Jesper Søhom
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Biberkopf rated on 11 May 2012
[Version 1.3.0.536]



burypromote

biberkopf reviewed on 16 Sep 2009
I'm surprised and really sorry to read all the bad responses to FileMaker. And as someone who has followed the product closely since version 2 in 1989, I have to say: It's utterly unfair!

Some of you seem to judge the product as a cheap piece of shareware after 5-10 minutes testing. Others compare it to unnamed databases. Sure, you can get databases that will provide in- and output possibilities for free. I, too, use some of them for certain projects. But for differenct tasks than FileMaker. FileMaker is a full featured, extremely mature and reliable DB with a rock solid server foundation that you can build your buisiness on. Year after year. And with a developer environment, that hands you so many features and functions. If you add to that:

• client-server with up to 999 simultaneus users
• perfect cross-platform (Windows/Mac - alas, no Linux :-[)
• web-publishing (instant, customized or xml-feed)
• ligtning fast search in millions of records
• flexible and intuitive design tools to build user totally customizable interfaces
• send email from server or client via smtp
• webviewer that enables presentation of web pages inside FM
• tabs to cut down on presentation layouts
• very low learning curve for beginners
• direct SQL-access (read/write) to MySQL, MSSQL and Oracle
• excellent, flexible and unrivalled reporting (print or pdf)
• very compatible import/export posibilities
• script triggers
• customizable business logic
• many exellent, cheap plug-ins to further expand the power of FileMaker (provides a.o. system and internet integration)

To name just what spring to mind ...

In the late 90's I was giving up on FileMaker. The developer platform was not moving anywhere. But with the totally revamped version 7 in 2004 things changed. Since then every single update has been a major one. Check out the frequency here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filemaker#Version_history

Since 7 I have felt that the developers at FileMaker are actually listening and understanding what is important for FMP developers to get value to the customers - easy, fast and reliably.

FileMaker is not Oracle - and shouldn't be, but I bet it could often do the job of many existing Oracle installation much cheaper, much more flexible and with less developing time. Still, what is more interesting is, that at a very fair price you can get your business up and running on FileMaker AND grow and scale securely and with an incredible flexibility while growing your business.

FileMaker is a professional tool with amazing power if you understand and known it to its full potential.

Unless you want to build a transatlantic tunnel or send rockets to Mars FileMaker can help you.

However if you just want to keep track of your VHS-video-collection, don't bother.

I'm surprised and really sorry to read all the bad responses to FileMaker. And as someone who has followed the product closely since version 2 in 1989, I have to say: It's utterly unfair!

Some of you seem to judge the product as a cheap piece of shareware after 5-10 minutes testing. Others compare it to other unnamed databases. Sure, you can get databases that will provide in- and output possibilities for free. I, too, use some of them for certain projects. But for differenct tasks than FileMaker. FileMaker is a full featured, extremely mature and reliable DB with a rock solid server foundation that you can build your buisiness on. Year after year. If you add to that:

• client-server with up to 999 simultaneus users
• perfect cross-platform (Windows/Mac - alas, no Linux :-[)
• web-publishing (instant, customized or xml-feed)
• ligtning fast search in millions of records
• flexible and intuitive design tools to build user totally customizable interfaces
• send email from server or client via smtp
• webviewer that enables presentation of web pages inside FM
• tabs to cut down on presentation layouts
• very low learning curve for beginners
• direct SQL-access (read/write) to MySQL, MSSQL and Oracle
• excellent, flexible and unrivalled reporting (print or pdf)
• very compatible import/export posibilities
• script triggers
• customizable business logic
• many exellent, cheap plug-ins to further expand the power of FileMaker (provides a.o. system and internet integration)

To name just what spring to mind ...

In the late 90's I was giving up on FileMaker. The developer platform was not moving anywhere. But with the totally revamped version 7 in 2004 things changed. Since then every single update has been a major one. Check out the frequency here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filemaker#Version_history

Since 7 I have felt that the developers at FileMaker are actually listening and understanding what is important for FMP developers to get value to the customers - easy, fast and reliably.

FileMaker is not Oracle - and shouldn't be, but I bet it could often do the job of many existing Oracle installation much cheaper, much more flexible and with less developing time. Still, what is more interesting is, that at a very fair price you can get your business up and running on FileMaker AND grow and scale securely and with an incredible flexibility while growing your business.

FileMaker is a professional tool with amazing power if you understand and known it to its full potential.

Unless you want to build a transatlantic tunnel or send rockets to Mars FileMaker can help you - and fast. (Well, not quite, but almost... ;-] )

However, if you just want to keep track of your VHS-video-collection, don't bother.

I have no affiliation with FileMaker Inc, but I admit: I am a big fan and long time user as well as a prof. developer.
[Version 10.0v3]


3 Replies

burypromote

-1
biberkopf replied on 16 Sep 2009
Sorry about the repeated text.
As if it wasn't long enough already.
Can't seem to edit it after posting.
burypromote

-1
biberkopf replied on 16 Sep 2009
FWIW, FileMaker Inc claims:
»FileMaker Pro won 52 awards in the U.S., more than its next eight competitors combined, and 133 worldwide, in the past six years.«

http://www.filemaker.com/company/newsroom/news/product_reviews.html
burypromote

-1
Biberkopf replied on 25 Nov 2009
Nick, I agree that a stable FMP9 on Snow would be nice. And FMI are not too keen to go back and fix issues in old versions. In that sense, the act like a regular commercial software house. However, in my experience old versions have in general been quite compatible with a lot of new systems (on the mac, that is - I have little or no experience with Windows and Snow, yet). From what I hear of Snow Leopard and other programs incompatibilities, this is far from a trivial upgrade. The system has been thoroughly changed with 64-bit and the so called "Central Station" technology, so I think that it's quite understandable that FMP might have some issues on snow. It's Apple, not FMI, that's deciding to make a system upgrade. We don't have to go with snow right now. Maybe some of the issues are in Snow and not i FMP9?! I don't know, but as a developer, I would probably prefer, that FMI prioritize the current platform, FMP10, to keeping older versions uptodate with new systems.
Finally, and in all fairness, I think FMI has done a great job at keeping the various versions compatible so that you can actually mix version 7 to 10 quite freely and cross platform, with some feature restrictions of course. (To compare: You can't even open a InDesign or Illustrator CS4 in CS3, which should be much more simple to implement. But let's not open *that* discussion ;-] )
Still I agree: It would be nice ...
burypromote
Biberkopf had trouble on 11 May 2012
I had problems installing this plugin on Mac OS X 10.6.8 with iPhoto v.6.0.6.
The plugin folder was installed into /Library/Application Support/iPhoto/
Apparently, that doesn't work for my configuration. Instead I moved the plugin-folder into the iPhoto application package in the Application folder. This is how to do it:

1. Locate the iPhoto icon in your application folder.

2. Right click (or control-click) the icon to access the contextual menu for the iPhoto icon

3. Choose "Show Package Contents" from the contextual popup menu

4. You will now se a single "Contents" folder inside the iPhoto package. Open "Contents" and you will find the "Plugins" folder. Leave the window there.

5. Go back and locate the installed plugin folder called "PicasaWebAlbums.iPhotoExporter" which was just installed into your /Library/Application Support/iPhoto/Plugins/ folder.

6. Move the folder with the long name to the "Plugins" folder that you left open in step 4.

7. Close the windows and open iPhoto and go to Export. You will now see a Picasa tab.

At least, this worked for me.

Good luck.
[Version 1.3.0.536]



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