7 days, with additional steps once the Mac was unix-based. Thanks for taking the time to put these in the comments here.

Anon-Bud
+0

FWIW: Maybe I'm just lucky, but I quit doing all this sort of thing with each incremental update. I've not had any hint of a problem with software updates and things run as smoothly as can be.

I am not suggesting that folks don't go through what you've listed here. All good stuff. It's just that I only do this with major updates.

BTW I'm running on an early spring 2009 17-inch Macbook Pro.

Doconmac
+0

I boot into Recovery Partition, run Disk Utility Disk First Aid and then boot into Safe Mode to install either the Combo or the smaller Update. As mentioned in an earlier post, Apple recommend an ethernet over Wi-Fi connection for the large 4+ GB download. Since adopting this method I have had no problems at all. I prefer the Combo updater to use for all my Macs.

Tim27
+0

While this is a good list of what to do for OS updates, it clearly outlines the major problem with all operating systems today and for the past 30 years. Humans that program these OS's don't think about the end user. Jobs did to an extent, but still we as customers are left with trying to do all these steps manually before a software update that Apple tells us is available and has a "Click Here to Update" button flashing us in the face.

I am unsure why it would be so incredibly difficult for programmers to automatically do all of these steps before installing an update. And while I think about it, WHY should we have to do these steps anyway? You would think that by the year 2014 computers could optimize their own hard drives and rebuild their own permissions when they become frazzled.

And speaking of permissions, why do I need to rebuild permissions when I am the ONLY person using my computer? Why would permissions even get screwed up?

All of this comes down to making the best possible user experience. To date, no computer company has done it. Some day some company will. I had high hopes for BeOS when that was in development in the 90s, but then that got canned.

Prince_Isaac
+0

@Tim27: You are absolutely correct on all points. Upgrading an OS should not have to entail so many steps of caution, much of which smacks of ritual and voodoo based on nothing more than memories of past horrifying experiences.

An upgrade, not matter what its magnitude is, should consist of the user answering one question: "Do you want to install the upgrade?" Answering "yes" directs the installer to do everything from repairing permissions, cleaning out the .trashes and other detritus, backing up to whatever medium you've selected as your backup, an fsck and other CLI diagnostic/repairs, reset PRAM and whatever else, and then put everything possible into a quiescent state, and install the upgrade. And flash a message every so often that it's time to stop staring at the progress bar and get a life, say in the nearest coffee shop.

Did someone mention the dark arts of chaining SCSI devices and terminators? Something i'd really like to forget.

Prince_Isaac
+0

Somewhat off topic but since we're discussing upgrading, what the heck!

I plan on upgrading to Mavericks when it is released. This will be the first upgrade on my current Mac (late 2012 Mini). I usually upgrade by backing up (with SuperDuper or CCC), then booting into the backup, then erasing my normal boot volume, and installing clean with migration.

However, this time I'm faced with a different setup: My normal boot volume is a 240MB SSD combined with a 500GB HDD, "combined" as in they are a Fusion Drive (not a hybrid).

So I'm curious if anyone here has experience cleaning off a Fusion setup and then installing the OS clean? What are the things to watch out for?

Thanks!
-PI

freddyfrog Member IconReview+1
freddyfrog
+1

Apple need to fix Software Update.
Every time I try to use it to update OSX it grinds slowly away for a short while and then gives up the ghost and declares a fault.
I suspect that the Software Updater cannot handle the load on it.
I find it is far faster to download updaters for OSX directly from the Apple download site.

Reply0 replies
Version 10.8.5
Rtouris Member IconReview+6
Rtouris
+0

Is it **just** me or is the Finder window zoom-to-fit function **still** broken in 10.8.5? I've been sending out feedback reports to Apple with regards to this particular issue (i.e. Finder windows DO NOT ZOOM properly when viewing contents in list-mode cmd-2) ever since 10.7, but oh my..this is getting lots of Apple M$-like love for the last couple of years now :/Other than that, pretty stable and all.

Reply0 replies
Version 10.8.5
Esquare Member IconReview+11
Esquare
+1

Smooth upgrade, no apparent issues on rMBP (2012).

Reply0 replies
Version 10.8.5
user icon+0
Brian Kann
Version 10.8.5
user icon+0
DrWayne
Version 10.8.5
user icon+67
Jmsuijkerbuijk
Version 10.8.5
user icon+74
Josh C.
Version 10.8.5
user icon+91
Gary_box
Version 10.8.4
user icon+0
TShan
Version 10.8.4
user icon+198
Ikir
Version 10.8.4
user icon+276
Titanium1
Version 10.8.4
user icon+0
Hyerstay
Version 10.8.4
user icon+0
AnthonySulli8836
Version 10.8.4
> 4 144

Ratings

Overall
(144)
Current Version (10.x)
(144)

Details

Downloads 150,638
Version Downloads 42,789
Type Utilities / System
License Updater
Date 12 Sep 2013
Platform Intel 64 / OS X / Intel 32
Price $19.99
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