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Chinese Strokes Order free download for Mac

Chinese Strokes Order Reviews

1.6.0
18 July 2019

Improve the drawing of your pictograms.

patgdut
09 February 2016

Most helpful

Awesome app! It is the app I have been looking for!
Like (1)
Version 1.0

Read 4 Chinese Strokes Order User Reviews

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Funjoy
05 August 2017
My immediate thought was that this is begging to be an iOS app. Then I clicked over to the developer and saw that it is. That's the app I'd buy if I needed to practice my characters!
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Version 1.3.2
hwgray
16 February 2016
The use of _drawing_ instead of _writing_ would have annoyed the hell out of my professor, Yoshiko Dijkstra-sensei. (Her husband was a Friesian-American.)
Like (1)
Version 1.0.2
2 answer(s)
Bousozoku
Bousozoku
18 February 2016
I'm sure your instructor would have mentioned the importance of stroke order. It's certainly important in China and Japan.
Like (1)
hwgray
hwgray
24 April 2018
She wasn't an "instructor." Rather, she was a professor of Japanese at UCLA. However, WRT the importance of stroke-order, I've never had a teacher or read a book that didn't underline the importance of stroke-order. But it was also important to Dijkstra-sensei that students should recognize that kanji is _writing_ and is not "drawing."
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patgdut
09 February 2016
Awesome app! It is the app I have been looking for!
Like (1)
Version 1.0
Macintosh-Sauce
08 February 2016
Shouldn't this be named, Mandarin Strokes Order? There is no such thing as the "Chinese" language. It's either Mandarin, Cantonese, etc.
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Version 1.0
4 answer(s)
karenherring
karenherring
08 February 2016
Nope. The Chinese characters that you see above are pictograms. That is, they are pictorial representations of actual things (a person, the sun, a horse). The pictograms (which we will now call 'words') are written the same but pronounced differently depending on whether you speak Cantonese or Mandarin. Thus film director John Woo has one written name that can be read by all Chinese speakers. But if you are Cantonese, you'd call him Ng Yu Sum and if you are Mandarin, his name is Wu Yu Seng. Same visual, different pronunciation.
Like (5)
Macintosh-Sauce
Macintosh-Sauce
08 February 2016
@karenherring

Well, I learned something today. Thanks. :)
Like (1)
Bousozoku
Bousozoku
18 February 2016
Chinese writing is split into Simplified and Traditional.

林 can be lim, lin, lam (or in Japanese, hayashi and rin).
Like (1)
Daiyi
Daiyi
24 April 2018
Not all Chinese characters are pictograms. That is a myth. There are six categories of characters.

Stroke order is also the same regardless of the dialect or pronunciation of the character.
Like (1)