DisplayLink USB Graphics Driver
DisplayLink USB Graphics Driver
2.2

2.3

DisplayLink USB Graphics Driver free download for Mac

DisplayLink USB Graphics Driver

2.2
21 March 2014

Driver for DisplayLink powered hardware (beta).

Overview

DisplayLink USB Graphics Driver ... DisplayLink USB devices are the easiest way to add an additional monitor to your Mac. This driver, with the relevant DisplayLink-powered hardware, will allow any Intel-based Mac - even a Mac Mini or MacBook Air - to connect up to 4 monitors over USB. This driver also supports the USB video of our customers' USB docking station products, giving you a cost-effective and easy way to connect your display and all of your peripherals to your MacBook, MacBook Pro, or MacBook Air, with only one USB 2.0 cable.

Click here for a complete list of supported products.

What's new in DisplayLink USB Graphics Driver

Version 2.2:
  • Support for a single DisplayLink screen on OS X 10.9
  • More screens can be connected but with severe limitations due to OS issues
  • Enhanced rendering quality on OS X 10.8 and 10.9
  • Bug fixes and compatibility improvements for all products

5 DisplayLink USB Graphics Driver Reviews

Rate this app:

Mistersquid
17 October 2008

Most helpful

The premise is that rather than transmitting video information over AGP or PCIe you would do so over USB. The investment in technology is expensive. USB Monitors begin at around $300 and you have to have software in place. In the case of computer-to-monitor configs, your CPU will be doing the compression of information to transmit over the USB network. If you want dedicated hardware to accelerate the compression, you're talking about another $300 or so. The problem with this is that the technology for PCIe and AGP is so much more advanced for similar prices and you are not using compression technology. Present GPU technology provides multiple dedicated processors for use not only in graphics applications, but for users of OS X and the forthcoming 10.6, the regular OS will make use of those GPUs. I doubt any application will be able to use the processors dedicated to transmitting video over USB. This is technology is useful for quick build-up and teardown of multiple monitor setups, sure, but as a replacement for mature technology already in place on Macintosh systems, this is a solution in search of problem.
Like (2)
Version 1.0
Tsivonen
17 July 2019
The upgrade to version 5 has been great!
Like
Version 2.2
Mr_Mark
09 October 2018
Please do not use a DisplayLink Device!!! Driver Support is very limited - so updates are once a year, the rest are betas and then your really in the beta mood.... and even if your using the right driver and the right OS content problems will follow you for example: loosing signal on the monitor, can't login because login window is corrupted (internal display), crashes, over crashes... tested on over 40 MBP devices all with the dell 6000 dock, tested with 10.13.3, 10.13.6; 10.14 and all available DisplayLink driver all the betas and all the stable versions....
Like
Version 2.2
OhEssex
04 September 2012
This software is already up to version 1.8. Just beware that it's currently a mess for mountain lion, but it's OK for 10.7 and below.
Like
Version 1.7 Beta 1
Jan-rybar
27 January 2009
Great. It's reliable and it allows me to use two LCDs with my MacBook Pro. I use it every day and no problems.
Like
Version 1.1
Mistersquid
17 October 2008
The premise is that rather than transmitting video information over AGP or PCIe you would do so over USB. The investment in technology is expensive. USB Monitors begin at around $300 and you have to have software in place. In the case of computer-to-monitor configs, your CPU will be doing the compression of information to transmit over the USB network. If you want dedicated hardware to accelerate the compression, you're talking about another $300 or so. The problem with this is that the technology for PCIe and AGP is so much more advanced for similar prices and you are not using compression technology. Present GPU technology provides multiple dedicated processors for use not only in graphics applications, but for users of OS X and the forthcoming 10.6, the regular OS will make use of those GPUs. I doubt any application will be able to use the processors dedicated to transmitting video over USB. This is technology is useful for quick build-up and teardown of multiple monitor setups, sure, but as a replacement for mature technology already in place on Macintosh systems, this is a solution in search of problem.
Like (2)
Version 1.0
1 answer(s)
Chin
Chin
21 July 2009
I bought a nice USB to DVI adapter device just yesterday. With this driver it works flawlessly although it use some more CPU cycles on my Mac Mini Intel with Tiger 10.4.11. But this seem to be the only one reliable solution I know to get two monitors connected to my Mac Mini, with each on having a resolution of 1280x1024. My previous solution was to use the DualHead2Go device, but that can only provide 2 times 1024x768 due to the limited graphic card builtin my Mini. So after all, there is a problem, that solution solve for me :-)
Like (1)
Version 1.1.3b1
Free

2.3

App requirements: 
  • Intel 64
  • Intel 32
  • Mac OS X 10.6.8 or later
Category: 
Developer Website: 
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