Apple Java
Apple Java
2017-001

3.0

Apple Java free download for Mac

Apple Java

2017-001
01 February 2019

For OS X 10.7 through macOS 10.13.

Overview

Java for macOS 2017-001 installs the legacy Java 6 runtime for macOS 10.13 High Sierra, macOS 10.12 Sierra, macOS 10.11 El Capitan, macOS 10.10 Yosemite, macOS 10.9 Mavericks, macOS 10.8 Mountain Lion, and macOS 10.7 Lion.

This package is exclusively intended for support of legacy software and installs the same deprecated version of Java 6 included in the 2015-001, 2014-001, and 2013-005 releases.

Quit any Java applications before installing this update.

See https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT202912 for more details about this update.

See https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201222 for information about the security content of this update.

Keep your software up to date. If you need Java, download the latest version of Java for OS X directly from Oracle https://www.java.com

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62 Apple Java Reviews

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Rate this app:

Mysticalos
20 July 2011

Most helpful

This is also downloaded automaticlaly on first run if you just open java prepferences in the utilities folder, it's basically install on demand software and will install itself once you try to use it. Stand alone is convinient for mass distribution though.
Like (7)
Version 1.0
Jer
31 January 2019
Did I fall into a time portal? Why is the 2017 update showing up dated January 31, 2019?
Like
Version 2017-001
3 answer(s)
Scion777
Scion777
31 January 2019
Has an updated description that it will run the legacy Java apps on Sierra, High Sierra and Mojave - so that is Apple's "update."
Like (1)
Aapple
Aapple
31 January 2019
Yes, this one is bitwise identical to the one I downloaded last February (2018)
Like
rardin
rardin
01 February 2019
Agree with Aapple that the current image matches the one I downloaded months ago. So the question is, does it apply to Mojave? I was convinced that it did yesterday, but must have imagined that I saw "macOS Mojave 10.14" on Apple's download page. There is no mention of Mojave there this morning, nor in the MacUpdate entry. So the question may remain about why the MacUpdate entry was updated yesterday.
Like
echix
04 November 2017
Sorrry, but I can`t find no update to Apple Java 2017-001.
Like
Version 2017-001
MichaelHaeusler
22 September 2017
It's working great on El Capitan, but does this still work on Sierra and High Sierra? I have a single application that still needs Apple's legacy Java Runtime 6.
Like (1)
Version 2015-001
1 answer(s)
Semplicita
Semplicita
15 February 2018
Yes, it is the same: https://support.apple.com/kb/DL1572?locale=en_US
Like
GeogProf
28 July 2015
There appears to be nothing at all new in this release. What the hell is this for?
Like
Version 2015-001
1 answer(s)
Xenedar
Xenedar
28 July 2015
The words "OS X 10.11 El Capitan" are not "nothing at all new".
This update is obviously to let it install on 10.11.
https://support.apple.com/kb/DL1572
Like it or not, a local Java install (as opposed to Oracle's browser plug-in) are still important to some people and/or apps.
Like (5)
Derekcurrie
27 July 2015
A quick and simple way to DISABLE running JAVA over the Internet (if you have Admin privileges):

1) Go to /Library/Internet Plug-Ins/
2) Remove from this directory everything listed as 'Java'. Yes, that includes Apple's own alias file "JavaAppletPlugin.plugin". I advise that you store these files somewhere, just in case you want to use them later for some odd purpose. I have them in a folder labeled "Internet Plug-ins (disabled)" inside the Library folder.
3) QUIT and restart all your web browsers. Java now cannot run in them over the Internet, which is where Java is particularly dangerous.

There are other Java bits and pieces you could trash. But for the sake of simplicity and the ability to reinstate the Java Plug-In whenever you may want to actually use it on the Internet, I'd leave everything else in place.

NOTE: Running Java applications off the Internet is not typically a problem. Just be sure you run Java apps, off the Internet, from reliable developers. Trojan horse Java applications are possible. So avoid running mysterious Java apps you know nothing about. Check up on their reputation and verify they are NOT Trojans.

Why is Java over the Internet now so dangerous? Thank Oracle, who obtained Java when they bought Sun Microsystems. Oracle specifically BROKE the Java sandbox, allowing Java to interact directly with computer systems. This was the stupidest thing Oracle could do with Java.
Like (4)
Version 2015-001
5 answer(s)
Kihoalu
Kihoalu
27 July 2015
Gee thanks, Oracle.

There a few scant reasons to use Java: older versions of Photoshop used it to phone home, I believe. Also some windows-ported, overpriced flowchart apps.
Like
Derekcurrie
Derekcurrie
27 July 2015
There are some reasonable applications that run on Java. None of them require the nasty Oracle Java Internet Plug-in. If you need to install a newer version of Apple's controlled version of Java, OS X will let you know. Apple has been very careful in the past year to protect users from the awful Oracle Java plug-in.

Some OK apps that use Java, NOT over the Internet:
- ImageJ
- ArtOfIllusion
- JEdit
Like (1)
Kobalt
Kobalt
27 July 2015
@ Derekcurrie

Thanks for the advice.

As "JavaAppletPlugin.plugin" is, as you say, only an alias, should we also delete the original which is embedded in /System/Library/Java/Support/CoreDeploy.bundle?
Like
Derekcurrie
Derekcurrie
27 July 2015
Kobalt asked: "As "JavaAppletPlugin.plugin" is, as you say, only an alias, should we also delete the original which is embedded in /System/Library/Java/Support/CoreDeploy.bundle?"

No, don't bother.

As I stated above, as long as there is no access to a Java plug-in within the Internet Plug-Ins folder, you're fine. Java is dead over the Internet. You're done.

Also, as above, you may someday want to put back that alias in order to run Java on the Internet for some fiddly thing or other. For example, sometimes there are fun games on the net that are in Java. As long as you verify that the Java applet you're going to run over the net is legitimate (versus being some phishing or Trojan horse scam), you're probably fine. So hang onto the alias. Just don't keep it in the Internet Plug-Ins folder.

Note that there is also an Internet Plug-Ins folder inside the user account Library folder, as in:
~/Library/Internet Plug-Ins/
But Java isn't installed there. Oracle and Apple put it in the root Library folder instead.
Like (1)
Xenedar
Xenedar
28 July 2015
Java on the internet has nothing to do with Apple's local Java VM (i.e.: this installer). Indeed this installer removes Apple's old plug-in.
Talking about the need to disable Java plug-ins on here is misleading - it belongs on the Oracle Java page.
This installer is to support locally installed apps that use Java resources, in the same way an app might use Tcl, Ruby or X11. It goes nowhere near any browser.
Like (1)
Kihoalu
27 July 2015
There is way too much lame software still running Java online.
I’ve seen job employment service companies (re-trainers) who still rely on it!

Should not leave any good feelings about how they (retrainers) handle other sensitive data, if they can’t get this right!

An under-explained update.
If there was a version later than 6 installed - what GETS installed with this Apple installer?

Does it REALLY overwrite newer versions of Java?

Does it remove any System Pref Panes, or does it roll the references back to Apple Java 6?

What it comes down to, is that most people know very little about what their computers are doing. If the Preference Pane feedback is faulty, the user can be persuaded that something did, or did not get updated!
Like
Version 2015-001
HelenaG8531
11 June 2014
What about iPhone and iPad iOS? Are there Java plug-ins there needing to be disabled? Meanwhile, thanks Rick for your earlier answer! Wish I could reply to your reply to say it there!
Like
Version 2014-001
1 answer(s)
Mikael-B
Mikael-B
30 July 2014
Simple: No java on IOS.
Like
HelenaG8531
11 June 2014
I hope you guys can clear this up for me and those I've guided to follow today's NPR news advice to disable Java in all browsers. I did and then found that browsing now isn't working well for most of my visited sites, including FaceBook which plastered a banner across the top explaining that it depending on Java script. So the below comment also confuses me: "Therefore, I and many others (including Derekcurrie at the top of this thread) strongly recommend removing Java if you don’t need it. (And most people don’t need it. According to stats, only 0.1% of websites use Java)." What are we supposed to do: disable Java in our browsers or not?? Thank you so much for clarifying this!
Like
Version 2014-001
1 answer(s)
anonymous-reindeer-1972
anonymous-reindeer-1972
16 July 2014
Java and JavaScript are two different things. Most of the web uses JavaScript to load content. Java in the browser should only be selectively enabled for sites that absolutely need it; otherwise, it's a big security concern. I still block JavaSctipt in Firefox by default with NoScript but then enable the content on webpages I trust, but that's me. To clarify: Java=security risk, JavaScript=OK.
Like (1)
Derekcurrie
09 June 2014
This Java update from Apple is a bit of a mystery. But if you have OS X 10.7 - 10.9, I'd run the installer. I'd also keep it around in case you want to UN-install Oracle's dangerous Java 7 Internet Plug-in. This installer works the same as the Java 2013-005 Installer. It UN-installs the dangerous Oracle Java 7 Internet Plug-in and provides the most updated version of Java 6 specific to running Java inside OS X (not Internet Java). As far as I or other researchers can determine, Apple never pushed out this version of their Java update to anyone on any version of OS X. Exactly what it is for is a mystery. To this day, there is still NO security document for this update. Apple never emailed out a security announcement about it either. I suspect this is just another example of blundering by Apple's documentation team, which has now become an expectation, they're that poorly organized.
Like (6)
Version 2014-001
13 answer(s)
-rick-v-
-rick-v-
09 June 2014
Hey Derek, I believe the uninstaller will only uninstall/remove the Java 7 plugin *if* it is not the latest version. If it is the latest, then it leaves it in place.
Like
Canadianpj
Canadianpj
10 June 2014
How is the java 7 plugin dangerous if you have it updated?
Like
-rick-v-
-rick-v-
10 June 2014
Canadianpj, The problem with Java is that it’s always an uphill battle in patching bugs and exploits. They patch some today, but there will be more tomorrow. Fundamentally, the issue is that Java is a full-fledged programming language wrapped into a plugin. Yes, they try to wrap everything in sandboxes and other restrictions. But as we’ve seen from past performance, we can guess future returns. The ‘returns’ being more bugs leading to more exploits. Therefore, I and many others (including Derekcurrie at the top of this thread) strongly recommend removing Java if you don’t need it. (And most people don’t need it. According to stats, only 0.1% of websites use Java). But if you do need Java (typically for internal corporate sites), be very very careful. And keep it updated.
Like (2)
Canadianpj
Canadianpj
10 June 2014
There are applications which require it as well. I know Crashplan did, I'm not sure if that is the case anymore. But, yes, this is not the plugin. Java itself gets a bad name for the problems regarding the plugin.
Like
-rick-v-
-rick-v-
10 June 2014
Yes, Java gets a bad name due mainly because of the plugin. However, installing Java installs the plugin. You don't get a choice. And Java's track record for exploits speaks for itself, the reputation is deserved. So, if you want to use a program (such as CrashPlan) and install Java to use it, you've just made your computer more vulnerable. Ideally, programs like CrashPlan would bundle the Java runtime into the app itself. Then you avoid having to install Java separately, which avoids the plugin mess. Many other apps on both Mac and Windows have done this already (just one example is CyberDuck, starting with version 4.4).
Like (1)
Canadianpj
Canadianpj
10 June 2014
This does not take into account its extremely easy to disable the plugin in the browser and leave Java available for applications. In that light I do not believe it's a threat. Regardless, yes, you should not really have any major plugin running that you are not using but we should give all the facts. Which again, you do not need the plugin active to have Java.
Like
-rick-v-
-rick-v-
10 June 2014
Yes, if you absolutely need Java, you can always disable the plugin within the browser. For users that absolutely require Java, I do exactly that. However, two problems with that: 1. Vast majority of normal users (either Mac or Windows) don't do this precautionary step (disable unneeded plugins), period. 2. Even if they do (or more realistically; I do it for them), plugins have a funny way of getting re-enabled. I've seen it countless times. A Java auto-update or a new browser version, and next thing you know they're back in play. So as best practice, I tell people they shouldn't have Java installed at all.
Like
Volcanus
Volcanus
10 June 2014
One should better install the Oracle JDK 7 or 8. The Oracle JRE is not sufficient to run Java programs on OS X. It only installs the Java plugin for browsers. The Apple Java update does not remove Oracle JRE 7 or 8. Apple Java can't be removed. There is no uninstaller.
Like
RavenNevermore
RavenNevermore
10 June 2014
Well it states: "This update uninstalls the Apple-provided Java applet plug-in from all Web browsers." And then when you get a plugin missing error they want you to download it from Oracle. So it's uninstalling the *Apple* plugin, not the Oracle plugin, since they are telling you to get it from them if you get a missing plugin error. Personally I leave Java disabled in the browser, with the exception of one website, PayPal, that needs it to print international shipping labels, via Pitney Bowes. Why Pitney Bowes uses Java is beyond me. And they only use it for the international labels, not the domestic ones.
Like
Derekcurrie
Derekcurrie
11 June 2014
RavenNevermore replied: "Well it states: "This update uninstalls the Apple-provided Java applet plug-in from all Web browsers." Thank you! My blunder. (O_0) Excellent thread! Thanks all.
Like
HelenaG8531
HelenaG8531
11 June 2014
I hope you guys can clear this up for me and those I've guided to follow today's NPR news advice to disable Java in all browsers. I did and then found that browsing now isn't working well for most of my visited sites, including FaceBook which plastered a banner across the top explaining that it depending on Java script. So the below comment also confuses me: "Therefore, I and many others (including Derekcurrie at the top of this thread) strongly recommend removing Java if you don’t need it. (And most people don’t need it. According to stats, only 0.1% of websites use Java)." What are we supposed to do: disable Java in our browsers or not?? Thank you so much for clarifying this!
Like
-rick-v-
-rick-v-
11 June 2014
HelenaG8531, I've just made a very common mistake. :-) When reading threads like this one, many users confuse Java and JavaScript. They are two completely separate things. Back in the earliest days of the Internet, when it was assumed that Java was going to be the big hot thing, the creators of JavaScript wanted to ride the coat tails of Java's name. This thread is referring only to the Java plugin. You can safely re-enable JavaScript in your browser and the web will magically start working again. :-)
Like (1)
Kihoalu
Kihoalu
27 July 2015
IF this legacy fix does not remove potentially flawed Java versions -

It seems to me, one needs to UNinstall current versions Java -- first.
This really begs the question: HOW TO UNINSTALL JAVA?

Its nice to see that Apple bumped the rev to 2015 to be clear.
However, far too vague about “needing” Java.
Like
Volcanus
31 May 2014
This Java is totally outdated. It can't be removed after installation. One can no longer choose which java version to use. This is crap. Java on OS X is totally flawed.
Like (1)
Version 2013-005
1 answer(s)
Derekcurrie
Derekcurrie
09 June 2014
Apple is supplying Java specific to running applets within OS X, NOT web applets. Apple's installer actually removes the Java Internet Plug-in then has Safari ask the user if they want to install Java IF they at some point run into a Java applet on the Internet. Apple then points the user to the Oracle Java Plug-in installer on the net. So there is no problem here. Java works on OS X. The dangerous Java Internet Plug-in is not running by default, avoiding Java malware. You decide to install the plug-in if you need it. The current plug-in version is Java 7 (aka v1.7). Why all this contortion from Apple? It's because Oracle broke the Java sandbox, resulting in Java on the Internet being the single most DANGEROUS software a Mac user can run. Don't do Internet Java unless have to. IOW: Apple is insisting upon keeping its users as safe as possible. No is only Apple could do the same for Adobe's crap Flash and Shockwave Internet plug-ins, which are the #2 & #3 most DANGEROUS software on the Internet. I write about Mac security here: https://Mac-Security.blogspot.com
Like (6)