Russell Owen
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Posts: 60
Smile Score: +69
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+3

Reowen reviewed on 17 Jan 2014
I still like BBEdit, but after many years of use I'm switching to Sublime Text. The killer features in ST for me are:
- ST shows code errors as you type (with the SublimeLinter package). This is invaluable, especially for interpreted languages.
- ST has outstanding type-to-open-a-file. Unlike BBEdit, the dialog comes up quickly and the search algorithm is excellent (it favors the first letters of camelCase and underscore-separated words and filters out useless files).
- ST also has outstanding search for symbols in a project. (BBEdit also has support for this, but it's not fully automatic and I've never used it.)
- ST has very powerful multiple selection support.

That said, BBEdit has much better support and much better diff (even with plugins ST cannot match it). And both are excellent, extensible editors with powerful project support.

I hope the BBEdit team can add some missing features and speed up the program (especially startup and building the index for Open File by Name…; with a large project that can hang the program for a long time). I fear it is really falling behind state of the art.
[Version 10.5.7]


1 Reply

burypromote

+69
Reowen replied on 24 Jan 2014
I used Sublimerge for awhile and I agree it is powerful and well written (also well maintained). However, I strongly prefer BBEdit's diff because it is so easy to start a diff, so intuitive to use, and because it can be used as an external diff tool.

Sublimerge does more, but I found it unintuitive to use (primarily because ST does not support GUI controls for plugins), clumsier to launch, and it cannot be used as an external diff tool (I suspect it would be very hard for any ST plugin to support that).

My preferred setup is SourceTree for viewing git history (free, powerful and easy to use), the FileDiffs package in ST for diff (easy to start a diff, can delegate to an external diff tool), and BBEdit as my external diff tool for both. Also FileMerge as SourceTree's external 3-way diff tool for resolving merge conflicts (it also does 2-way diff, but I prefer BBEdit for that).
burypromote

Reowen reviewed on 17 Jan 2014
I recently switched from BBEdit to Sublime Text (ST), after using BBEdit for years and trying Sublime Text 2 and 3 beta for many months. The main reasons I am switching to Sublime Text:

- ST shows code errors as you type (with the SublimeLinter package). This is invaluable, especially for interpreted languages. (The C/C++ linter does not work for me because it cannot find my header files: ST cannot see changing environment variables, and my projects use a package management system that manipulates environment variables).

- ST has outstanding type-to-open-a-file. Unlike BBEdit, the dialog comes up quickly and the search algorithm is excellent (it favors the first letters of camelCase and underscore-separated words and filters out useless files).

- ST also has outstanding search for symbols in a project. (BBEdit also has support for this, but it's not fully automatic and I've never used it.)

My main worries about switching from BBEdit:

- Poor support. There is a forum, and questions are sometimes answered by users, but I see few signs that bugs are acknowledged or addressed. ST doesn't even have a formal bug tracker, at least one that is public (though the community has set one up).

- The built-in diff is lame compared to BBEdit, and packages cannot fully compensate because they cannot support running diff from the command line (e.g. to support 3rd party tools such as SourceTree) nor offer useful GUI controls.

Common features include:

- Both have very good project management, with minor advantages both ways.

- Both have very good multi-file search, with minor advantages both ways.

- Both can be enhanced with scripts or macros.

- Both support columnar selection.

Overall, I think both are excellent and both are a bargain if you do a lot of coding.
[Version 2.0.2]



burypromote
+1
Reowen commented on 13 Dec 2013
I tried it out, and project support seemed quite weak compared to BBEdit and Sublime Text.

To Chocolat a project is just a directory. By contrast, BBEdit and Sublime Text (ST) both allow an arbitrary set of folders in a project, which one can save and reopen later, restoring state (including which files are open). Both allow one to easily search an arbitrary subset of folders of a project (Chocolat can restrict search to a one folder, though it's somewhat hidden).

Also with Chocolat one can too easily leave the project dir and it's hard to get back (there's a menu to navigate up, but no obvious way to return).

I work on several big collaborative projects and I find strong project support very important. For smaller projects it's not needed and Chocolat might be a fine choice.
[Version 2.1]



burypromote
+1

Reowen reviewed on 31 May 2013
Works well for me.

I only wish it came with updated release notes (the included notes stop at version 3.5) and that there was notification of updates. I'd cheerfully pay for it. The only other IPsec client I know of is VPN Tracker, which is overpriced but does work.
[Version 4.0b1]


1 Reply

burypromote

+69
Reowen replied on 22 Jul 2013
4.0rc does include updated release notes. Yaay! I had one installation bobble on two machines (both MacBook Pros running 10.8.4, both upgrading IPSecuritas from 4.0b2 to 4.0rc. The new version would not run, claiming it could not connect to the daemon. In both cases the following fix worked (after simply rebooting did not):
* Reboot into safe mode (hold down the shift key after the startup chime)
* Drag a new copy of IPSecuritas (4.0rc) into your Applications Folder
* Run the application; it should ask for your password and should start up just fine. I did not try to connect.
* Go to preferences and select "Show Status in Menubar" if you want that. The menu icon should show up.
* Reboot normally
At this point it should all be fine.
burypromote
+3
Reowen commented on 28 Jun 2012
I normally use LaunchBar, but decided to give Alfred a try. After a month or so I switched back. On the whole I was happy with Alfred, but I found that LaunchBar was much better at choosing the item I wanted based on what I typed. I also appreciated being able to type cmd-I in LaunchBar to get info on the found item; I could not find any way perform this action in Alfred--without the power pack--though I may have missed something there.
[Version 1.2]



burypromote
+1

Reowen reviewed on 07 Jun 2012
I like SpiderOak because it is quite flexible, has a great security model, and makes it easy to publicly share files. However, like others, I do find the desktop application rather clumsy and not very Mac like (no menu bar, no command keys for copy/paste though fortunately those commands are available via a contextual menu!).

I use SpiderOak on my mac for backup and to share some fairly static files. For the shared files, I appreciate the fact that they will automatically be updated if I change them on my Mac.

I use DropBox for files that change frequently and that I want to pass from one computer to another.
[Version 4.5.9941]



burypromote

Reowen reviewed on 11 Apr 2012
Very useful for preventing sleep while giving presentations, watching videos or downloading large files. It does exactly what I want and does it well with a nice simple user interface and no problems.
[Version 1.1.1]



burypromote

Reowen reviewed on 03 Apr 2012
SpamSieve does a wonderful job filtering out spam. Training is easy for those few messages that are mis-identified and it is easy to review spam to make sure no good messages got through.

The program is rock solid, support is first-rate and updates (for improved accuracy) come regularly.

My one minor complaint is that there is no contextual menu for marking a message as spam or not spam. Having to go the main menu for this (or having to memorize an obscure pair of accelerator keys) is a bit clumsy. But the accuracy rate is so high that it is no big deal.
[Version 2.9]



burypromote
+6

Reowen reviewed on 10 Feb 2012
One of my must-haves. I find this complements LaunchBar (or Quicksilver) quite nicely. I use DragThing to organize frequently used folders and files and LaunchBar or the Dock to launch apps. (And Spotlight to find less frequently used files).

I also find it very stable, the support is excellent support and I think it is a great value.
[Version 5.9.9]



burypromote
+2

Reowen reviewed on 11 Jan 2012
The best ftp client I've found. It has lots of useful features, including:
- Lots of ways to view files
- Synchronization
- Drop files on subfolders to upload them there
- Drag files from one host to another
- Excellent support for remote editing (including useful help if I attempt to open the same file twice).
It is also very stable and has amazing customer support. Worth every penny and then some.

There are a few minor things I wish were different, including:
* Each new connection window opens directly over the current connection window, making it needlessly hard to tell them apart (or even tell there are multiple connections open).
* The UI for synchronization is a bit clumsy.
* There is no menu of bookmarks in the "new connection" dialog box. The bookmarks menu is a fine way to get a new connection, but sometimes I start with cmd-N (old habit from Fetch) and then have to cancel out. I'd really like to be able to open a bookmark from the keyboard (e.g. cmd-N and then start typing).
[Version 1.8.8]



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