SuperCal
SuperCal
1.2.5

3.3

SuperCal free download for Mac

SuperCal

1.2.5
21 November 2016

Visual display calibrator.

Overview

SuperCal is a visual display calibrator capable of measuring and correcting most conventional displays, including LCDs, CRTs, and projectors. SuperCal doesn't require any hardware measurement devices - only your eyeballs - yet it can be much more accurate, based on how well you pay attention to what you're doing :).

Nearly all existing calibrators assume that you have a display that behaves like the textbook ideal CRT. They don't consider the fact that LCDs don't behave like CRTs at all, nor the fact that most displays have flaws. This is where SuperCal comes in. SuperCal lets you accurately measure the response of any display and build a profile with a corrected gamma table that improves the appearance of your display. When your display is properly calibrated, you'll notice much smoother tonal gradations and cleaner-looking anti-aliased text.

SuperCal was designed to provide the most accurate calibration possible without the use of a hardware measurement device. Very few users can afford to purchase a hardware calibration device, but all users need a properly calibrated display, whether they are retouching digital images or shopping for clothing on the internet.

What's new in SuperCal

Version 1.2.5:

Note: Now requires OS X 10.7 or later

  • Several bug fixes for compatibility with OS X 10.11 and macOS 10.12
  • Fixed crashing bug in certain cases when attempting to save a profile

7 SuperCal Reviews

Rate this app:

Funkboy
18 April 2005

Most helpful

I've used this with at least four different Macs, if not a few of my friends and other computers - I've finally decided it's time to purchase it. I've used it on an iBook G3 (dual USB), iMac G4 17" flat panel, iBook G4 (both iBooks are 12"), and most recently a Dell 1704FP with my new Mac Mini. Every time the color response and display appearance is highly improved, and with my new flat panel it's done it again. Thank you for such a great utility! The only things I could suggest as improvements are a slightly lower price (for $15 I would have purchased it a time or two earlier), and maybe... um... any other color tests? I have no idea, it sure looks good though.
Like (1)
Version 1.1.4
chrisa7132
08 March 2016
Used to be awesome. No longer works on OS X 10.11 . Paid $20 for this software and wish I had just pirated it! No longer supported and emails go unanswered! Terrible! This once was my favorite piece of software too.
Like
Version 1.2.4
1 answer(s)
Brock-Brandenberg
Brock-Brandenberg
07 July 2016
Chrisa 7132, I have just now resolved a major issue with 10.11 El Capitan that results in gray measurement patterns on some MacBooks and iMacs. As it turns out, it is not our code but rather the automatic brightness adjustment in the Displays pane in the System Preferences. Apple apparently made a change to this feature that manipulates a behind-the-scenes gamma table (or LUT) which in turn affects SuperCal. If you turn off automatic brightness for the duration of the calibration, SuperCal should function properly. I don't know yet what effect Apple's manipulation will have on the display's response after calibration, but you can always leave the automatic brightness control switched off to negate its effect.

Also, I apologize if you emailed and did not get a response. I do respond to every email I receive, although not always the same day. And sometimes emails get blocked, as I sometimes run into when responding to users.
Like (1)
w i n t e r m u t e
18 October 2015
Wow! Fantastic! I have a Datacolor Spyder 3 Pro hardware calibrator that I've used with both the default Datacolor software and the dispcalGUI software. The Spyder 3 Pro cost a very pretty penny and the default software is buggy, generating errors. The dispcalGUI software works a bit better with the Spyder and gives better results than the native Datacolor software, but also takes two and a half hours to run. SuperCal does a much better job of calibrating my monitors than the Spyder with both of those software packages, giving much more accurate results and is much faster than running dispcalGUI. I wish I had found this software much sooner, I could have saved a ton of money and a lot of time and received much better results, too! Highly recommended. My secondary display is a cheap Princeton LCD that I could never get anywhere close to accurate... either the highlights were blown out or the white balance had a noticeable color tint. SuperCal is the only thing that fixed this problematic display. And I was almost going to toss out that old display and spend several hundred dollars on a new one. The best $19 I've spent in years.
Like
Version 1.2.4
Rpsx
08 September 2009
i had super high hopes for this, as i find the built in apple calibration to be pretty lacking... loved the process, everything going smooth, until i get to step 9, and at that point, the monitor jumps to some crazy settings and gets all purplish. i am a graphic design, so i think my eye is pretty good - not sure what went wrong. did it twice with the same results. also, app seems pretty unstable on 10.5 - i clicked out of the app to the desktop then clicked back in - i could page through the steps, but not actually access the main content! including saving. everything stayed grayed out. hope this app gets updated, as if it did work, would be fantastic. maybe i will bet a hardware calibrator now.
Like
Version 1.1.4
5 answer(s)
Lunelson1
Lunelson1
24 May 2011
Actually I am having this same issue with version 1.2.0 on OS 10.6.7 with a new MBP 2011 15" Antiglare screen. Dunno if it is OS or graphics card related or what. I used to have great results with Supercal in the Tiger days but this bug between step 8 and 9 is a show stopper unfortunately
Like
Lunelson1
Lunelson1
24 May 2011
Actually disregard that previous post. The developer has explained what's going on: it's only at Step 9 that the new profile is pushed to the card, so that's actually when you are seeing it for the first time. It jives with how I remember using it before and I think this is rather a difficulty with the screens on MacBook Pros
Like
Bergdesign
Bergdesign
11 August 2011
What you are seeing when the color shifts at this step, is the native behavior of your display. That is, the video card gamma table is finally updated at this step with the results of your measurements and you are now seeing the native response of your screen. Just for reference, the LED-backlit LCDs are horribly blue in color, so it takes a significant white balance shift to color-correct them. If you have a MacBook Pro and you open the ColorSync Utility and pick the default "Color LCD" display profile, then open the profile and examine the 'vcgt' tag in the profile, you will see a significant bend in the blue channel, and this is the Apple profile you're looking at. Note that when you do a white balance adjustment in SuperCal, you may have to significantly change the color balance to neutralize the grays and make it look correct, but this is normal and entirely expected. Also, a significant difference between a SuperCal profile and the default Apple profile is that SuperCal will change the actual white point to favor color correctness while Apple seems to leave white at 100% intensity to favor brightness.
Like
Rpsx
Rpsx
17 March 2012
okay, fine. that is the native behavior of my screen (NEC multisync LCD, btw). but... what's the point of that? i spend 15-20 minutes crafting a great calibration (that i assume is supposed to correct white balance, etc), then it disappears? highly confusing from a user perspective, and you give no suggestions on what i am supposed to do to correct things at or after step 9.
Like
ronaldpr
ronaldpr
25 July 2012
What you need to do in step 9 is described in the three-step instructions given in step 9. Here you adjust the white balance. You do this in the test pattern and/or in a picture you choose. You start off with the native behavior of your screen, which may be far from what you want to see eventually. Click inside the pattern (or inside the picture) and drag the cursor around while holding the mouse button till you find the spot that provides the desired white balance. The bars in the corner show the relative Red, Green, and Blue values. (The instructions do indeed not mention that you need to hold the mouse button down while dragging the cursor around.)
Like
Brad
22 May 2005
I just tried out SuperCal today after trying two other display calibration software solutions. With out a doubt SuperCal gave the best results in an easy to use process. It takes full advantage of the computer to optimize the display output without needing any special measurement equipment. Test patterns and DVD playback now look great.
Like
Version 1.1.4
Funkboy
18 April 2005
I've used this with at least four different Macs, if not a few of my friends and other computers - I've finally decided it's time to purchase it. I've used it on an iBook G3 (dual USB), iMac G4 17" flat panel, iBook G4 (both iBooks are 12"), and most recently a Dell 1704FP with my new Mac Mini. Every time the color response and display appearance is highly improved, and with my new flat panel it's done it again. Thank you for such a great utility! The only things I could suggest as improvements are a slightly lower price (for $15 I would have purchased it a time or two earlier), and maybe... um... any other color tests? I have no idea, it sure looks good though.
Like (1)
Version 1.1.4
Anonymous
29 December 2004
Every time I used this on my PowerBook 12" laptop, it made my whole screen look like sh*t.
Like
Version 1.1.4
2 answer(s)
Brock-Brandenberg
Brock-Brandenberg
17 February 2005
Since SuperCal is a visual calibrator, it is possible for you to make bad measurements and get poor results - the final results are only as good as your measurements. But if you read through the details and suggestions in the user guide and make accurate and consistent measurements, you will see excellent results. bergdesign
Like (1)
Version 1.1.4
Anonymous
Anonymous
11 June 2005
garbage in, garbage out :)
Like (1)
Version 1.1.4
Robert
27 February 2003
Simply wonderful! Bet you didn't know that a Cinema Display could show such detail in the highlights and shadows. I knew the details were in there, they just needed a little coaxing to bring them out of hiding.
Like
Version 1.1.3
1 answer(s)
Anonymous
Anonymous
30 March 2004
I know what you're trying to say, but really, for that price the Cinema Display darn well better show good detail even before calibration.
Like
Version 1.1.4
$19.00

3.3

App requirements: 
  • Intel 32
  • Mac OS X 10.7.0 or later
Developer Website: 
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