oXygen
oXygen
21.0

5.0

oXygen free download for Mac

oXygen

21.0
22 May 2019

Java XML editor.

Overview

Oxygen is an XML Editor, XSLT/XQuery debugger and profiler with full Unicode support. It supports visual XML editing driven by CSS stylesheets. It offers a powerful code insight that can follow a DTD, Relax NG, or an XML schema, or even can learn the structure from a partially edited document. XML and XSL documents can be easily associated one with the other, and the transformation results can be viewed as text or HTML. Oxygen provides a visual schema editor for W3C XML schema and Relax NG schema designed to simplify the development and understanding of the schema files. Oxygen validates XML, XSL, XQUERY, FO, XSD, RNG, RNC,NRL, DTD, Schematron, WSDL, and CSS content, reporting errors with description and line number information and marking them in the document when Validate as You Type is enabled.

What's new in oXygen

Version 21.0:

The release of version 21 of Oxygen XML Editor adds numerous new features, updates, and improvements to the already robust, industry-leading XML editing application. The primary focus for this major release was to evaluate user requests for improvements and additions, implement as many of them as possible, while preserving the reliability, stability, and performance requirements that the XML community has come to expect from the Oxygen suite of products.

Full changelog available here.

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5 oXygen Reviews

Rate this app:

Billyfuster
06 July 2008

Most helpful

This is a fantastic and essential editor for anyone working with XML and its related technologies (XSLT, XQuery, XML Schemas, RelaxNG, DTD). If you work with TEI, DocBook, or DITA, oXygen ships with up-to-date versions of these schemas and templates. oXygen natively understands (and learns) XML structures, so you'll notice it suggesting element and attribute values as you edit. It's also an excellent XHTML, CSS, and plain text editor. Its built-in ability to browse and query native XML databases (such as eXist and Mark Logic), SQL databases, and SVN repositories make it a tool for the power user. While Java-based and thus visually non-Mac in UI, the developers are listening to the requests of mac users in their forums. Like many specialized tools, oXygen's many views and palettes let you customize your UI to expose only what you need to get your job done. Lastly, don't let the price scare you away! There price listed here is for the professional commercial license. The personal/academic price is much lower (currently $48). The fact that this license is cross-platform means that if you have a windows machine you can install it there too and get work done. Since I purchased in November, two point releases have come out - 9.2 and 9.3 - and I've been impressed with the steady progress they've made. 9.3 is able to open MS Office XML files in their zipped state from within oXygen. They're also adding more options for WYSIWYG-like XML editing, which make it nicer to edit XML files (and to train XML newbies to edit XML files). My only problem cropped up when I began editing a fairly large XML file - I started getting out of memory errors. This was solved by a quick edit of a config file (oxygenmac.sh) in the oxygen directory... Java apps apparently can't adjust their memory as needed as native mac apps can. But the steps for doing this were well laid out in the included documentation.
Like (1)
Version 9.3
Billyfuster
06 July 2008
This is a fantastic and essential editor for anyone working with XML and its related technologies (XSLT, XQuery, XML Schemas, RelaxNG, DTD). If you work with TEI, DocBook, or DITA, oXygen ships with up-to-date versions of these schemas and templates. oXygen natively understands (and learns) XML structures, so you'll notice it suggesting element and attribute values as you edit. It's also an excellent XHTML, CSS, and plain text editor. Its built-in ability to browse and query native XML databases (such as eXist and Mark Logic), SQL databases, and SVN repositories make it a tool for the power user. While Java-based and thus visually non-Mac in UI, the developers are listening to the requests of mac users in their forums. Like many specialized tools, oXygen's many views and palettes let you customize your UI to expose only what you need to get your job done. Lastly, don't let the price scare you away! There price listed here is for the professional commercial license. The personal/academic price is much lower (currently $48). The fact that this license is cross-platform means that if you have a windows machine you can install it there too and get work done. Since I purchased in November, two point releases have come out - 9.2 and 9.3 - and I've been impressed with the steady progress they've made. 9.3 is able to open MS Office XML files in their zipped state from within oXygen. They're also adding more options for WYSIWYG-like XML editing, which make it nicer to edit XML files (and to train XML newbies to edit XML files). My only problem cropped up when I began editing a fairly large XML file - I started getting out of memory errors. This was solved by a quick edit of a config file (oxygenmac.sh) in the oxygen directory... Java apps apparently can't adjust their memory as needed as native mac apps can. But the steps for doing this were well laid out in the included documentation.
Like (1)
Version 9.3
Nedron
13 January 2006
This is arguably the best XML editor I've used for a number of reasons. I had previously used Emacs (via psgml) for most of my needs, but occasionally tried GUI editors as they became available. The first requirement is that it run on each platform I use (OS X, Linux, Solaris). Because it is Java-based, will run on any platform that has a native Java interpreter. Additionally, the built-in templates for various schemas make it incredibly easy to create new documents, etc. Particularly of interest to me, since much of what I do is documentation, is 's DocBook integration. Also of note is the new inline checking, etc. The price seems high to some, but given that the license includes the right for me to run it on any Java-enabled platform, the price is very good. I've rarely purchased an app where I had no regrets about some portion of the product I purchased. is one such app which I can recommend wholeheartedly.
Like
Version 7.0
Anonymous
17 November 2003
Oxygen may be a full featured XML editor, but I think they have spent a lot of time making an editor than can handle multiple file types versus an all around excellent XML editor. I am used to XMLspy, on windows, and a coupld features it has Oxygen would be well advized to implement. The tree view in XMLspy for instance is lightyears ahead of Oxygen's. Over all, for a crossplatform XML editor, it's great thought. Mostly minor things, and the speed could use a boost as well.
Like
Version 2.0.4
Mathias Wiegard
09 May 2003
Sorry. I don't understand the prior review. Oxygen has the best price/value-relation U can get for a full (yes, full!!) xml-editor. It supports dtd, xml schema, xsl-fo and has an excellent structure recoginition. It also has code-completion, auto-formatting features, it has a tree-editor and it's multi-lingual. U can easily manage complex projects. And I HAVE complex projects to do. For Mac-User who want to do XML it's a must. For everyone else, who don't like to spend a hundreds of bucks for an XML-editor it's the first choice, too.
Like
Version 2.0.1
1 answer(s)
Fynvola Le Hunte Ward
Fynvola Le Hunte Ward
04 February 2004
I see a lot of enthusiasm in the last commentator, but I would like to ask two questions. (I use XML Spy and XML Writer at work on Windows, and have Oxygen at home on my Macintosh powerbook). (1) Why doesn't Oxygen on the Mac have the line numbers option; and (2) Why doesn't it have a built-in browser on either platform? This is a very simple addition which all the others have....
Like
Version 3.0
153957
09 May 2003
eeeh, not that usefull...
Like
Version 2.0.1