SMART Utility
SMART Utility
3.2.5

3.3

SMART Utility free download for Mac

SMART Utility

3.2.5
16 June 2019

Checks the hardware diagnostics system of hard drives.

Overview

SMART Utility is an application to scan the internal hardware diagnostics system of hard drives. SMART (Self-Monitoring Analysis and Reporting Technology) is a system built into hard drives by their manufacturers to report on various measurements (called attributes) of a hard drive's operation. The attributes can be used to detect when a hard drive is having mechanical or electrical problems, and can indicate when the hard drive is dying. This allows time to hopefully backup, and then replace the drive.

Run this utility once a week or more to ensure your HD, and your data, are okay!

Note: The demo runs for 30 days or 15 launches, whichever is longer.

What's new in SMART Utility

Version 3.2.5:
Fixed:
  • Bug where SMART Utility would display Time Machine snapshot volume
  • Nug where SMART Utility would display duplicate boot drives
  • Random crash on first launch
Updated:
  • To smartctl 7.0 which supports many more drives
  • To Sparkle 1.21.3
Other:
  • Enabled Hardened Runtime for better security
  • Removed Growl support for notifications

Join over 500,000 subscribers.

Subscribe for our newsletter with best Mac offers from MacUpdate.

45 SMART Utility Reviews

See all

Rate this app:

Most helpful

Nice application and does indeed show all the information (or so it seems) but it's not as useful as the price suggests. Would buy for $ 10, perhaps $ 15.
Like (6)
Version 2.2.0
qb
11 March 2019
Does anyone know if this developer post is from 2019? I just see a date of 8-Jan. I believe it is from 2019 and does indicate development is continuing. Yay! https://www.volitans-software.com/2019/01/the-future-of-smart-utility-2/ The Future of SMART Utility We wanted to give an update on SMART Utility. As you probably know, version 4.0 is much delayed. This lead to a re-evaluation of the roadmap. Version 4.0 was too ambitious for a single release, especially re-designing the interface. So the revise plan is this: Version 3.3 (out in a few weeks): Some new features and a bunch of bug fixes Version 4.0 (out in six months): Re-work the algorithm to better match todays drives Version 5.0 (out in one to two years): Re-design the interface
Like (1)
Version 3.2.4
1 answer(s)
Just-Annutha-Dewd
Just-Annutha-Dewd
24 March 2019
Well your own link has "2019" in it, so that should answer the question. I wouldn't hold out that much hope for the redesign though. He's been promising it for a few years now. The menubar icon alone hasn't matched the aesthetic of the OS in a long time now. But it is getting maintenance updates, soooo we'll see.
Like (1)
Mcr
29 December 2018
Users need to realize, this app (and similar ones) are dependent and/or influenced by several external factors.
1) The information returned by SMART is open to interpretation. In many cases, manufacturers themselves don't adhere to the same interpretation of what a particular data field means relative to their product. Ultimately, the manufacturer of the drive decides how and what to report back. There really isn't any enforcement to keep manufacturers in line as far as how their devices report.

Once data is returned, then SOME programs that try to calculate and give a 'probability' of failure or life expectancy rating.; these ratings need to be taken in context, or at least take with grain of salt. There are several industry studies which have shown that correlation between SMART data, predictions made based on the data and actual failure rates, is NOT that strong...possibly only correlated in less than a third of hard drive failures. I've had rotational drives during the initial 'burn in' period that show a increase in some of the so called negative indicators (bad sectors reallocated); but then 'settle down' and continue working fine for years afterwards with no increases. Don't get caught up too much in what SMART data is saying, unless you see a trend overtime. Your strategy should be to always have multiple backups of key data, so that when and if a drive fails, your data is safe, rather than obsessing about whether to replace a drive the first time it shows any negative indication.

2) Regards SSDs, the SMART standard and specification was developed at a time when all drives were rotational. When it comes to SSD/non mechanical drives, many of the data types/info defined by SMART are ambiguous at best, or meaningless, or at worse used by manufacturers to bolster their product when in fact they are irrelevant. Some makers have added on additional data fields to report so called 'SSD' specific info, but other makers are not required to use them, or if they do, don't necessarily report back the same data, since the definition is so open. Or worse, they will come up with a way to report back a lower value and use that in a positive spin, even the meaning of what that data really indicates has been redefined by them. A perfect example is data field 231, loosely defined as 'Life Left' for SSD drive. Remember, this is data reported back by the drive based on the manufacturer's interpretation. Using different criteria, Samsung drives might report back a million erase cycles remaining, but Crucial drives might use that field to report back that 50% reserved space is left.

So, in the case of Samsung, if the drive was rated for 2 million erases cycles, does that mean the drive has 50% of life remaining; on a Crucial drive, if you never get close to using the full capacity, 50% reserved space isn't really a factor; and what actually can be inferred from that as far as 'Life Remaining'. For example, when a manufacturer says this SSD drive reports 'zero' whatever, i.e. my product is good....well, actually ALL SSDs are going to report a zero for that data, or some might report '100', but so what, because it has no relevance for non-mechanical drives.

Most people I suspect pay particular attention to the 'reallocated bad sector' data; for rotational drives that makes good sense. For SSDs, the data has less relevance, because the standard hasn't evolved to define what that really means for SSDs, so manufacturer's have, of course, used this ambiguity to dictate the data returned to put their product in a better light. With modern SSDs and controlers using techniques likes over provisioning, trim, garbage collection, etc. it can be open to interpretation what a 'bad sector' is. Manufacturer's can take a problem 'memory location' and move it to the over provisioning bucket of memory, or mark it to never be trimmed or garbage collected....does that mean they have to report it as a 'bad sector'. It's straight forward to associate an actual physical location of a bad sector when it comes to rotational device; for a memory device, it's a little more complicated. A "sector of data" on a rotational drive is 512 bytes at a physical location on the disk. With SSDs the smallest block is 512 KB (a thousand times larger), made up of pages, which can be variable, but frequently 4KB. These pages may or not be continguous in the 'traditional' sense, and can CHANGE internally without any knowledge to the operating system. This happens when an SSD drive performs it's own internal clean up, provisioning and trim operations. Windows and macOS still see that 'sector' of your Word document as sitting at sector 143,245; but internally, the drive can move the location and composition of that block around.

3) In order to retrieve SMART data, requires either an interface that is capable of doing so, or a direct method to the drive which requires specific knowledge of the model and how to retrieve the info (without using the standard interface commands). Internal drives on a SATA bus have no issues, the SATA spec provides for the proper commands to query a drive and report back the data. External drives are dependent on the chipset of the enclosure as to whether the interface supports the SMART commands needed to query the drive and return the SMART data. Older USB external interfaces (as well as Firewire) did not have this pass through capability. Newer interfaces which support USB Attached SCSI (UAS) or USB Attached SCSI Protocol (UASP). do allow for SMART data retrieval, so when you buy an external drive or stand alone enclosure or drive dock, make sure it supports UASP

End of the day, it's fine we have programs that report back SMART info. For rotational drives, more useful, for SSD's, not as much. How you personally, or the programs that retrieve data, interpret what that data means, can be subjective, particularly when it comes to trying to predict failure or life expectancy (again, better for rotational, not so much SSDs). Generally speaking, mechanical devices physically wear down over time, so may be possible to see a trend and they 'fail over time'. Pure electronic components tend to not show 'symptoms' or degradation over time, for lack of a better word; they work until such time that they don't work. That's why I said it's better to be sure that you have multiple backups rather than obsess too much about whether a particular device is showing signs of failure or going to fail.
Like (1)
Version 3.2.4
1 answer(s)
Aargl
Aargl
30 December 2018
Here's another case of an app that appears as updated when in facts version 3.2.4 release date was 12/16/17, as mentioned at the dev's site...
Version 4 was planed for the end of 2016, as mentioned there: https://www.volitans-software.com/2016/05/smart-utility-upgrade-pricing-announcement/
Like
GeogProf
02 August 2018
No responses from developer to any queries. No updates since Oct. 2016 despite the MANY advances and changes in drive tech. No way.
Like (2)
Version 3.2.3
GeogProf
07 May 2017
THIS DOES NOT WORK ON SSDs (Solid State Drives) — IT ONLY WORKS ON HDDs (Hard Disk Drives, which Apple abandoned years ago in all MacBooks). Developer, please correct me if I’m wrong. If I’m not, do the right thing and indicate as much in your app’s introduction. BTW, DriveDX DOES work on SSDs. So now I have to abandon this $25 license and buy a $25 DriveDX license.
Like (2)
Version 3.2.3
3 answer(s)
Tony-Aguila
Tony-Aguila
02 September 2017
Not true. I have a 1-terabyte SSD and Smart Utility recognizes it. I have both Smart Utility and DriveDX and due to the advent of APSF both had problems recognizing the containers even though the devices themselves (HDs and SSDs) were recognized. Using Smart Utility, I simply reinstalled the SAT SMART drivers and, after a restart, all devices (drives) and containers (volumes) were listed as supported, including external drives. I converted all my HD volumes to APFS, except for Time Machine volumes, and they not only work fine, they work great!
Like
Aargl
Aargl
23 June 2018
I confirm it works on my (HFS+) SSD too!
By the way, current version is 3.2.4.
Like
Noraa
Noraa
07 August 2018
It doesn't work the NVMe SSDs unfortunately, a standard SATA SSD works fine.
Like (2)
qb
17 March 2017
I've owned a 10-pack license and used SMART Utility since mid-2010. I do IT support and offend diagnose the "spinning beachball" on client computers as bad drive sectors. I find it amazing that even a single bad sector, even if reallocated, can cause such problems but they do. S-U has provided the info I need to point out that a replacement HDD is needed and get the client back running smoothly. I look forward to the announced, but late, release of v4!
Like
Version 3.2.3
christian-schaffner
24 January 2017
25 bucks is way to much when you can find similar apps for US$0.99 in the Mac App Store. I would like to point out our own app SSD Health Check: https://itunes.apple.com/app/ssd-health-check/id1193940657?l=de&ls=1&mt=12 It is fast and delivers not only detailed statistics (like unexpected power losses, power cycles, failed read/write attempts and more) but also real time data like current temperature and more. Definitely worth a try, especially since it is 25 x times cheaper than similar other apps!
Like
Version 3.2.3
3 answer(s)
qb
qb
17 March 2017
You app is $1.99 and gets very poor reviews (although only 4) and poor ratings (6 total) to yield only 1.4 stars out of 5.

I've always had great results with SMART Utility. I do need to leave them a positive review here next.
Like (1)
Mcr
Mcr
29 December 2018
@christian-schaffner: going around and trashing your competitors with 1 star reviews is BS. MacUpdate is a forum for users AND developers; there is a professional and courtesy standard that most people naturally understand and live by on this forum; you apparently don't get it. So, know what I just did? I went to the MacUpdate page for SSD Health Check and posted a 1/2 star review, with an explanation of why, as I've explained here. There are sayings: "What's good for the goose, is good for the gander.", "What goes around, comes around."
Like (2)
STL@MacUpdate
STL@MacUpdate
29 December 2018
I would kindly ask @christian-schaffner to explain us such kind of behavior. Otherwise I have to remove feedback as it does not deserve to be here.
P.S. Totally agree with @Mcr
Like
GeogProf
22 September 2016
Is this useful for an internal SSD on a new MacBook Pro?
Like
Version 3.2.2
GeogProf
22 September 2016
Does this version work with Sierra?
Like
Version 3.2.2
A1D
07 March 2016
Of cause, the price is subjective thing. It reflects the amount of work from two side – How the App looks and How the App Works. It looks pretty dull, obviously no designers been involved in this. And developer doesn't bother about the UX / UI as well. Now about how it works. Compared to the competitors (DriveDx for example) it has limited functionality. I've tried to run the short test (App says 2 mins. approx) it never has been completed. I wouldn't conceder to buy this piece of software. Dramatically overpriced, lacks of design and functionality, bugged.
Like (2)
Version 3.2.2
Forn
22 February 2016
25$! Am I the only one who thinks that nearly all APPs are way too expensive? Earlier they cost 5$ maybe 10 $. Now they are 20$ to 40$ and so on… By far to expensive. Not real values.
Like (2)
Version 3.2.2