Ludio
Downloads: 0
Posts: 13
Smile Score: +28
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Model: iMac 27"
Processor: Intel Core i3
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Ludio's Posts
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burypromote
+4

Ludio reviewed on 28 Sep 2012
Path Finder is a stand-alone app that replaces Finder (although it warns that the setting to quit Finder when Path Finder launches may cause Time Machine not to work properly). It’s very customisable, with many options and features. It has excellent and welcome features for tagging files, quickly selecting all files of a specified kind, detailing file-access control and searching for files, but I don’t need, within a file-browser, to run Terminal, or an image-editor, or a subversion utility, or drawers that open at the edges of the window to do what there isn’t enough room for in the main interface. I can do all these with Apple apps that are part of the OS, or with equally capable free or cheap apps. It’s a question of whether or not you want to be able to do all this from a single app, or, like me, prefer a file browser to stick to its own business of file-browsing and leave the rest to other apps. For those who prefer the former, PathFinder is ideal, but for me, it’s as unnecessary as a single media app comprising iTunes, iMovie, iPhoto and Quicktime Player.

For me, although Path Finder is impressive in it’s capabilities, it's bloated. The greatest beauty is in simplicity, so I like the uncomplicated, simple and minimalistic style that make Apple’s apps, and those of many third-party developers, one of the reasons I prefer Apple to Microsoft.

After comparing Path Finder, TotalFinder and XtraFinder, I've chosen TotalFinder, but I've given Path Finder a reasonably good rating, because what it does, it does well, and it wouldn't be fair to give a bad rating to a good product just because it isn't what I want it to be. For me, it's excessive, but my 'excessive' might be your 'comprehensive'.

There's a fully-functional trial version that can be used for thirty days before you decide whether or not to buy it.
[Version 6.1.1]



burypromote
+11

Ludio reviewed on 28 Sep 2012
I’ve installed XtraFinder (288 KB) and the fully functional trial versions of TotalFinder (329 KB; offering 14 days’ trial) and Path Finder (75.1 MB; offering 30 days’ trial), because I want a file-browser that does more than Finder, chiefly tabbed browsing and dual panels, and, not knowing which to pick, decided to try them out together.

Path Finder is a stand-alone app that replaces Finder (although it warns that the setting to quit Finder when Path Finder launches may cause Time Machine not to work properly). It’s very customisable, with many options and features. It has excellent and welcome features for tagging files, quickly selecting all files of a specified kind, detailing file-access control and searching for files, but I don’t need, within a file-browser, to run Terminal, or an image-editor, or a subversion utility, or drawers that open at the edges of the window to do what there isn’t enough room for in the main interface. I can do all these with Apple apps that are part of the OS, or with equally capable free or cheap apps. It’s a question of whether or not you want to be able to do all this from a single app, or, like me, prefer a file browser to stick to its own business of file-browsing and leave the rest to other apps. For those who prefer the former, PathFinder is ideal, but for me, it’s as unnecessary as a single media app comprising iTunes, iMovie, iPhoto and Quicktime Player.

While Path Finder is an alternative to Finder, Total Finder and XtraFinder are plugins that work together with it. Rather than launch them yourself at login, it’s more efficient to add them to your login items to launch automatically at startup. They have some of the same features, functionality and options as Path Finder and each other, with tabbed browsing and dual-pane mode. In each, tabs can be re-ordered, and a tab can be dragged from a Finder window to create another window or from one Finder window to another.

I like the default size of the Finder window, but both plugins change it when using dual-pane mode. XtraFinder doubles the size to attach a second Finder window (which is fine, but I might as well open a new window). However, on closing this second pane, the first retains the size of the two together. Going into dual-pane mode again doubles this already-doubled size. Furthermore, new windows will now open at this larger size. (There is also a dual-window mode, which presents two Finder windows that fill the screen together, but I can’t see the point of that when dual-pane mode is available.)

Dual-pane mode in Total Finder presents, not a doubling of window-size, but an extension of it by about a quarter, and puts a sidebar at the right-most side of the window. I much prefer this to XtraFinder’s appending of a second pane to the window. Like XtraFinder, TotalFinder retains the extended size, but I can live with that, because, unlike XtraFinder, it isn’t excessive; also unlike XtraFinder, opening dual-pane mode again doesn’t extend the window more.

What TotalFinder has that XtraFinder has not is a ‘visor’, which slides up from the bottom of the screen at a key-command and serves as a quick-access Finder window with the same functionality as a normal TotalFinder window: in particular, tabbed browsing and dual-pane mode. It can be set to be customisable in size and position, and it can be ‘pinned’ to keep it visible, or ‘unpinned’ so that it will slide away on command or when you click in a different app. However, it has a frustrating flaw: until opening the visor for the first time, clicking on the Finder icon in the Dock opens a Finder window as normal, but after the visor has been opened once, clicking on the Finder icon in the Dock opens the ‘new window’ in a tab in the visor, not in a new window that is separate from the visor.

Path Finder is impressive in it’s capabilities, but bloated. The greatest beauty is in simplicity, so I like the uncomplicated, simple and minimalistic style that make Apple’s apps, and those of many third-party developers, one of the reasons I prefer Apple to Microsoft. I like XtraFinder, but not that it retains an over-large window size on switching from dual panes to a single pane. I like TotalFinder more, because it doesn’t have this flaw, but one use of its visor, which I like, prevents the opening of a new Finder window from the Dock. This can be remedied by de-activating the visor in the preferences, but that would be a shame.

My ideal file-browser would have, from Path Finder, Total Finder and XtraFinder, tabbed browsing and dual-pane mode, but with the sidebar at each end that TotalFinder has. From Path Finder, it would have the tagging feature and the greater information and options available in the Get Info panel. It would have the look of TotalFinder and XtraFinder (which are similar in appearance). It would have the visor of TotalFinder, but open a new Finder window separate from the visor when clicking on the Finder’s Dock icon. It would have the more intuitive window-sizing of TotalFinder that is lacking in XtraFinder. Finally, it would have what none of these products has: the ability to appear on top of an app that is being used in full-screen mode, and the option in the right-click menu to re-open all or selected closed tabs (as in Firefox), as well as some other features of web-browsers’ tabbed browsing.

Although the developers of PathFinder, TotalFinder and XtraFinder are to be congratulated, on balance I’ve decided to go with TotalFinder. It’s annoying not to be able to open a new Finder window from the Dock after one use of the visor, but I’ll put up with the minor inconvenience of clicking on the desktop to make Finder the active app and pressing ⌘N.
[Version 1.4.3]


1 Reply

burypromote
+1

+28
Ludio replied on 28 Sep 2012
Unfortunately the 'Freelance Windows' option doesn't make any difference. Thanks for the suggestion, though. You are right that clicking on the Dock's Finder icon when the visor is up makes the visor slide away, but that isn't quite my issue.

If the visor hasn't been activated, clicking on the Finder icon in the Dock opens a new window, not the visor. So far, so good. But if the visor has been used and then put away, clicking on the Finder's Dock icon will not now open a new window, but opens the visor again.

In short, whether or not a click on the Finder's Dock icon opens a new Finder window or the visor depends on whether or not the visor has already been used.

I should clarify that this isn't so much a complaint as an observation of a quirk that I would rather were different.
burypromote
+2

Ludio reviewed on 08 May 2012
(I have also posted this on the App Store.)

On 31 July 2011, I posted a comment on 1Password’s page at MacUpdate.com stating that, because of the problems people were having at that time regarding 1Password’s integration with Lion, I wouldn’t be buying it until those problems appeared to have been solved, but that buy it I would, not only because it appeared to be just the kind of app I was looking for, but also because I was greatly encouraged by the excellent customer care exhibited on this site.

Well, it took a while, but I finally got round to buying it from the App Store last week. Below is a list of all the problems it has given me:


Did you miss them? Here they are again:

[Tumbleweed rolls by.]

I had been using Apple’s own Keychain Access, but was frustrated with its limitations. 1Password proves to be a superb alternative. I shan’t go through all the features; suffice to say that they are listed in the blurb in the App Store and on AgileBits' website, and that I am very pleased with all of them.

1Password motivated me to be more organised. I’d intended to use it as an app in which simply to store existing passwords for website accounts, and not use Keychain Access for that anymore, and I’d unwisely been using a single password for many accounts, but 1Password’s organisational features must have had an effect on me to such a degree that I used its customisable password generator to generate many long and complex passwords to replace my existing one, so that each account now has its own complex password; and I created some new email accounts for different types of website, such as shopping, gaming and social, so that each category of site sends its emails to the corresponding email address. This has all taken a few days, and there were many incoming emails from websites advising me of changes I’d made to my account profiles, but in the end I’m now far more secure and organised than I would be if I hadn’t bought this app.

I’ve been fortunate in not having anything bad happen with this app, but I’m confident that support from AgileBits would be prompt, helpful and friendly; they seem genuinely to care that their customers are not disappointed. Living in the UK, I’m not used to good post-sale customer support, so I value it (having had it from only three companies in recent years: my internet provider, Apple and now, if I should need it from them, AgileBits). AgileBits seems to understand that it is in its commercial interest to ensure that its customers are happy with its product.

Some reviewers have complained about problems using 1Password with Google Chrome, but there's an explanation on AgileBits' support site with an account of what has been and is being done to remedy the problem. It’s always advisable, before buying an App to search online for any issues that people have with it, and to visit the developer’s website. What we need before posting a review of a product is patience; knee-jerk reactions are unworthy of the name ‘review’ (just look at the ‘reviews’ in the App Store in the first couple of months following Lion’s release).

If I could change one thing (one minor thing), it would be for the lock/unlock sounds to be more audible, as I can barely hear them. They sound like the same sounds used by the system when clicking on the padlock symbols in System Preferences, but they are very quiet in 1Password. This isn’t a problem, of course; it's just that, when everything else is perfect, the one tiny thing that isn’t is more noticeable.

If you are hesitant about buying, visit AgileBits’ website, download the fully functional app for a free 30-day trial, and go through the tutorials at http://help.agilebits.com/1Password3/1password_getting_started.html.

I hope you will be as satisfied as I am. Thanks, AgileBits, and keep up the good work.
[Version 3.8.19]



burypromote
+4
Ludio commented on 31 Jul 2011
I don't have 1Password, but it's the kind of app I'm after. I shan't try it yet, until the issues raised are resolved, but I wanted to comment on how encouraging it is that a developer takes time to respond here to people's concerns and problems. I had been wavering over whether or not to get this app rather than one that might do a reasonably good job for less or nothing, but the customer care exhibited here has inclined me more towards 1Password. When the problems are solved, I'll very likely get it.
[Version 3.7.0]



burypromote
+3

Ludio reviewed on 10 Jul 2011
I wanted all my 6½ thousand music tracks on iTunes to be at the same volume level, and had started listening to them individually and adjusting each one. This would take for ever, so I looked for an application that would do it for me, and iVolume seemed ideal.

I set it to adjust all tracks to 93db. Although it adjusted all the tracks, they were audibly still at different volume levels. Many of the originally quieter ones, such as those from the 1930s, although now louder, were still too quiet and certainly not at the same volume level as louder tracks.

To overcome this, I created folders in iVolume, each with its own volume adjustments, and started listening to each track to determine which ones should go into which folders to bring all tracks to about the same volume level. It was several weeks before I realised I was doing again what I had been doing in the first place before buying iVolume to do it for me.

I want an application that will adjust all my music collection so that all tracks play at the same volume level such that, for example, Bing Crosby plays at the same volume level as Metallica without my having to adjust the volume. iVolume is not that application.

Finally, there doesn't appear to be a way to remove all iVolume's adjustments and reset mps3 to their original volume levels.
[Version 3.6]


1 Reply

burypromote
+2

+28
Ludio replied on 23 Dec 2011
Hi Mcr. Thanks for your reply, but I had made sure to follow the instructions to reset the volume setting for all tracks to 'None', and made sure 'Sound Check' was on, before making adjustments with iVolume.

After shelving iVolume, I looked for an alternative. I found and tried Smart Gain. There's no way to undo the changes made with Smart Gain, so I made a copy of some of my iTunes library and set about adjusting the volume on the copied tracks. It works well, and the waveform display of the the volume is very useful, as is the feature whereby the volume level of selected parts of a single track can be adjusted, but every track in the library would have to be adjusted individually.

Thanks again for your reply, and thank you also for recommending dougscripts.com.
burypromote
+1
Ludio commented on 14 Jun 2011
Oh dear! I'm a Firefox user, and Wallet appears to be compatible with only Safari and Google Chrome. I don't use Safari, because its tab settings are limited; and I haven't tried Google Chrome. Maybe I should. Firefox is a very popular browser, so the developer really ought to include it.
[Version 3.2.3]



burypromote
Ludio commented on 03 Jan 2011
This sounds like exactly what I'm looking for, so I downloaded and installed it. When I clicked on it in the Preferences pane, it showed me the following message:

'You can’t open Startup Sound preferences because it doesn’t work on an Intel-based Mac.'

Disappointing.
[Version 1.1b3]


1 Reply

burypromote

+28
Ludio replied on 03 Jan 2011
I commented too soon. I've now been to the developer's site, downloaded and installed the latest version, and it works.
burypromote

Ludio reviewed on 15 Feb 2010
My Trash wouldn't empty because it contained files that I, the administrator, somehow didn't have authority to delete. Also, following a re-installation of the operating system and a deletion of backed up files I no longer needed, there were over 56,000 items in it, and the emptying took too long just to delete the first item.

I downloaded Super Empty Trash 2.3, and it deleted all but one item from the Trash, for some reason, but I was able to delete that in the normal way.

If you have either of these problems, I recommend this App heartily, and with gratitude to its developer, Marco Balestra. The best things are simple, and with few features, this App is no more than it needs to be and easy to use; and because it's free, it's excellent value.
[Version 2.3]



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