Final Draft
Your rating: Now say why...

(2) 0.5

Industry-leading screenwriting software.   Demo ($249.99)
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Final Draft allows you to use your creative energy to focus on the content; let Final Draft take care of the style. Final Draft is the number-one selling application specifically designed for writing movie scripts, television episodics, and stage plays. It combines powerful word processing with professional script formatting in one self-contained, easy-to-use package. There is no need to learn about script formatting rules - Final Draft automatically paginates and formats your script to industry standards as you write.
What's New
Version 9.0.3:
  • Page colors now match their Revision ID.
  • Scripts with few or no Scene Headings are now responsive.
  • Drawing in text, status bar, toolbar, scroll slider and others drawing as expected with no issues.
  • Text no longer disappears when the Undo command is issued after pasting large amounts of text.
  • Script and Character reports can now be generated quicker.
  • Highlighting is now confined to the selected paragraph(s), no spillover.
  • The revision page color is now displayed immediately if text is deleted.
  • Dragging selected text to the grey area no longer impacts pagination and elements.
  • The entire context menu is now visible no matter where the cursor is.
  • All changes made to Summary Cards are now saved when the view is changed.
  • Scene Numbers in the Status Bar now update when the script is scrolled.
  • The URL for the automatic update check has been corrected.
  • All characters now retain their Arc beat after a scene is omitted.
  • Replace Character now changes Non-Speaking characters too.
  • Undo Dual Dialogue works as expected.
  • The cursor now correctly remains static when typing or changing insertion points.
  • Exporting a script to FDR now displays only one progress bar.
  • Pasting a selection no longer adds a blank space or blank element to the end of that pasted selection based upon on how the text was selected (left to right or right to left).
  • The General Note menu item is now available in the Index Card views and Scene View.
  • The Add ScriptNote button in the Navigator is now disabled in Index Cards and Scene Views.
  • The Remove ScriptNote button in the Navigator is now disabled if the script has no ScriptNotes.
  • A script can now be numbered / renumbered with a custom number.
  • Default colors (white background and black text) or revision page colors are output even if the Page Layout colors have been changed.
  • Statistics Reports now include page number and scene information about non-speaking characters.
  • The Status Bar now displays "Page X of Y" (i.e., "Page 5 of 10") in text documents.
  • Files now open at their last saved screen position.
  • Clearing revisions now clears both asterisks and revision page colors for all pages (A pages too).
  • Cursor vs. Mouse Arrow -- when a selection of text is clicked on the cursor now correctly turns into a mouse arrow and when it's released it goes back to a cursor.
  • Character and Dialogue no longer remain highlighted when you change the Character name.
  • Deleting a hyperlink in a ScriptNote no longer turns other text into a weblink.
  • A hyperlink in a ScriptNote can now be selected without opening the web page.
Version 9.0.3:
  • Page colors now match their Revision ID.
  • Scripts with few or no Scene Headings are now responsive.
  • Drawing in text, status bar, toolbar, scroll slider and others drawing as expected with no issues.
  • Text no longer disappears when the Undo command is issued after pasting large amounts of text.
  • Script and Character reports can now be generated more...
Requirements
Intel, OS X 10.7 or later



MacUpdate - Final Draft







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    +7

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    +6

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    +4

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    +4

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    +1

  • MovieWriterPro
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Final Draft User Discussion (Write a Review)
ver. 9.x:
(2)
Your rating: Now say why...
Overall:
(18)

sort: smiles | time
burypromote

-1

Oasis reviewed on 07 Apr 2014
WHAT? Is this a joke?
[Version 9.0.3]

1 Reply

burypromote

+112
Lord-Lightning replied on 07 Apr 2014
As my dear old Irish great great great grandfather said about Final Draft - which he used to help Shakespeare format a stage play, "Oh Dear, Oh Dear, Oh Dear! Are they still flogging that?"
burypromote
+2

-29

UniqueNickName reviewed on 10 Jan 2014
't was the year 2014. the so called industry standard was still crawling with unicode bugs from the late 80's making use of final draft in languages other than the dictionaries provided for - impossible. was it laziness of people making 200$ off a license for a piece of software that gets 1-2 new lines of code in 5 years? was it an ill joke? or was it a conspiracy to preserve the financial leadership of the Hollywood industry?

who knows? perhaps in the year 2114 we will know the answer… but most likely we will not.
[Version 9.0.2]

1 Reply

burypromote
+1

+99
D-J replied on 14 Jan 2014
Definitely FD are thinking they can still leverage past legacy.

They're not paying attention to the market, user expectations, and competition. They may lasso aspirational newbies who think FD is essential, but I suspect FD's conversion for paid upgrades to the latest version will be much less than they expect.
burypromote
+5

+99
D-J commented on 07 Jan 2014
When I got the announcement email from Final Draft a few months ago and saw the upgrade price, I knew they were still thinking to sell at $250. So I wrote an email suggesting that this isn't 2004 anymore and there are many solidly viable alternatives, from Fade In and the like to Fountain markdown, and that they may want to rethink their pricing strategy.

The arrogant reply was breathtaking. Essentially, we are still industry leader and Hollywood depends upon us and our format is the industry default. So our price reflects this. It's like FD's marketing minds live in a bubble. Like many in Hollywood.

If you're not familiar with Fountain markdown:

http://fountain.io/
[Version 9.0]

9 Replies

burypromote

+90
Forn replied on 07 Jan 2014
I totally agree. There are a lot of alternatives. You can generate "industry defaults" even with proper formated word templates.
burypromote
+1

+112
Lord-Lightning replied on 07 Jan 2014
Foutain has already passed FD on several fronts and I know the developer has some very ground-breaking features in store that Final Draft 9 can only reach for and never achieve. You are dead right. Stick with Fountain and be delighted.
burypromote
+1

+112
Lord-Lightning replied on 07 Jan 2014
Oh, I did mean to say, I think the best Foutain implementation is Fade In. I now use it confidenty and just don't need FD anymore. Learning curve is about one to four hours to achieve a high level of mastery - depending on the complexity of text to bring to it.
burypromote

+97
Dmu replied on 09 Jan 2014
Unfortunately, the fatal flaw with Fountain/Fade In/Highland for me is that they are screenplay only. If any of them had a stageplay option, I would be able to bail from Final Draft completely. Unfortunately, FD is the only one with templates for playwrights.
burypromote
+1

+112
Lord-Lightning replied on 09 Jan 2014
You are familiar with Scrivener? Look it up on literatureandlatte.com
burypromote
+1

+112
Lord-Lightning replied on 09 Jan 2014
Scrivener has templates for both UK and US stage plays. You fire up any of the many templates when you open a new document - that's it. Then you write in that format until you need a new one. It makes adapting a screenplay or a stage play to other forms of fiction a hell of a lot easier than copying text from one app to another. If there is a book you want to mine or adapt as a screenplay ot stageplay then you do the reverse after you have copied the work from a text file into Scrivener.
burypromote
+2

+347
Lev replied on 10 Jan 2014
Highland has Screenplay, Stageplay and Manuscript formats. FadeIn Pro has a built-in Stage Play template (not to mention two-column A/V, radio script etc) and you can design anything you like. Fountain isn't a formatter but a markdown syntax, though it knows about e.g. Lyric elements (A line type in upper case and preceded by a tilde = a lyric line).

Scrivener can do any format you like (though its script formatting methodology could be changed to be Fountain-aware and everyone would be VERY happy).

Gosh, Movie Magic Screenwriter has stage play templates.

And of course nobody in the theatre has hissy fits because someone submits something with the wrong margins. All we need is a bit on the right where people do stuff, a bit in the middle where people's names go, a bit in parentheses where they give somebody a nasty look, and a bit all the way across where they say things.

So I don't think Final Draft has any lock on the playwright's craft, really.
burypromote

+112
Lord-Lightning replied on 10 Jan 2014
Lev says it all. Excellent. This reply deserves bookmarking.
burypromote

+99
D-J replied on 14 Jan 2014
@Dmu: As Lev pointed out, Highland has screenplay, stageplay, and manuscript modes. John August, one of the people behind both Fountain and Highland, writes for both screen and stage.

I don't use FadeIn anymore, but it allows you to format a new file as a screenplay, stage play, or TV format.
burypromote
+1

+97
Dmu commented on 06 Jan 2014
I absolutely do enjoy writing my scripts with Final Draft. It gets out of my way and lets me move quicker. It's stable, slim, good stuff. Expensive, yes… but I don't regret the expense I've made and the past upgrades. HOWEVER, I honestly don't see any compelling reason to upgrade to version 9.

It truly seems like a lazy attempt to grind some more cash out of existing customers. Like someone in a board room said "New customers are nearly non-existent without a desktop product launch in 5 years. We need a new version!"… But that takes time to make sir and we haven't even started, Boss! "Then make it an UPDATE but call it version NINE and treat it like an UPGRADE!"… Genius! $$$.

The website doesn't even have a highlighted "What's New!" section. Just a rehash of old features that have been streamlined or touched-up. It all smacks of Quark, pre-Indesign days. Greed and sloth from a near-monopoly.
[Version 9.0]

2 Replies

burypromote

+88
Frank-O'Connor replied on 06 Jan 2014
Mmmm ... I felt that way at Version 6, and have gone on to check out a number of other contenders since then.
burypromote

+99
D-J replied on 07 Jan 2014
I'd agree overall about FD for workflow, but I've been shifting to fountain markdown this past year, with Highland and Slugline, and I'm not looking back. Writing is enjoyable with fountain markdown, I can use any text editor, and both Highland and Slugline will convert to .fdx files if I need them.

The other thing about FD is that they are living in old-school thinking. Charging US$250 for software is not a model that can contiunue. Even Microsoft and Adobe have realised this strategy is not viable and had to resort to subscription to make it all seem cheaper.

There are an increasing number of alternatives to Final Draft, like Fade In, and certainly fountain markdown has rewritten how screenwriters can simplify workflow and write more productively. Final Draft still seems to think it is the only relevant game in town, but increasingly it is being sidelined.
burypromote
+2

+4

J-Khulasphoc reviewed on 24 Oct 2011
It's probably the most solid & simple screenwriting-only software. But it's also extremely overpriced for what it does. Final draft should learn a thing or two about other programs such as Scrivener (not just for screenwriters), specially in terms of organising the creative process any writer as to go through. Update policies & pricing should be revised as - again - it's expensive and does not offer enough new features to justify the price from one version to the next. Still, my favourite screen writing program - loyalty and lazy I guess...
[Version 8.0.3]

1 Reply

burypromote
+2

+112
Lord-Lightning replied on 04 Apr 2013
Fade In from The General Coffee House Film Company does twice the heavy lifting that either Final Draft or ScreenWriter Pro can do for less than a quarter of the price ($50 if you are quick). It is prettier and more responsive and based on the "the Open Screenplay Format: a straightforward, application-agnostic XML-based file format for saving your scripts, providing maximum accessibility, compatibility, and future-proofing. " Far superior to the pricey heavyweights in every way.
http://www.fadeinpro.com/
burypromote
+1

+7

Babyfett reviewed on 22 Dec 2009
I've been using Final Draft since version 1 or 2 and have always found the actual screenwriting aspect of the program great and easy to use. FD6 was much better than 7. 7 was very buggy until the end and its text was very unclear and there were artifacts virtually every time I scrolled down. FD8 is far less buggy and the text is now crystal clear. Though there are a few school down artifacts, but I'm used to that by now and I've found them to exist in other screenwriting programs. One of the best Mac improvements is that the menu bar is now back attached to the script document. It floated in 7 and I'd lose the top of my document underneath it. But that's all fixed now.

I'm a meticulous outliner and used to outline everything in Word. I've never been into the index card thing. But moving scenes is a bit of a pain in Word so I started to use Scrivener to outline my scripts. Much better, but not perfect. The text in outline mode is a little small, but I loved the notes features and the importing of html snippets and pictures and whatnot, but I didn't enjoy writing screenplays on it and to have to switch between Scrivener and Final Draft while writing was a bit of a pain so I'd ultimately end up just exporting it back to Word. Well now Final Draft claims to have built an ideal outlining program into their program. They claim they took note of other programs like Scrivener and Save the Cat and others. Playing around with the demo I was excited, but when I upgraded for $80 I was very disappointed. I "imported" the outline I was already working on and by imported I mean I cut and pasted each individual story beat and then continued using FD8. Not an easy taste. In the outliner/scene view you cannot enter your summary, you have to switch to index card view. So I figured I would write just fill out the outline in index card view, but alas you cannot enter scene titles in index card view so I figured I would try using just the summary cards, but there you cannot enter the scene headings! This was crazy to me. You need to be able to do all three in each view.

So I finally got my outline entered into Final Draft 8 and as I start writing my information in my outline changes as I go. This was also crazy to me. I need a locked outline so I can go back and refer to it, but when I contacted Final Draft they said there was no way to unlink the two. This is counter productive to me. But the program is designed so that whatever you write in your outlining phase is accurately reflected in the script. Personally I need to separate things to write a good script. If my outline changes it's no longer an outline, it's merely an extension of the script and not an outline. There's an option not to have your summaries show up on the script view, but you still see all your scene headings on the page view and this is very very distracting. I want a blank page when I write. Not 8 pages of scene headings to look at and intimidate me.

Bottom line, if Final Draft can unlock the outline from the script I think this would be a great product again, but right now the big improvements they are touting aren't quite ready for primetime yet. So until it's changed it's back to Scrivener and Word for me. Though I might try Storyist which looks like it has lots of promise for what I'm currently looking for.
[Version 8.0.1]


burypromote
+2

+347
lev commented on 17 Sep 2009
FD8 isn't so bad. It does its stuff and it's easier to set up new script elements than Screenwriter. ( I'm working on a musical at the moment, which needs a LYRIC element. In FD it's a snap. In Screenwriter you have to set up an "outline element" which isn't quite so well-behaved, though it does work.)

BUT... beware. The activation system will dump you like a shot if e.g. you have a system crash and reinstall, or (as I did) you upgrade to Snow Leopard then have to roll back because SnoLe isn't really ready to print with your new HP printer (tsk). The assumption is that all users are (a) in the ConUS, (b) have an internet connection and (c) aren't doing anything particular much that day in the way of work so can wait for a support dude to reset the damn registration database.. They can do what they like, but it's annoying for the user who, as I am, is on a little Greek island trying to get some work done in peace. Thankfully I'm only using FD to read/revise someone else's work. Screenwriter is a bit more elegant in its approach. Not much; but they've at least automated the process so you don't have to make two trips into town to get the software you've paid for working again.

I don't actually understand the reasoning, really. If you're a pro, you're going to buy the software because you need it. If you're not a pro, I can't see anyone popping $250 for a highly-specialised app, although they will certainly bootleg it to sit in their rooms pretending they're Bill Goldman. But I presume they have their reasons.

Oh, one heads-up. Lord Lightning mentioned integration with Scrivener. Which is wonderful if you're using standard screenplay format. On the current job, I'm not, and Scrivener (which is marvellous) and FD don't really understand what each other are doing. That pesky LYRIC element causes mutual incomprehension. I expect the brilliant Keith Blount will fix it in Scrivener but for the moment it's no go.
[Version 8.0]


burypromote
+3

-3

shadow ray reviewed on 06 May 2009
This is an ok screenwriting program, but this version has about 3 new features versus FD7, which was released five years ago. I have 7 and I was all ready to upgrade but after trying it decided not to. Obviously they're not putting much money into developing the program and expect screenwriters and productions to just deal with using archaic production tools.

I'm sure Final Draft 9 will have another 3-4 features that every other screenwriting program's had for years when it's released in 2014 or 2015 but I'd rather not wait.

Screenwriter 6 has a few bugs but is very sophisticated and miles ahead of this in pretty much every way. I'm buying that instead and will be encouraging my co-workers to do the same. It's not listed on this site for some reason but check it out, there's a free demo for it.
[Version 8.0]

1 Reply

burypromote
+2

+33
frail47 replied on 08 May 2009
I agree, Movie Magic Screenwriter 6 is better than Final Draft 8. The only thing I like about FD 8 vs. MMSW 6 is the more "Mac-like: GUI, but it's not as intuitive and user friendly.
burypromote
+3

+112
Lord-Lightning commented on 30 Apr 2009
If this was not supported by the AWG (and what the heck does that mean?), I would not use it at all. CeltX is free. Montage is becoming more and more refined and is slated to merge with Contour; the old draughthorse, Screenwriter Pro, still beats it for sheer reliability and heavy lifting. Oh! You say it integrates with Scrivener and Screenwriter Pro has an apoplectic fit when it tries to? Dang! That means I have to take it seriously all over again. Oh well.
[Version 8.0]

1 Reply

burypromote

+5
Thunderclap82 replied on 01 May 2009
Where have you seen that Contour and Montage are merging? I'd be very interested in this product!
burypromote
+7

+269

gryphonent reviewed on 30 Apr 2009
Purchased Final Draft 4, 5, 6, and 7... all buggy as hell with no support at all after purchase. Bugs remain unfixed and the developer does just not care for customers on the Mac platform. I will not pay another $80 to this company. Proposed colored index cards in version 4 years ago, now they implemented the idea. Have migrated to Montage and Scrivener... better companies, better support, better product!
[Version 8.0]

1 Reply

burypromote
+2

+33
Bluestar replied on 30 Apr 2009
Yeah, Agreed. Overpriced crappy little software...
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JamesBond9408 rated on 13 Mar 2013

[Version 8.0.3]



aunda rated on 08 Aug 2012

[Version 8.0.3]


Downloads:41,800
Version Downloads:196
Type:Business : Word Processing
License:Demo
Date:07 Apr 2014
Platform:Intel 32 / OS X
Price: $249.99
Overall (Version 9.x):
Features:
Ease of Use:
Value:
Stability:
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Final Draft allows you to use your creative energy to focus on the content; let Final Draft take care of the style. Final Draft is the number-one selling application specifically designed for writing movie scripts, television episodics, and stage plays. It combines powerful word processing with professional script formatting in one self-contained, easy-to-use package. There is no need to learn about script formatting rules - Final Draft automatically paginates and formats your script to industry standards as you write.


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