Accent Doctor
Accent Doctor
0.39

0.0

Accent Doctor free download for Mac

Accent Doctor

0.39
26 October 2011

Utility for fixing special characters in HTML.

Overview

Accent Doctor is a Web development productivity enhancement utility which takes the pain out of manually finding and fixing special HTML characters such as those found in foreign languages such as French, Spanish, German, etc. This is critically important when you're using charset=iso-8859-1.

Example: Easily converts Åcçént Døctör into: Åcçént Døctör so you don't end up with: ?c??nt D?ct?r

.

What's new in Accent Doctor

Version 0.39:

Overall change:

  • Encodes only the HTML characters that cause display issues in browsers.
Other changes:
  • Absolute and Relative graphics now show up in preview
  • Interface enhancements
  • URL bar updates with path of file
  • Upon launch, Web preview window now displays the latest and greatest information about Accent Doctor.
  • Upgrade Notifications

2 Accent Doctor Reviews

Rate this app:

Dana-Sutton
23 October 2011

Most helpful

Can somebody help me out here? I had thought that the need to insert special html code to allow browsers to display special characters was no longer necessary, now that Unicode is available. Both OSX and Windows ship with Unicode polytonic fonts with many ranges of glyphs, and all good modern browsers, page creation programs, and word processors with which I am familiar can handle Unicode gracefully. So why is this program necessary? Maybe there's a good reason, and I'm curious to learn what it is.
Like (1)
Version 0.39
Welded
07 February 2012
Obnoxiously, this app associates itself with dozens of filetypes. Why would I want all my source code to default to this utility rather than my IDE?
Like
Version 0.39
Dana-Sutton
23 October 2011
Can somebody help me out here? I had thought that the need to insert special html code to allow browsers to display special characters was no longer necessary, now that Unicode is available. Both OSX and Windows ship with Unicode polytonic fonts with many ranges of glyphs, and all good modern browsers, page creation programs, and word processors with which I am familiar can handle Unicode gracefully. So why is this program necessary? Maybe there's a good reason, and I'm curious to learn what it is.
Like (1)
Version 0.39
8 answer(s)
Naoh
Naoh
23 October 2011
The issue isn't what the various operating systems are capable of. It is more to do with the limitations in HTML.
Like
ronaldpr
ronaldpr
23 October 2011
Dana Sutton is right. In properly UTF-8 encoded (x)html files you can type any special character you like and when the matching meta tag for character encoding is used, all those characters will be displayed fine in browsers in nowadays operating systems. I have not used html entities in years without any problem. The only characters that absolutely need to be changed into html entities (also when using UTF-8) are characters that have a special function in html: < (<), > (>), and & (&).
Like
ronaldpr
ronaldpr
23 October 2011
I typed the entities after the three characters, but this system shows them as the characters they represent.
Like
camville
camville
24 October 2011
Dana: it looks as though you tried to add some characters in your post that weren't handled as gracefully as you had hoped. Though I have my browser's Encoding set to UTF-8, the characters you have peppered throughout your comment aren't showing properly for me and I doubt many others thus answering your question as to the validity of this app.
Like
ronaldpr
ronaldpr
24 October 2011
Cameron Gull, What are you talking about? I don't see anything unusual in Dana's post. The app may do what it is supposed to do, but it comes 10 years too late.
Like
camville
camville
24 October 2011
Ronadam: Perhaps it's just Firefox (7.01)? I tried it out in Safari and it looks normal... Weird. Try it in Firefox and let me know if you see the same thing. Anyhow, yes, I agree it's 10 years late, but for those dealing with localizations of websites into multiple languages, it's amazingly helpful - especially when the copy you're using comes straight from Word.
Like
ronaldpr
ronaldpr
24 October 2011
The display problem seems to be limited to Mozilla browsers. I see it in Firefox, Camino, and SeaMonkey. In Safari, iCab, Opera, and Omniweb, Dana's comments look normal. In the source code of this page the extra characters appear to be control characters (UTF-8 Hex 0x10). They are ignored by other than the Mozilla browsers. I do not know how they got in Dana's comment, but it has nothing to do with special (accented) characters.
Like
camville
camville
24 October 2011
With how random the characters were placed in Dana's comment, I was assuming (perhaps incorrectly) that he/she (?) was trying to make a point by throwing in a few of these pesky çhãråčtęrs and thought it was a tad ironic when it didn't work. :)
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Free

0.0

App requirements: 
  • Intel 64
  • Mac OS X 10.6.8 or later
Category: 
Developer Website: 
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