Iris
Iris
1.1.6

5.0

Iris free download for Mac

Iris

1.1.6
29 May 2019

Control display emissions for safety.

Overview

Iris was created to protect your eyes, health, and productivity. Two of the most popular features of Iris are: the ability to decrease the amount of blue light emitted from the screen; and the ability to control the brightness without PWM flicker. There are several different modes and several different types of Iris, which are basically some preset values that many people use. Aside from this, you can customize Iris a lot. I know that it can be a little hard for non-technical people, but I’m doing my best to make it as easy to use as possible. By default, Iris works automatically and detects if it’s day or night. Based on that, it will change your screen color temperature and brightness. When you open the control panel of the program, you can select different modes and types of Iris. If this is still too hard for you, try Iris mini, which is smaller version of Iris with a smaller size and lower CPU usage.

Both Iris mini and Iris are free, but there are some Pro versions with more features. Some of the benefits of Iris over competitors are that Iris works even on docking stations and monitors connected with USB with the help of my custom high-level Color-API, it has really bigger blue light reduction color range compared to all other alternatives, brightness without pulse-width modulation, manual settings, color effects, font rendering, magnification and part screen blue light reduction with the help of full screen overlays. You can buy Iris Pro with more options and advanced settings for $10.

What's new in Iris

Version 1.1.6:
  • Release notes were unavailable when this listing was updated.

4 Iris Reviews

Rate this app:

Lvdoc
24 March 2017

Most helpful

I concur that it's great. Full disclosure, I encouraged the developer to get this on MacUpdate. It has many nice features. I think the UI could use some improvement, and I'd like to see hot keys available for the Mac. (They do work with Windows at the moment.) But the developer has been very responsive, appears to work on Iris regularly, and seems very open to suggestions. I believe Iris will continue to evolve. I've seen some reviews of program in MU that seem to like to bash another program with "Program X does this for free." That never seemed an appropriate manner for evaluating a program. One can always find free programs that do some of what another program does. That does not necessarily make any particular program bad. In this instance, Iris is most likely to be compared to f.lux, and I hope people don't bash Iris in terms of "f.lux is free." That is true; and f.lux is a very good program. I would encourage anyone to please check out Iris before making comparisons. Iris does what f.lux does, but it also does a number of other things as well.
Like (1)
Version 0.8.9.2
Big Johnson
04 October 2017
Wrong version listed.
The downloaded file is v0.9.2.5.

And the new version ROYALLY SUCKS!

There's no fully-functional trial period, it's crippleware.

Don't download unless you intend to pay for it, because all the settings are locked: "You need Iris Pro to access this section."

You're not allowed to adjust the brightness or temperature anymore.
You can't even set your location so it knows when to change.

And when you close the Settings window (since it's useless anyway), the app QUITS!

Either use it with the one setting provided, or BUY IT!

Although it has its own issues, I recommend f.lux over this POS.
Like
Version 0.8.9.2
1 answer(s)
Big Johnson
Big Johnson
04 October 2017
BTW, v0.9.2.5 is available from dev's site.

And it also crashes when you close the Settings window.

Greedy AND incompetent!
Like
Derekcurrie
11 September 2017
macOS 10.12 Sierra provides the evening blue reduction feature for compatible displays. For other displays try: A) f.lux: The original, entirely free app for this purpose: https://www.macupdate.com/app/mac/37261/f-lux B) Iris: The free version is generally the same as f.lux. I personally do not like the sales pitch for Iris specifically because it attempts to pretend it provides "safety." There is literally no 'safety' provided. I'm saying this as an expert of color and light technology. Having said that, many people are sensitive to the blue light emissions of various computer displays, which may cause their body to have difficulty falling asleep at night, Shifting the display color balance toward red at night is the purpose of macOS, f.lux and Iris. There are also some displays (none by Apple I am aware of) that can cause flicker. If you have such a display, Iris may reduce the resulting annoyance. Iris Pro provides added features built into the developer's 'Color-API'. Whether these features are useful will be up to the user to decide.
Like (1)
Version 0.8.9.2
1 answer(s)
Jimw
Jimw
08 January 2018
Monitor color temperature is not an 'emission' as one normally classifies monitor emissions. Monitor emissions normally refers to electromagnetic fields and radiation such as x-rays. While this was a concern to some users of older monitors with CRT displays - i.e. picture tubes, flat screen displays no longer have this issue as they have LED's or LCD's instead of electron guns. This app is only time I have ever seen the monitor color referred to as an 'emission'. As such this app has nothing to do with safety as modern flat scree monitors no longer have the theoretical capability to emit harmful radiation. Sunlight, even on a cloudy day, has more capacity to produce harmful radiation than modern monitors. Personally I am of the option that the reference to 'safety' is a marketing ploy to generate fear in computer users, that their monitor may be emitting harmful radiation. Even if that were true, this app would not protect you against it as it only changes the color of the monitor screen. A cheap pair of sunglasses would do the same thing.

That said, I fully agree with the comments of Derekcurrie, in that monitor color and flicker can have a psychology effect on some which includes triggering seizers in those with such a condition or migraines in those individuals that get them, along triggering some other conditions that a minority of the population experiences. As such any tool, including night driving glasses (yellow tint) can reduce or eliminate this trigger.

Monitor flicker is a completely different topic. Flat screen displays can flicker or pulsate, most at a frequency that the majority of individuals don't notice or can detect. If you are a person that has this sensitivity, and you probably already know who you are, if this App can control that, then it might be helpful. For the rest of us, this is a non-issue. If you are such a person then you likely have an issue with florescent lighting as well as such lighting known to produce detectable flicker in a larger segment of the population.

In any case, modern flat screen monitions are not going to cause cancer from radiation or make you sterile., which were some of the claims attributed the old style CRT monitors. As to magnetic radiation claims, one would expect that power line workers, who get magnetic radiation exposure thousands of times higher than persons using monitors would have a significantly higher rate of radiation induced illnesses than the average population. They don't. A single MRI is likely to give you more electromagnetic radiation exposure from a single test then you would ever get from a computer monitor in your entire life. And if such radiation is of serious concern, get rid of your cell phone as it likely produces more than your monitor and you hold that right next to your brain when you use it.
Like
Jimw
24 March 2017
This program is listed as free but is actually 5-10 dollars depending on what features you wish to have.
Like (1)
Version 0.8.9.2
6 answer(s)
Fariborz
Fariborz
25 March 2017
The main functions that ordinary users need in everyday life are free of charge. No nag appears like other applications to invite you to buy the full version. If someone needs more features (please see the description) then he/she should buy them at a reasonable price. I gladly paid my shareware price and have never been more satisfied with a utility that saves my sight. Fariborz AMIRSHAHI – Verona (Italy)
Like
Jimw
Jimw
25 March 2017
To Fariborz: In case you failed to notice, I made no comment about the product other than the fact that that not all the features are in the free program and what the cost is if you which to have more features than what is in the basic program; information that was not included in the description or price. MacUpdate listed the product as "free" which in not true if you wish to more of the listed features. For the paid version, each machine must have a separate fee based license. As a educated consumer, I believe that full disclosure of any costs should be included, up front, in the description of a software product. Depending on the number of apps you have on your machine, even small costs can eventually run up you totally software costs into the hundreds and thousands of dollars. This is also very true for subscription based products that over the years prove to be extremely expensive and which I try to avoid if at all possible. An example of this is MacUpdate Desktop which over 5 years can cost you $400 just for the privilege of simplifying App updates. I have much better things I can do with $400. How about you?
Like (1)
Fariborz
Fariborz
26 March 2017
Hello Jimw,
Yes, I do agree with you that nowadays many software developers offer their products as “FREEWARE” whereas they are actually not. AppStore’s selling policy is very confusing with its “in-purchase” practice. What seems at first sight a totally free software (Oxford Dictionary is a good example) turns out to be rather an expensive purchase. My intention was not to defend the bad sale policies or to blame MacUpdate for not publishing the exact detail of each software category. You are absolutely right to bring up such legitimate issues. I just wanted to point out that for this particular software i.e. “Iris” all its main features are unlocked except for a few options like “Screen Overlay” that allows changing or dimming the screen according to one’s taste. I use it often when I burn the midnight oil because I can’t stand some tiring colors or the extreme brightness of my monitor. As for spending the money on other things instead of on software I think we all know how to take care of our money. I as a researcher spend a lot of money on software that ease my computing life. Thank you and cheers.
Like (1)
Jimw
Jimw
26 March 2017
From the developers website: The $5 upgrade list 4 additional features; the $10 upgrade list 24 additional features.

What is confusing is that the lifetime license is only for a single version and that new versions will require a new license. I am not sure if this means that the user must purchase each new version for the fee based license or if the user must just obtain a new license from the website. If it is the former, it would defiantly discourage me from considering purchase of the product.
Like (1)
Fariborz
Fariborz
27 March 2017
Today (March 27, 2017) Apple released OS 10.12.4 that has this function embedded in it. It's called "Night Shift". I haven't checked it yet because I'm quite pleased with Iris and don't see any reason why I should switch to another utility of this kind. However those who are interested should know that there is such a possibility with the new System.
Like
amutavdzija
amutavdzija
02 August 2017
I wonder what Fariborz considers "functions that ordinary users need in everyday life" is defined as. Because for me, on the free version, I can't change anything related to the transition, or manage monitors, and honestly don't know what the other features are. But I can, for some reason, apply a bright red "Biohacker" overlay to my screen because that's useful never. I'd save time and not worry about downloading this one.
Like
Lvdoc
24 March 2017
I concur that it's great. Full disclosure, I encouraged the developer to get this on MacUpdate. It has many nice features. I think the UI could use some improvement, and I'd like to see hot keys available for the Mac. (They do work with Windows at the moment.) But the developer has been very responsive, appears to work on Iris regularly, and seems very open to suggestions. I believe Iris will continue to evolve. I've seen some reviews of program in MU that seem to like to bash another program with "Program X does this for free." That never seemed an appropriate manner for evaluating a program. One can always find free programs that do some of what another program does. That does not necessarily make any particular program bad. In this instance, Iris is most likely to be compared to f.lux, and I hope people don't bash Iris in terms of "f.lux is free." That is true; and f.lux is a very good program. I would encourage anyone to please check out Iris before making comparisons. Iris does what f.lux does, but it also does a number of other things as well.
Like (1)
Version 0.8.9.2
Free

5.0

App requirements: 
  • Intel 64
  • OS X 10.8.0 or later
Developer Website: 
Download(34 MB)MacUpdateInstall with MacUpdate

Downloaded & Installed 1,201 times