SMART Utility
SMART Utility
3.2.6

3.3

SMART Utility free download for Mac

SMART Utility3.2.6

07 May 2020

Checks the hardware diagnostics system of hard drives.

Overview

SMART Utility is an application to scan the internal hardware diagnostics system of hard drives. SMART (Self-Monitoring Analysis and Reporting Technology) is a system built into hard drives by their manufacturers to report on various measurements (called attributes) of a hard drive's operation. The attributes can be used to detect when a hard drive is having mechanical or electrical problems, and can indicate when the hard drive is dying. This allows time to hopefully backup, and then replace the drive.

Run this utility once a week or more to ensure your HD, and your data, are okay!

Note: The demo runs for 30 days or 15 launches, whichever is longer.

What's new in SMART Utility

Version 3.2.6:
Fixed:
  • A bug where outputting debug messages preferences would not properly change state
  • A couple interface bugs with the French translation
  • Some formatting issues with Help
Other:
  • Enabled notarization
  • Disabled “Buy” options until new purchasing system is ready
  • Updated to Sparkle 1.23

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How would you rate SMART Utility app?

45 Reviews of SMART Utility

qb
11 March 2019
Version: 3.2.4

Most helpful

Does anyone know if this developer post is from 2019? I just see a date of 8-Jan. I believe it is from 2019 and does indicate development is continuing. Yay! https://www.volitans-software.com/2019/01/the-future-of-smart-utility-2/ The Future of SMART Utility We wanted to give an update on SMART Utility. As you probably know, version 4.0 is much delayed. This lead to a re-evaluation of the roadmap. Version 4.0 was too ambitious for a single release, especially re-designing the interface. So the revise plan is this: Version 3.3 (out in a few weeks): Some new features and a bunch of bug fixes Version 4.0 (out in six months): Re-work the algorithm to better match todays drives Version 5.0 (out in one to two years): Re-design the interface
(2)
qb
11 March 2019
Version: 3.2.4
Does anyone know if this developer post is from 2019? I just see a date of 8-Jan. I believe it is from 2019 and does indicate development is continuing. Yay! https://www.volitans-software.com/2019/01/the-future-of-smart-utility-2/ The Future of SMART Utility We wanted to give an update on SMART Utility. As you probably know, version 4.0 is much delayed. This lead to a re-evaluation of the roadmap. Version 4.0 was too ambitious for a single release, especially re-designing the interface. So the revise plan is this: Version 3.3 (out in a few weeks): Some new features and a bunch of bug fixes Version 4.0 (out in six months): Re-work the algorithm to better match todays drives Version 5.0 (out in one to two years): Re-design the interface
(2)
Show comment (1)
Mcr
29 December 2018
Version: 3.2.4
Users need to realize, this app (and similar ones) are dependent and/or influenced by several external factors.
1) The information returned by SMART is open to interpretation. In many cases, manufacturers themselves don't adhere to the same interpretation of what a particular data field means relative to their product. Ultimately, the manufacturer of the drive decides how and what to report back. There really isn't any enforcement to keep manufacturers in line as far as how their devices report.

Once data is returned, then SOME programs that try to calculate and give a 'probability' of failure or life expectancy rating.; these ratings need to be taken in context, or at least take with grain of salt. There are several industry studies which have shown that correlation between SMART data, predictions made based on the data and actual failure rates, is NOT that strong...possibly only correlated in less than a third of hard drive failures. I've had rotational drives during the initial 'burn in' period that show a increase in some of the so called negative indicators (bad sectors reallocated); but then 'settle down' and continue working fine for years afterwards with no increases. Don't get caught up too much in what SMART data is saying, unless you see a trend overtime. Your strategy should be to always have multiple backups of key data, so that when and if a drive fails, your data is safe, rather than obsessing about whether to replace a drive the first time it shows any negative indication.

2) Regards SSDs, the SMART standard and specification was developed at a time when all drives were rotational. When it comes to SSD/non mechanical drives, many of the data types/info defined by SMART are ambiguous at best, or meaningless, or at worse used by manufacturers to bolster their product when in fact they are irrelevant. Some makers have added on additional data fields to report so called 'SSD' specific info, but other makers are not required to use them, or if they do, don't necessarily report back the same data, since the definition is so open. Or worse, they will come up with a way to report back a lower value and use that in a positive spin, even the meaning of what that data really indicates has been redefined by them. A perfect example is data field 231, loosely defined as 'Life Left' for SSD drive. Remember, this is data reported back by the drive based on the manufacturer's interpretation. Using different criteria, Samsung drives might report back a million erase cycles remaining, but Crucial drives might use that field to report back that 50% reserved space is left.

So, in the case of Samsung, if the drive was rated for 2 million erases cycles, does that mean the drive has 50% of life remaining; on a Crucial drive, if you never get close to using the full capacity, 50% reserved space isn't really a factor; and what actually can be inferred from that as far as 'Life Remaining'. For example, when a manufacturer says this SSD drive reports 'zero' whatever, i.e. my product is good....well, actually ALL SSDs are going to report a zero for that data, or some might report '100', but so what, because it has no relevance for non-mechanical drives.

Most people I suspect pay particular attention to the 'reallocated bad sector' data; for rotational drives that makes good sense. For SSDs, the data has less relevance, because the standard hasn't evolved to define what that really means for SSDs, so manufacturer's have, of course, used this ambiguity to dictate the data returned to put their product in a better light. With modern SSDs and controlers using techniques likes over provisioning, trim, garbage collection, etc. it can be open to interpretation what a 'bad sector' is. Manufacturer's can take a problem 'memory location' and move it to the over provisioning bucket of memory, or mark it to never be trimmed or garbage collected....does that mean they have to report it as a 'bad sector'. It's straight forward to associate an actual physical location of a bad sector when it comes to rotational device; for a memory device, it's a little more complicated. A "sector of data" on a rotational drive is 512 bytes at a physical location on the disk. With SSDs the smallest block is 512 KB (a thousand times larger), made up of pages, which can be variable, but frequently 4KB. These pages may or not be continguous in the 'traditional' sense, and can CHANGE internally without any knowledge to the operating system. This happens when an SSD drive performs it's own internal clean up, provisioning and trim operations. Windows and macOS still see that 'sector' of your Word document as sitting at sector 143,245; but internally, the drive can move the location and composition of that block around.

3) In order to retrieve SMART data, requires either an interface that is capable of doing so, or a direct method to the drive which requires specific knowledge of the model and how to retrieve the info (without using the standard interface commands). Internal drives on a SATA bus have no issues, the SATA spec provides for the proper commands to query a drive and report back the data. External drives are dependent on the chipset of the enclosure as to whether the interface supports the SMART commands needed to query the drive and return the SMART data. Older USB external interfaces (as well as Firewire) did not have this pass through capability. Newer interfaces which support USB Attached SCSI (UAS) or USB Attached SCSI Protocol (UASP). do allow for SMART data retrieval, so when you buy an external drive or stand alone enclosure or drive dock, make sure it supports UASP

End of the day, it's fine we have programs that report back SMART info. For rotational drives, more useful, for SSD's, not as much. How you personally, or the programs that retrieve data, interpret what that data means, can be subjective, particularly when it comes to trying to predict failure or life expectancy (again, better for rotational, not so much SSDs). Generally speaking, mechanical devices physically wear down over time, so may be possible to see a trend and they 'fail over time'. Pure electronic components tend to not show 'symptoms' or degradation over time, for lack of a better word; they work until such time that they don't work. That's why I said it's better to be sure that you have multiple backups rather than obsess too much about whether a particular device is showing signs of failure or going to fail.
(1)
Show comment (1)
GeogProf
02 August 2018
Version: 3.2.3
No responses from developer to any queries. No updates since Oct. 2016 despite the MANY advances and changes in drive tech. No way.
(2)
0.5
GeogProf
07 May 2017
Version: 3.2.3
THIS DOES NOT WORK ON SSDs (Solid State Drives) — IT ONLY WORKS ON HDDs (Hard Disk Drives, which Apple abandoned years ago in all MacBooks). Developer, please correct me if I’m wrong. If I’m not, do the right thing and indicate as much in your app’s introduction. BTW, DriveDX DOES work on SSDs. So now I have to abandon this $25 license and buy a $25 DriveDX license.
(2)
Show comments (3)
5
qb
17 March 2017
Version: 3.2.3
I've owned a 10-pack license and used SMART Utility since mid-2010. I do IT support and offend diagnose the "spinning beachball" on client computers as bad drive sectors. I find it amazing that even a single bad sector, even if reallocated, can cause such problems but they do. S-U has provided the info I need to point out that a replacement HDD is needed and get the client back running smoothly. I look forward to the announced, but late, release of v4!
(0)
1
christian-schaffner
24 January 2017
Version: 3.2.3
25 bucks is way to much when you can find similar apps for US$0.99 in the Mac App Store. I would like to point out our own app SSD Health Check: https://itunes.apple.com/app/ssd-health-check/id1193940657?l=de&ls=1&mt=12 It is fast and delivers not only detailed statistics (like unexpected power losses, power cycles, failed read/write attempts and more) but also real time data like current temperature and more. Definitely worth a try, especially since it is 25 x times cheaper than similar other apps!
(0)
Show comments (3)
GeogProf
22 September 2016
Version: 3.2.2
Is this useful for an internal SSD on a new MacBook Pro?
(0)
GeogProf
22 September 2016
Version: 3.2.2
Does this version work with Sierra?
(0)
1
A1D
07 March 2016
Version: 3.2.2
Of cause, the price is subjective thing. It reflects the amount of work from two side – How the App looks and How the App Works. It looks pretty dull, obviously no designers been involved in this. And developer doesn't bother about the UX / UI as well. Now about how it works. Compared to the competitors (DriveDx for example) it has limited functionality. I've tried to run the short test (App says 2 mins. approx) it never has been completed. I wouldn't conceder to buy this piece of software. Dramatically overpriced, lacks of design and functionality, bugged.
(2)
Forn
22 February 2016
Version: 3.2.2
25$! Am I the only one who thinks that nearly all APPs are way too expensive? Earlier they cost 5$ maybe 10 $. Now they are 20$ to 40$ and so on… By far to expensive. Not real values.
(2)
2
fwilkinson
02 November 2015
Version: 3.2.1
$25? lol
(2)
rardin
23 March 2015
Version: 3.1.4
Naming of the zip archive aside, the version of SMART Utility 3.1.4 for OS X 10.5 still appears to be version 3.1.3 build 3B134.
(0)
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Finrod63
22 December 2014
Version: 3.1.2
Is SMART Utility ready for Yosemite?
(0)
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2.5
JohnP7216
30 June 2014
Version: 3.1.2
This program reads only the internal drive on my macbook pro. It seems ok with that drive. I use a number of external drives for data and backups. It will not recognize the external drives although I did install their driver. As it will not recognize 90% of my drives it is of little use to me.
(0)
Show comments (2)
4
Just-Annutha-Dewd
29 June 2013
Version: 3.1.1
I've been using SMART Utility for some time now and am generally pleased with it. What I especially appreciate is the recent addition of the ability to install the SAT driver to enable monitoring of supported external drives. My biggest gripe is that it should be easier to initiate a short run vs long run. It'd make more sense to re-do the UI to run either of those from the main screen, not dive into a sub-menu titled "More Info", which itself doesn't really suggest that's where to go to run a more detailed analysis. Novice users would understandably be confused. My other gripe, which may seem trivial, is the menubar icon. It's hard to make out, being silver on the silver menubar. It also just doesn't look right up there, with a 3D style and sitting next to all the others that are black/white and flat. The icon is fine as a Dock icon, but it just fails on the menubar.
(0)
Show comment (1)
3
Pmyersjr
19 May 2013
Version: 3.1.1
Great App, I know there are similar apps but with this app, everything is under one hood and it's very easy to use.
(1)
5
Macinman
03 April 2013
Version: 3.1.1
I would Like to say, I just purchased this utility today. I have a white macbook that has held up for 6+ years, and is still going well. I had upgraded the stock toshiba 80 GB drive to a WD scorpio black 250 G B 5400 RPM about 6 years too (right after i got the macbook within a month or so). Recently i was having slow downs and odd behavior, I also own a copy of SmartReporter, which had been giving random I/O error reports for the internal drive, with no smart failing reports, and Apple's disk utility had always just said Verified,for Smart status. So I didn't know which tool was giving me accurate results based on drive activity. I knew that SmartReorter had a known bug a while back for giving false positives on i/o error check. so i kept that in mind when they'd pop up, and they kept happening while disk utility said nothing of interest. Then I started digging for smart failure articles and drive failure signs articles I have a computer background, I never got apple Certified, but I did get A+ certified and with the exception of the os and the rom of a mac the rest of the hardware is the same, so I was brushing up on skills since i hadn't had to do any major repair in years, i had gotten rusty. Anyway, I read an article about smart utility, downloaded the trial, and sure enough it confirmed the drive was failing. I wasn't sure how long it was going to hang in there since it was getting worse, so i ran next door picked up a Seagate momentus, 5400 RPM drive 500 GB for $65, and put it in the macbook all was good. The moral of this story is, the right tool gave me the right results in the right time frame to address the issue before things got worse. Just to avoid negative comments, i'm legally blind, i can't drive, office depot is right next door to my apartment complex and since the situation was somewhat serious it was an easy and quick way to get a replacement drive for a reasonable price, without risking damage in the mail, and the other advantage is if it fails within 14 days, i can walk on over and exchange it. Being I've always had better success with seagate drives then WD, i'm pretty confident that won't happen. I'm actually grateful and bless the WD that died, gave me as long as it did, usually WD drives for me have died right away. and i have an ATA wd drive about the same age in a 2.5 enclosure, and it died in a really funky way at about the same age too. Smart can't prevent failure but it usually, from what I've seen gives a fair warning to replace the drive in time to prevent loss. Hope this personal experience helps someone else :)
(2)
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1
Johnleh
16 December 2012
Version: 3.1
I'll upgrade my review if the developer updates this to work with SSDs, or if I find it's actually correct and my SSD is dying. Based on a handful of reallocated sectors (in an SSD!) it gave my main drive a FAILING warning. This caused me to waste hours researching, and some time in panic. Based on reports from other utilities and my research (which brought be full circle to the knowledge I started with before this stupid thing made me panic) I am quite well aware that SSDs do reallocate sectors, and it doesn't mean they are failing. They have many many blocks of extra capacity, for this purpose. It's called over provisioning, and it's common practice on any decent SSD. Mine certainly has over provisioning. I give this software, until an update to address SSD reads, a warning of FAILING. I wasted money on it, and I wasted time and panic.
(2)
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Psychos
03 August 2012
Version: 3.1
I will say this again: this is a simple GUI to smartmontools (http://smartmontools.sourceforge.net/). Only it costs $25, just as a GUI wrapper on otherwise-free software. On top of that, this utility does NOT use the included smartd to proactively monitor drives. (Nor does it poll them itself in any useful fashion.) No SMART utility is going to protect you against all drive failures, but you may get a warning of impending failure. This just isn't a good utility to watch those warnings, due to a poor polling setup. (Not to mention the price; I imagine others can point at various utilities that also use smartmontools.) But $25 for a utility that took many hours to build for free, just wrapper in a GUI that gives you text output? Ridiculous.
(5)
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I-Love-Techno
22 June 2012
Version: 3.0.2
I can't work out how to use this on external drives - does it work for this?
(0)
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3.5
Xenophile
09 May 2012
Version: 3.0.2
A very good and much needed utility for OS X. The GUI isn't bad, but given the price of this app I expect a bit more polish. For example, clicking on "show all" in the attributes section presents the user with a raw data dump, how about some organization and explanation of the data? How about a toolbar for rescanning drives, running tests, and saving disk information and reports? The testing window is light on info and the "cancel" button is always greyed out. These shortcomings would be easy to overlook on freeware or even a $10 utility, but for $25 I want a more robust feature set. I want to be convinced that the developer is invested in the app and will continue to improve it. If SMART Utility matures into a true professional app, then I'll gladly pay $25-$35 for it. Until then, the demo will serve my needs since I'm using it to evaluate used Macs for resale.
(1)
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Patoche
19 December 2011
Version: 3.0.2
Yes, Goldyn Chyld you can use it with SSD too...I use it that way here. Just have to tell that lastyl Smart Utility saved me a lot of problem with my datas, when my 3 To Hitachi looks to have problem with the Smart Status...I could just make a clone of it and 1 day later the HD was gone...ouch. I changed for a WD Green as the Hitachi was no more buyable at a correct price ;-( So, a big thanks to Smart Util and his developer.
(0)
Goldyn-Chyld
07 December 2011
Version: 3.0.2
Will this app only "work" with HDDs or can it be used equally with SSDs too?
(0)
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5
Thinking-Differently
14 November 2011
Version: 3.0.2
Some have suggested that this program might be cheaper. And perhaps they are right. However, after playing with the demo on a number of client machines and having it find issues that other utilities missed, I bought it. In fact I contacted the vendor about a special consulting license so that I could use it in my business. I do like a number of other utilities out there. SMARTReporter, for example, is an outstanding free utility. However, I found SMART Utility to uniquely solve enough frustrating problems that I found it worth my hard earned $$$.
(0)
alas!
22 July 2011
Version: 3.0.2
There appears to be some well deserved resistance to Smart Utility's $25 price tag. Developer feels that he's put a lot of work into SU and therefore the $25 price point is justified. It would seem likely that he's not getting the buying response that he would like. Developer dude, you would undoubtedly engender a lot more sales by lowering SU's price of admission by at least $10. You might want to petition MU to have Smart Utility at a featured discounted price for a day or a weekend. Anyway, Psychos's comment below makes some very cogent points. Read it if you haven't already.
(1)
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Syzzygy
08 March 2011
Version: 3.0.0
While SU offers some handy and useful info and renders it quite well, $25 IS too high,IMO; $10-$12, OK,OK,maybe as much as $15 would be an appropriate price point. I just won't buy it for $25.
(4)
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5
Mail3
08 March 2011
Version: 3.0.0
The only tool on the Mac I know that REALLY shows you the SMART parameters. If you're more into the topic you know that you really need to know those to be able to interpret whats going on. Google is your friend on this: http://en/wiki/Self-Monitoring,_Analysis_and_Reporting_Technology
(1)
Goldyn-Chyld
08 March 2011
Version: 3.0.0
Is this a free update for the existing users?
(0)
Show comments (2)
3
anonymous-camel-2414
03 March 2010
Version: 2.2.0
Nice application and does indeed show all the information (or so it seems) but it's not as useful as the price suggests. Would buy for $ 10, perhaps $ 15.
(7)
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B-Jefferson-Le-Blanc
02 March 2010
Version: 2.2.0
SMARTUtility provides a wide range of information, but you need to be a real geek to make good use of it. I'd say it's for techies only. The biggest issue I have with it is that you can set some of the parameters for drive failure notice, but what the correct settings might be is rather arbitrary. For instance, the number of bad blocks that constitute a problem. Even new drives usually have a few bad blocks (out of millions of blocks), and a reformatting a drive will quarantine bad blocks so they won't be used thereafter. So how many bad blocks are a sign of trouble? The only way to really know is to scan the drive at some point and then (re)format it. If the bad block count begins to rise significantly from that point, as revealed on subsequent scans, then you would have cause for concern. But unless you set a benchmark, you have know way of knowing if things are getting worse or not. As I said, for techies only. TechTool Pro 5 has an improved SMART test that benchmarks various categories of drive performance. But I had a drive fail recently despite passing this test with flying colors. So, though I wouldn't say SMART testing is useless, it's not foolproof, nor is it the only way to tell a drive has problems. In my case, a three year old Seagate drive in my Mac Pro gave out suddenly. No software repair utility would help; it was obviously a hardware failure. As it turned out, there was a sign of this impending failure that I did not recognize. Since it's uncommon, I'll mention it here. For some time my computer had been taking a long time to start up, spending quite a while with a white screen before the Apple logo showed up. I know now this was because the computer was having trouble mounting that failing drive - because when I replaced it, the startup slowdown went away. By the way, I had most of the data on the drive backed up so I didn't loose more than the time I spent troubleshooting the drive - and restoring the data to the replacement drive I installed. I would say, therefore, that the real smart utility is a regular backup. In any case, SMART tests don't work on external drives so their usefulness is limited in any case. All this doesn't mean, in my opinion, that SMARTUtility is a waste of money; it only means you need to know what you're doing to use it effectively.
(4)
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Shmk
24 June 2009
Version: 2.0.2
This program says by day old drive has all sorts of Old age issues
(2)
GeogProf
05 May 2009
Version: 2.0.1
People, this is not a new concept, it has been around and currently exists in around 45 pieces of software. Apple hasn't implemented it because it's largely useless. It's in DiskWarrior, TechTool Pro, DriveGenius, and pretty much every other disk utility. But it doesn't tell you anything's wrong with your drive until the moment it dies. It's crap.
(4)
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2
Cuchulainn
05 May 2009
Version: 2.0.1
Mac Pro, 4 hard drives all less than 6 months old. 3 Seagate / 1 Western Digital. Smart Utility reports 3 out of 4 hard drives are failing. Guess which 3? Yep, all 3 Seagate drives are failing according to Smart Utility. I suspect a bug in the algorithm reporting false positives for bad blocks for these drives. 1 Seagate ST31000340AS and 2 X Seagate ST3750640AS if it matters to anyone. Tech Tools Pro 5.0.4 reports no errors on any drives for SMART check or Surface Scan. SMART reporter also reports no problems. Hooked them up to a Windows box, SeaTools also finds zero problems. I give it a 2 overall. Good in concept, poorly implemented.
(3)
4
Marco114
29 April 2009
Version: 2.0
Works great. I am surprised Apple hasn't included this into the OS.
(1)
5
Dubbelish
22 March 2009
Version: 2.0
SMART Utility is better than both Disk Utility (which kept telling me my drive was fine even though OS was freezing while performing the scan) and it's also better than SMARTReporter (which is still giving me a positively verified drive sign up in the menu bar). I mean the nice little menu icon is great up there, don't get me wrong. But if the drive is failing and it doesn't tell you then what's the use. SMART Utility opened up and hit it clear as day: FAILING. Thanks for the nice software.
(2)
Borlox
28 January 2009
Version: 2.0
Anyone who uses this app should be aware that it tries to hide a timestamp in a preference file named "com.apple.services.plist", which is apparently supposed to look like a file created by the OS. It isn't.
(2)
Erbey
31 July 2008
Version: 1.2.2
I bought it but i don't use it any more i am not sure this soft is really working well
(1)
Neil-M
06 May 2008
Version: 1.2
This is quite funtional, but I am unsure why it is $20 better than these 2 freeware options; SMARTreporter (http://www.macupdate.com/info.php/id/14825/smartreporter) - sits in the menu, runs in the background, even emails you when a failure is detected. SMARTctl (http://www.macupdate.com/info.php/id/23777/smartctl) - sits in the menu and seems to give all the available SMART info.
(2)
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3
Akrobat
23 September 2007
Version: 1.0.3
So, the developer informed me about the Intel bug, fixed it and I've given it another go. Seems fine. Perhaps it is more efficient than SMART Reporter but that is something that has to be tested on a failing drive with both systems up and running. I'd buy this IF it was made into a menubar item. Otherwise I know I'll forget to launch it and I've already far too many windows open and startup items already. All in all not a bad item, so I'll review my 'review'.
(0)
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Wcitymike
21 September 2007
Version: 1.0.3
SMARTReporter: free, MacUpdate profile not full of complaints. SMART Utility: $20, MacUpdate profile *is* full of complaints. Wonder which way I'll be going.
(0)
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1
Akrobat
21 September 2007
Version: 1.0.2
Well, I DID try. Downloaded and opened on my Macbook... crashed. Opened it again... crashed, and again, crashed, and again... crashed. "It could be my Mac" I thought. I think I'll try SMART Reporter. Downloaded, opened it and hey! It works. Sooo, it wasn't my Mac and the paid app crashes while the free app works without a hitch. Am I missing something here?
(0)
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mrsidoric
16 June 2007
Version: 1.0
Based on downloading and testing most recent release -- many of the same criticisms are still valid -- locking up during 'updating SMART status' -- also the false positive for 'bad blocks'. Even so, I did license a copy. If the developer does finally deliver a solid product, meeting his proposed intentions -- it will be a universally REQUIRED product in this day of mass storage of valuable assets. I hope that the developer will pay close attention to this feedback -- and respond to the critique in later releases. Having read his technical credentials on his website, he should be able to produce a solid product we can all find beneficial and support. We hope so
(0)
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Felix01
04 June 2007
Version: 1.0.0B1
A limited release which stopped working on June 1, 2007. It's now June 4th and nothing has replaced the version which expired. Good thing I'm not really depending on this app and the developer. I'll take into consideration when deciding if it's worth a $20 shareware fee.
(0)
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Elijahg3
22 May 2007
Version: 1.0.0B1
My 10,000rpm Raptor drives (one is brand new) report that there have been a few bad block reallocations, and so this utility claims the drive is failing. The drive is not failing because of a few bad block reallocations. Hard disk drives get bad blocks occasionally, it's just miniscule impurities in the surface of the disk that don't quite operate correctly. People without much knowledge of hard disks may get scared and replace their disk even though there is absolutely no need to whatsoever. From the read me: "If it says FAILING, it will probably die soon" Based on bad blocks, this is NOT the case. There are billions of blocks on hard disks, and having a few go wrong is not an indication of it's impeding failure. Do not believe what this utility says based on bad blocks alone.
(0)
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Sivanamaom
22 May 2007
Version: 1.0.0B1
Does not work. Does not get past the "Updating SMART information" Window. Mac OSx10.4.9
(0)
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$25.00

3.3

App requirements: 
  • Intel 64
  • OS X 10.9.0 or later
License: 
PaidOne-Time Purchase

Downloaded & Installed 141,475 times

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Drive Genius
Powerful system utility.
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2
Upvotes
1
Total score
-1
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smcFanControl
smcFanControl
Control Intel Mac fans to make them run cooler.
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1
Upvotes
1
Total score
0
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