John Wells
Downloads: 0
Posts: 37
Smile Score: +31
About Me
I am a Free member
Gender: Male


Visit Stats
Last Visit: 27 days ago
Member Since: 17 Jul 2008
Profile Views: 966

John Wells's Posts
Average Rating from John:
(4)

sort: smiles | time
burypromote
+3

iindigo reviewed on 22 Apr 2012
Not bad, but it very badly needs a Cocoa front end with a nice Mac-like layout. The default Qt-based UI just doesn't cut it. It might work fine on the amalgamated mess found on the desktop of a Linux user, but it sticks out like a sore thumb on Mac OS.

Also, many of the application's design decisions are strange; for instance, the three separate search fields present in the main window seem redundant and pointless when they could have just had a single context-aware search field.
[Version 1.0.1]



burypromote
+1
iindigo commented on 12 Nov 2011
I am currently using the original, free version, I find the new version to be a hard sell, being priced at $30. $15 would be a much more reasonable price point considering what this software does; I have paid much less for software that provides a far greater scope of functionality than HDD Fan Control provides.

I understand the need for income, as I am a Mac developer myself, the the way to get that income is through a greater volume of smaller sales, not a lesser volume of large sales.
[Version 2.2]



burypromote
+4
iindigo commented on 06 Apr 2011
To all those who keep asking, "Why don't developers provide versions outside of the app store?", I have an answer for you from a developers perspective. This doesn't really apply to free apps, only paid.

In order for developers to publish paid apps independently of the app store, they must provide their own serial-producing, serialization, and copy protection systems (which may also entail online activation). This is not easy or cheap by any stretch of the imagination. If the developer develops it himself, he runs the risk of his application being easy to crack. If he uses a pre-made system from another company, it's going to cost him money, plus he's going to have the hassle of keeping the framework updated. This doesn't even touch on how some of these third-party anti-piracy solutions are more invasive than they need to be and install files deep within one's system.

So imagine the delight of developers when they find out that if they go with the App Store as their method of distribution, they no longer have to deal with ANY of that? That alone is motivation to not provide paid applications in any other way.

Just thought I'd provide a little reasoning for why developers are moving in this direction.
[Version 1.0.1]


3 Replies

burypromote
+1

+31
iindigo replied on 06 Apr 2011
Yes, Apple takes a 30% cut, but that can be adjusted for (a little anyway) and in the form of a cut, not an initial investment. It's also that much more effort that can go into features that matter and stability improvements instead of an anti-piracy system.

This isn't even mentioning the value Mac App Store gives the developer in the forms of exposure/advertisement and payment system (companies like Kagi and Paypal take a cut themselves normally - the app store allows one to sidestep that).

Together, the 30% cut is made up for easily.
burypromote
-1

+31
iindigo replied on 06 Apr 2011
I'm sorry to hear that, but I personally do not plan to consider other options unless said options are as neat, tidy, and appealing as Apple's offerings. The fragmented approach of separate licensing, anti-piracy, and payment systems is an unnecessary obstacle for independent developers to have to overcome and honestly is becoming (or perhaps, already is) outdated.
burypromote
+1

+31
iindigo replied on 07 Apr 2011
Yes, I have used Linux before and am familiar with the concept of a package manager. Heck, I use MacPorts (commandline package manager) to install things on my Mac fairly regularly.

The Mac App Store is not a package manager, however. It's very similar in functionality, but in the end it's meant to a zero-config source for software. I love Macupdate, but the truth is that most Mac users are not aware of Macupdate and other sites like it; at college, I am constantly asked, "Hey, where can I get software for my Macbook?". Of course, I present them with both options. However, Apple's intention was to solve this problem by creating a singular, one-click, 100% trustable source for Mac software, both free and paid. The ability to add third-party repositories complicates things in that it could potentially allow insecure applications. As much as us power users may laugh at such a notion, it's a real problem when one considers the level of technical knowledge possessed by many new Mac users and the growing popularity of the Mac platform.

THAT SAID, I am totally in support of an OS X package manager with a polished, clean UI and slick operation. The Mac App Store needs some serious competition to keep it in check. But who will provide this alternative? Someone must step up to the plate and create it - simply complaining that the Mac App Store isn't open enough won't do anything.
burypromote
+5
iindigo commented on 28 Sep 2010
I haven't used MailMate, but it's nice to finally see a cocoa-based option, as opposed to the flurry of thunderbird derivatives with their kludgy XUL UIs.
[Version 0.9.3]



burypromote
+2
iindigo commented on 14 Mar 2010
At this point, the following things are keeping me from using this client:

- No per-torrent save locations. Want to save your torrent somwhere other than your default location? Sorry, you have to go into the prefs and change the location every time before opening torrents.

- One can't select which files you want --before-- starting the torrent

- The UI is missing several bits of polish that despite being very simple changes, the developers are inexplicably adamant in not implementing them.
[Version 0.9.3.2]



burypromote
+4
iindigo commented on 29 Mar 2009
I've been using the latest SneakyPeek build for a while now, and I gotta say, it's doing very nicely. I can't even really tell it's a beta.

One feature of OmniWeb that I've really come to love is the ability to apply custom stylesheets on individual pages - it gives me the power of the Firefox plugin "Stylish" without the nasty clunkiness and un-Maclike/"I'm faking it" feel that comes with Firefox.

Overall, the browser is great and I can't wait to see what version 6 holds in store.
[Version 5.9.1]



burypromote
+2
iindigo commented on 06 Feb 2009
My main beef with this program is its interface. It just feels far too cluttered and crowded, even if it really isn't that way; there are also a number of UI elements that look and act in a way that is unorthodox and are not quite Maclike.

Also, as mentioned by previous reviewers, it's a bit on the slow side. If one is expected to replace the Finder with this, I think it'd be expected that it be --at least-- as fast as the Finder currently is, preferably faster.
[Version 5.0.8]



burypromote
+5

iindigo reviewed on 21 Dec 2008
While I agree with the previous reviewer that Adobe Photoshop needs some competition, this is not it.

Ignoring missing features between the two, Pixelmator's UI is a mess thanks to its widespread use of HUD windows. Yeah, it looks nice and pretty when it's sitting on nothing but a blank desktop, but once you start multitasking and have other windows sitting behind it, its usability plummets astoundingly fast.

Also, while this may have changed, when I tried it several months ago it felt rather sluggish in comparison to Photoshop.

In conclusion, I find that Pixelmator is limited to novice/amateur use in dressing up their photos and such. It's not a tool for professionals or even intermediate hobbyists - for those purposes, even the open-source GIMP would fare better.
[Version 1.3.2]



burypromote
+6

iindigo reviewed on 18 Dec 2008
The UI for the Mac port of uTorrent is a mess, and if some of the threads on their Mac design boards are any indication, the developers are entirely too firm-footed on keeping the design as it is. They are against a large number of suggested changes to make it more Mac-like. It's as if they --want-- uTorrent Mac to remain looking like a sloppy Windows port or a crappy Java app.

It may be the best torrent client in the world as far as capabilities go, but if its developers aren't willing to put more effort in it, I won't use it. Transmission will remain my client of choice.
[Version 0.9.0.3b]



burypromote
+1
iindigo commented on 14 Mar 2008
Costs far too much to add what is free and standard in Cocoa to RB. Might be worth $15, at most.
[Version 1.0.1]



burypromote
iindigo had trouble on 01 Jun 2013
Unusable on OS X 10.8.3; it simply crashes shortly after being launched.
[Version 1.0]



burypromote
iindigo had trouble on 02 Dec 2005
Same trouble as above poster. Everything needed is installed correctly according to your site, yet it simply crashes on launch.
[Version 1.5.29]



Displaying 1-10 of 19
1 2 >
Displaying 1-2 of 2
Please login or create a new
MacUpdate Member account
to use this feature


- -