Disk Velox
Disk Velox
0.3.1

2.8

Disk Velox free download for Mac

Disk Velox

0.3.1
27 August 2004

Simple RAM disk.

Overview

Disk Velox is a very simple RAM disk creator.

What's new in Disk Velox

Version 0.3.1: No Terminal window opened.

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9 Disk Velox Reviews

Rate this app:

Anonymous
21 August 2004

Most helpful

I'd like to give this a try for I find it interesting, as I'm missing RAM disks on OSX, but I'd be happier if it wasn't a package. Perhaps it needs to, but I'm passing on this due to it, as uninstalling packages can be a pain in the ass.
Like
Version 0.1
Eric•Woehler
15 July 2012
Link for downloading app and for developer's site are both dead.
Like
Version 0.3.1
13 September 2004
OSX 10.3.5 AppleScript error : usage: newfs_hfs [-h | -w] [-N] [hfsplus-options] special-device options: -h create an HFS format filesystem (HFS Plus is the default) -N do not create file system, just print out parameters -s use case-sensitive filenames (default is case-insensitive) -w add a HFS wrapper (i.e. Native Mac OS 9 bootable) where hfsplus-options are: -J [journal-size] make this HFS+ volume journaled -G group-id (for root directory) -U user-id (for root directory) -M access-mask (for root directory) -b allocation block size (4096 optimal) -c clump size list (comma separated) e=blocks (extents file) c=blocks (catalog file) a=blocks (attributes file) b=blocks (bitmap file) d=blocks (user data fork) r=blocks (user resource fork) -i starting catalog node id -n b-tree node size list (comma separated) e=size (extents b-tree) c=size (catalog b-tree) a=size (attributes b-tree) -v volume name (in ascii or UTF-8) examples: newfs_hfs -v Untitled /dev/rdisk0s7 newfs_hfs -v Untitled -n c=4096,e=1024 /dev/rdisk0s7 newfs_hfs -w -v Untitled -c b=64,c=1024 /dev/rdisk0s7 DI_kextDriveGetRequest: failed (0x00000025) hdiutil: mount failed - no mountable file systems (1)
Like
Version 0.3.1
Anonymous
28 August 2004
There is also a RAM Disk Creator by www.donelleschi.com.
Like
Version 0.3.1
Anonymous
27 August 2004
I haven't benched it yet, but I do have some interesting info... THE APP WORKS FINE UNDER 10.2.8 Thought that was pretty cool ;)
Like
Version 0.3.1
Rod Paine
27 August 2004
As a quick FYI about RAM Disk performance as Peter has explained, here's what the Write speed looks like in my environment with a 800MHz B&W G3, using QuickBench to test the mounted RAM Disk volume. OS X 10.3.5    Write MBps Disk Velox -     17.2MBps RamDiskCreator - 42.6MBps 80GB WD Drive -  44.9MBps OS 9.2.2 ramBunctious -  130.5MBps FWIW, -Rod
Like
Version 0.3.1
Peter da Silva
27 August 2004
Doesn't actually do what you think. Modern UNIX doesn't really support the classical "ram disk", and you wouldn't want to use one in most circumstances: recently accessed files are going to be in RAM anyway, because UNIX uses all free memory as a cache for disk files. Instead, on UNIX, what you do is create a temporary file system in virtual memory. It gets paged in and out to your swapfiles like anything else created in RAM, and its only performance advantage is that the file system it's using (tmpfs) doesn't expect to survive a disk boot, it doesn't bother to make the extra disk writes that a regular file system uses to ensure that it's consistent and intact after a boot. This utility doesn't do that. What it does is create an un-named ".dmg" image... a virtual file system in memory, like the ones disk burner uses. Then it creates a regular file system inside it. It uses a script taken from the Darwin man page for "hdid", slightly modified to allow you to specify a different size and name. I can't imagine this actually being faster than a real file system on disk over the long term. Right after it's created, if you have a LOT of memory, it'll seem pretty fast, but as it gets paged to disk it'll get slower and slower. It's got all the overhead of a real file system, and it forces pages out of your disk cache, and all the clever algorithms the file system uses to improve performance will just lead to extra copies between swapfile and memory. It's useful as a way to mess around with disk images and to test software, I suppose, but it's not going to act like a classical RAM disk that sets aside a dedicated chunk of RAM and runs at RAM speed all the time.
Like
Version 0.3
1 answer(s)
Rod Paine
Rod Paine
27 August 2004
Peter, Thanks for the explanation, now I see why it doesn't act as earlier OS 9.x RAM disks did. Not much sense using it during file transfer speed tests, as I had intended, to eliminate potential slow disk drives impacting results. Regards, -Rod
Like
Version 0.3.1
Rod Paine
26 August 2004
This version works in my environment under OS X 10.3.4, but is about 30% slower than writing to disk, during an Ethernet file transfer. Quick tests show 6.1MBps to RAM Disk, versus 9.2MBps to disk. Is Disk Velox 0.3 requiring a lot of resources, which is slowing the write to the RAM Disk? -Rod
Like
Version 0.3
2 answer(s)
Anonymous
Anonymous
27 August 2004
Well, it is FAR faster on my configuration (10.3.5) than writing to disk and it doesn't look as if it is eating up a lot of CPU time or the like at all.
Like
Version 0.3
Anonymous
Anonymous
27 August 2004
Haha! And the whole point of a RAM disk is speed!
Like
Version 0.3
Anonymous
26 August 2004
GOOD and FREE - does what it says. :-)
Like
Version 0.3
Anonymous
21 August 2004
I'd like to give this a try for I find it interesting, as I'm missing RAM disks on OSX, but I'd be happier if it wasn't a package. Perhaps it needs to, but I'm passing on this due to it, as uninstalling packages can be a pain in the ass.
Like
Version 0.1
7 answer(s)
Anonymous
Anonymous
21 August 2004
Anything that has to install drivers is going to either be a package or is going to do the same thing as a package the first time you run it: install the startup code, the driver, any frameworks, etc... There's no way around it for any application like this. Even if it was a manual install you'd end up having to do a lot of work to pull it out again.
Like
Version 0.1
Anonymous
Anonymous
21 August 2004
Uninstalling packages can be done easily. http://krugazor.free.fr/software/desinstaller/DesInstaller.php
Like
Version 0.1
Anonymous
Anonymous
22 August 2004
If you hadn't been so short sighted, you would of downloaded the package, opened it and seen RIGHT THERE in the installer that it tells you the TWO files it installs. If you can't be bothered to possibly move two files, then maybe the world is just too hard a place for you to handle.
Like
Version 0.2.1
Anonymous
Anonymous
22 August 2004
Use Pacifist to look into a package and see where it is putting things if that is your (rightful) concern.
Like
Version 0.2.1
Carlo Alberto Cutolo
Carlo Alberto Cutolo
26 August 2004
No Installer in version 0.3.
Like
Version 0.3
Anonymous
Anonymous
26 August 2004
" If you hadn't been so short sighted, you would of downloaded the package, opened it and seen RIGHT THERE in the installer that it tells you the TWO files it installs." Well, if you weren't SO short-sighted you could possibly understand not every average user knows so much as to handle packages and their contents confidently. Although I've no trouble with them, I can perfectly understand the first poster's point of view, and I truly think it would certainly be better for the average user (and anyone in the end) if Apple didn't mind providing an uninstaller, though. Take a look at the suggestions by the other posters: they suggest/offer help instead of insulting. See the difference? I bet you don't! Anyway, I bet, too, you're afraid of the Terminal and that you've serious trouble socializing, so... -------------- That aside, this little app. is GOOD and FREE (and it doesn't seem to require the installer now, which I think is good after all). If the developer feels like giving it the "final touch", so that the Terminal doesn't show up and one hasn't got to type "exit" on it and then quit it, it will be even more rounded that it is now - and it is well-rounded now as far as I'm concerned. But even if he leaves it the way it is, I think it deserves five starts and a thank-you.
Like
Version 0.3
Peter da Silva
Peter da Silva
27 August 2004
Here's the code from "man hdid" to do the same thing: #!/bin/sh NUMSECTORS=128000 mydev=`hdid -nomount ram://$NUMSECTORS` newfs_hfs $mydev mkdir /tmp/mymount mount -t hfs $mydev /tmp/mymount The code in Disk Velox is slightly different, it uses "hdiutil" instead of "mount" to mount the disk, and it gets the sector count from the command line. You can see it in the Resources directory in the application.
Like
Version 0.3