StoryMill
StoryMill
4.0.5

3.9

StoryMill free download for Mac

StoryMill4.0.5

28 October 2011

Novel-writing software.

Overview

Note: StoryMill is no longer under development, but it is still available for download.

StoryMill is ideal for the aspiring novelist.

Part word processor, part database, StoryMill 4 provides every author with the tools essential to writing a best seller: everything from project-wide annotations to centuries-spanning timelines, an industry first. StoryMill introduces aspiring authors to multi-level writing methods of tracking characters, scenes, and locations, while professional writers will appreciate StoryMill's timesaving ability to oversee and manage the full creative process with Smart Views. Built from the ground up for Mac OS X, StoryMill offers an innovative way to channel and fine tune the creative writing process. Although StoryMill provides an impressive array of features to help you write and track the details of your story more effectively, none of them are required! StoryMill is incredibly flexible: it can simply be a no-nonsense place to write and revise using its distraction-free fullscreen and powerful annotations, or a complete database of every character, location, and scene that makes up your novel.

From inception to publication, writing a novel has never been easier.

What's new in StoryMill

Version 4.0.5:
  • Resolved a number of issues relating to OS X 10.7-autosave, by restoring StoryMill's previous autosave implementation, supported on both OS X 10.7 and 10.6
  • Restored Find functionality on OS X 10.6
  • Fixed a problem where captions added to pictures were not always getting saved
  • Fixed a problem where assigning a Storyiine via the Info pane, would fail to save the Storyline selection
  • Fixed a problem where assigning a scene to a chapter would not "stick" under certain circumstances

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How would you rate StoryMill app?

22 Reviews of StoryMill

3
Barak-Bruerd
02 December 2008
Version: 3.2

Most helpful

As a writer moving away from using multiple tools to create a composition (usually a combination of omnioutliner, MS Word, and a folder full of clippings) I started researching writing tools with some enthusiasm. Scrivener and StoryMill were the most obvious choices and both seemed to have a solid set of features. Most challenging however were the range of very mixed reviews. Scrivener by far had the most positive, while StoryMill ranged from exceedingly high marks, to very frustrated and disillusioned users. Rather than repeating a great many other feature comparison reviews I'll summarized with the key features unique to each: StoryMill: Timeline, characters, locations, and specific breakdown of chapters and scenes. Scrivener: Cork board, outline, scratch pad There are other unique features however these have been the most significant in my use of the two applications. By and large, StoryMill has a longer learning curve and is more complicated, but once learned the applications allows writers to create very complex narratives. If you write fiction and non-fiction StoryMill is probably the best fit. Scrivener on the other hand has a sleek, easy-to-use interface that allows for easy gathering and re-arranging of information. While it can be used in a similar fashion to StoryMill for narratives, it is a more flexible program for research and writing of more technical or informational pieces (anything non-narrative in nature). For those with more flexible needs or who want to be up and running faster, scrivener is probably the best option. Price points on both are fairly aggressive for both programs and a mere $5 between the two should not drive a purchase decision since you will be spending many hours in front of the computer and should be choosing the best program for your work, not the cheapest. Both are outstanding apps.
(10)
5
an-revival
03 October 2015
Version: 4.0.5
I really like Storymil. It's very accessible for me, as a VoiceOver user. It works as advertised. I would recommend this software to anyone who is looking to write their book, but is having trouble organizing their ideas and subplots.
(0)
Miner
28 October 2013
Version: 4.0.5
No development for exactly 2 years now, while Storymill, Scrivener and Ulysses continue to perfect their offering. I think we can say goodbye to StoryMill...
(2)
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1
anonymous-wombat-32
16 August 2012
Version: 4.0.5
DO NOT TRUST THIS PROGRAM WITH YOUR DATA This program has quit twice now, losing my partner an entire chapter of her book each time. She saves every five minutes and has auto-save turned on but it appears the program hasn't been saving all day, she even exports the text every day to a word file. Twice now the program has crashed (today while exporting) and when logging back in, the entire chapter is in the StoryMill trash and is empty. The program appears to just corrupt the sqlite database that contains the text, making it completely unrecoverable. have emailed the developers about the issues and heard absolutely NOTHING back after three weeks. Do not trust the program with your data, that's all i can say!
(4)
5
Marktron
21 July 2011
Version: 4.0.3
I really like the search and word tracking features. Plus setting realistic daily goals for my writing has really helped me.
(2)
Stevegee
17 December 2009
Version: 3.2.3
Well I lost some data as well with StoryMill - and I'm usually pretty careful. Still don't know where it went. I decided to delete StoryMill, and what surprised me when I used App Delete to delete it was how many crash reports were associated with this software. I think there were 15. You tend to loose track of how many times something crashes. By the way - have a look on the bugs forum over at Mariner and see the problems that people report in. StoryMill appears to have more bugs than my dog - but I stopped wasting my time with it. Bye bye Mariner.
(3)
3
Barak-Bruerd
02 December 2008
Version: 3.2
As a writer moving away from using multiple tools to create a composition (usually a combination of omnioutliner, MS Word, and a folder full of clippings) I started researching writing tools with some enthusiasm. Scrivener and StoryMill were the most obvious choices and both seemed to have a solid set of features. Most challenging however were the range of very mixed reviews. Scrivener by far had the most positive, while StoryMill ranged from exceedingly high marks, to very frustrated and disillusioned users. Rather than repeating a great many other feature comparison reviews I'll summarized with the key features unique to each: StoryMill: Timeline, characters, locations, and specific breakdown of chapters and scenes. Scrivener: Cork board, outline, scratch pad There are other unique features however these have been the most significant in my use of the two applications. By and large, StoryMill has a longer learning curve and is more complicated, but once learned the applications allows writers to create very complex narratives. If you write fiction and non-fiction StoryMill is probably the best fit. Scrivener on the other hand has a sleek, easy-to-use interface that allows for easy gathering and re-arranging of information. While it can be used in a similar fashion to StoryMill for narratives, it is a more flexible program for research and writing of more technical or informational pieces (anything non-narrative in nature). For those with more flexible needs or who want to be up and running faster, scrivener is probably the best option. Price points on both are fairly aggressive for both programs and a mere $5 between the two should not drive a purchase decision since you will be spending many hours in front of the computer and should be choosing the best program for your work, not the cheapest. Both are outstanding apps.
(10)
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Babyfett
03 July 2008
Version: 3.1
I too tested both Scrivener and Story Mill and while both had features I wished the other had, I ended up with Scrivener because there were certain limitations to Story Mill that were just too detrimental to the process. I couldn't change font size in the main window (I don't always want to write in full screen mode.) Anyway, Scrivener won my money.
(5)
Mswwsm
15 May 2008
Version: 3.0.2
I can't give this product any kind of fair review as I can't quite figure out what it's for. If I had to guess, I'd say this -- and the similar Scrivener -- are for writers who may indeed have the prose chops to get the job done but can't get a handle on how to organize longer manuscripts in their heads, and they also like to keep absolutely everything on their Macs. The Timeline feature I thought would be the most useful -- dates are something I do sometimes flub -- as I expected I'd punch in a scene, give it a date, it would show up on the timeline. Apparently, however, you have to associate scenes with events, and the timeline is then TOO detailed: I don't need to see hours, let alone minutes, but rather just an overview so that I can at a glance see where I probably haven't misdated a significant event having cascading effect on future events, or to which preceding events ultimately arrive. Sometimes, not infrequently, I need to see a span of DECADES all on one line, all at one time, and this seems impossible with the software. Foremost, StoryMill and Scrivener are not models for how novelists I know actually work. We have various loose "processes", we keep notes, we do research -- not too little research on-the-fly, so to speak -- and we may rough out in a notebook, on an index card, or on the back of the power bill, overarching plot lines, concepts, perhaps brief character sketches, snippets of especially pithy dialogue or metaphor we just have to use, that sort of thing. But everyone I know merely takes something that's been stewing, sits down one morning, or evening, or dead in the middle of night, and begins writing; then we go back and eradicate, illuminate and, well, prevaricate, as required to make the story whole. I can see how software of this type might be beneficial to those writers -- serial television comes immediately to mind -- who are regular employees, who absolutely Must produce a story, and MUST produce it on a deadline, often using many of the same characters, plot histories, locales and preceding events in developing their plots. As for aspiring novelists, screenwriters, playwrights, etc., I can't help but advise you'd be far better off just sitting down and writing, ignoring the confusing disorganized mess you may create -- because you CAN -- and WILL, if you stick at it -- develop a process for sorting things out, making sense of disparate parts and gluing them together into a coherent story. The bottom line is, called upon to take 60,000 - 120,000 words or more, vet this draft for grammar, style, continuity errors, etc., it's never going to just wrap up nicely, and it's always going to degrade into a brutal grind at times, whether you write on legal pads with a blunt pencil or with these sorts of computerized writers toolkits. It's never easy, no matter what.
(8)
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4
Trenino
09 May 2008
Version: 3.0.2
Montage - A review and comparison to Storymill I have been using the demo of Storymill for about a week writing my new project. Because it is a script I am working on there are things I am missing in it, although there are many nice features. I also downloaded the last version of Montage (1.4) to see if any developments have been made to it, since the last version I used, I did not like. Although Storymill is for novels and Montage for scripts, they both target creative writers. As one of them I am making this comparison. Surprisingly although Montage has been longer in the line-up of Mariner Software it is much less refined than Storymill. Here is a comparison: 1) The Progress meter feature lacks from Montage. Screenwriters need to keep track of their productivity as well. 2)User interface under Montage: The content in Research window and Task window cannot be moved around. It is automatically sorted. Besides that, when sorting by name, a very annoying thing happens. number 10 does not follow number 9, in order, but goes after number 1... Storymill on the other hand lets you move things around. 3)The double-clicking of content in Storymill makes it pop up on a separate window. It would really be useful for Montage too, which does not have that feature either. 4) Smart view is a great feature in both programs. 5)This is personal, but aesthetically the icons in Montage are not so nice as the ones in Storymill. Actually they look like OS9 icons.. 6)Timeline which is only in Storymill, would be tremendously helpful for screenwriter using Montage as well. 7) Tagging in Storymill is like the “Add keyword” option in Montage, only in storymill it works better. 8) The beginners' Tutorial in Storymill is a very nice extra that comes with the program. Again Montage lacks is it. 9) Full screen only works on script and scenes mode in Montage. Not in synopsis mode or any other. In storymill all windows can be viewed in full screen. And it is really nice to work on synopses or character profiles in full screen. This is a real shame. 10) Button for making annotations in storymill. In montage you have to go through the menu each time you want to make a note. 11)No option for deselecting the auto Backup. If you deselect it you cannot save your work at all. 12) Annotations can ONLY be made in script mode, not in synopsis, character, scene or other mode in Montage. Again in Storymill things are much better. ANnotations can be made on every mode. The list goes on... 13) Exporting is so unintuitive in Montage. In Storymill you have a preview of exactly what is going to be exported and you can change it accordingly. In Montage you export first and then you check if you exported the right thing. I am still finding more handicaps in montage the more I use it. It is really sad as it could have been developed to a very nice application. As I said earlier Storymill is definitely much more refined than Montage. If you are a novelist you are lucky and good to go with Storymill. If on the other hand you are a script writer like me, then you you have to look elsewhere and definitely not spend the money for purchasing this version. I would purchase anytime Storymill if it only had standard script formating and outline. On the other hand Montage compared to the Storymill features are very thin. For the moment and my current project (which is a Feature Film) I will be using Storymill for Synopses, Characters, Research, Scene Ideas, and ONLY then I will go to Montage to write the script, but I might still prefer Final Draft until a better version of either Storymill or Montage comes out or even better if they would merge it in one application as it seems that Storymill and Montage are in fact one application cut in half and therefore crippled. You can download the Demos and see for yourselves.
(0)
5
Schubert
01 May 2008
Version: 3.0.2
To make a potentially long-winded review short... If you want the best software tool in this category, buy StoryMill now, and don't look back! Nothing compares to the value of StoryMill. It is that good. I have beta-tested software for over 20 years, and can honestly say that StoryMill is as smooth, quick, and complete, as I have worked with over the years. Most importantly, it is very stable. The developer has gone through great lengths to create an incredible and powerful piece of software. I highly recommend all products from the developer (Mariner Software) to all of my friends and clients. Mariner understands the needs of the consumer and have an excellent customer service reputation.
(1)
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Semioticmonkey
16 April 2008
Version: 3.0.2
One Word. Scrivener. Cheaper. Powerful. Bueautiful. Well crafted. Buy it (i've done it) and forget about the rest,
(3)
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5
Tsmbones
23 March 2008
Version: 3.0.1
As someone who has always wanted to write a book but didn't know quite how to begin, StoryMill has turned out to be one of my favorite applications. What has been the most impressive is the easily understandable method of organizing. Adding characters and locations is a simple task. The annotation feature is especially welcome-I don't have to worry about a bunch of sticky-notes or loose pieces of paper to collect my thoughts-all my information/notes can be nicely collected and be in one place. The area called the 'metadata' panel, gives me a 'snapshot' of what is in my chapters-for someone who is writing for the first time and in my spare time-it's a great way to review. This is a product that I would not hesitate to recommend.
(1)
Zx81
22 January 2008
Version: 3.0
It looks as if Avenir has been sold to Mariner Software. The timeline view which has been added is an interesting feature.
(0)
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Lord-Lightning
08 May 2007
Version: 2.3.4
If you have one chapter, one actor, and one scene the panel that sits on top of your actual writing panel is small enough to get on with the business of writing, but if you have twenty five chapters, forty characters (actors), or over a hundred scenes - there is is no room left to write in the panel below. SOLUTION: get Scrivener, http://www.literatureandlatte.com/scrivener.html
(0)
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Jonlink
03 April 2007
Version: 2.3.3
This looks a lot like Celtx, which is a great open source program. Does anyone have any commnets on how the two really compare?
(0)
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5
George-The-Flea
30 January 2007
Version: 2.3.1
I bought Avenir back in version 2.2 because, although the interface was klunky and it didn't have all the features I wanted, I liked it better than CopyWrite and the developer said that he was adding tags in 2.3. I used 2.2 a bit, but not extensively. Version 2.3, however, has turned this program into a serious contender with other writing software. As far as I am concerned, Avenir is my single most important tool as an author. The implementation of tags as universal metadata, the no-frills fullscreen, and the powerful scenes-centric organization make Avenir perfectly suited for writing fiction of any length. I am currently half-way through a novel that has been written entirely in Avenir 2.3 and it has been an incredibly pleasurable experience. I have been actively beta testing 2.3, and although Avenir is stil missing some important features (like versioning), the developer is extremely open with users and takes user suggestions and criticisms very seriously. The fact that Avenir is still being actively developed and that the developer is willing to implement user-requested features makes this software a pretty incredible value if you are willing to actively participate in the community. One thing to note is that Avenir is not software for everyone. If you write fiction, you may well find it indispensable, but for general-purpose writing a tool such as Scrivener may serve you better. On the other hand, the reliance on tags allows for a great deal of user-defined structure within Avenir, and the interface is simple and easy to understand (whereas programs such as Scrivener suffer more feature bloat). I really cannot recommend Avenir strongly enough. If you write fiction, you owe it to yourself to give this software a try, and if you have any questions about it please stop by the forums and find out for yourself how helpful the developer can be.
(0)
Lord-Lightning
29 November 2006
Version: 2.3b11
Yes, Avenir is OK, but compared to Scrivener it is not even close as a real writing tool for serious everyday writers. http://www.literatureandlatte.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=626&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=0 Scrivener is about to go beta 5 and then to full version 1 in month or so. It is an astonishing application, scoring at least 4 or 5 stars on each key indicator. At the moment it is free. Read the documentation that comes with the dmg and also the Tips and Tricks thread. A manual is promised with the release of full version 1 around Christmas - New Year. At least do a comparison between Avenir and Scrivener before parting with your money.
(0)
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3
Anonymous
07 October 2005
Version: 2.2.11
This app needs a good bit of work to earn a place in my array of tools as a professional writer. Though the support is exemplary and the price isn't outright insane (like one of its major competitors'), there are some stability problems that made me unable to trust it (though I haven't tried the most recent version). The feature set could stand to be plumped up a bit, too. The one feature that stands out the most is the side-bar-annotation-thingie. Great job there. More features like that, please!
(1)
Mrandre1
13 April 2005
Version: 2.2.3
I remember looking at this app a few months ago, and thinking it tremendously bad. However, being a writer, I always check every tool, hoping that the as of yet hidden One True Tool will appear. I must say, the improvement has been significant. This is a decent editor now, with some nice touches. I particularly like the inline annotation scheme. Pretty slick. I'm less enthused about the seperate editor windows. What can I say? Fewer windows == better in my mind. I don't like the ambigous icons for inserting and deleting items. I don't like that I can add an item, but if I ask to edit it, I am told to give it a name. I don't like that I can't double click to edit a chapter. I don't like that I must save the whole project before I can even edit a chapter. I don't like that there's a new project button on a project's button bar. Huh? I do like the many layers of notes. I don't like that I have to tell those to appear. I don't like that this is under an info button. Somehow I didn't make the mental leap. Sticking with CopyWrite, which also needs attention. But much improved. We'll see.
(0)
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Anonymous
04 April 2005
Version: 2.2
By far the best creative writing program out there is CopyWrite - once you use its full-screen mode you'll never use anything else.
(0)
4.25
Anonymous
24 September 2004
Version: 1.3
This is a brilliant little app if you're prepared to learn the ins and outs. I'm sure I'll register it. Like the previous writer said, it could be more customisable, but that's a strength in some ways, it keeps things simple and just lets you get on with it. Very Apple-ish. One thing that it does score well for is database searches. Makes keeping track of characters and scenes much easier. Anyway, it's a good solid app all round.
(0)
2
Anonymous
14 September 2004
Version: 1.3
eh, it's far from ready to be charged for. There are no other reviews because it's so sub-par to say the least. However, i like a few things about it, namely the little button at the bottom right hand side that allows you to make the window transparent and the bring it back. that is actually something that would come in handy. overall though, it's very limited in what it can allow you to do. It needs to be able to handle A LOT of user customization since I, and I'm sure, lots of other writers, don't use the same features/techniques for handling our notes, scenes, characters, etc. So in order for a program to be successful with the writer market/niche, it's going to need a whole hell of a lot of customizability, which no one has really accomplished so far. The things that need to be done are honestly too much to even list at this point. I use hogbay notebook because its a very customizable PIM (personal info manager). You can pretty much do anything and everything with it and really design it to fit your needs. But even with that said, I would switch over to something with as much capacity for customization, but geared towards writers, in a heart beat. it is just the best out there for now. this program, as it stands right now, is nothing but a frustrating constraint, so I really can't recommend it to any serious writer.
(0)
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