Rip
Rip
1.0b

4.3

Rip free download for Mac

Rip

1.0b
17 December 2009

Accurate CD audio extraction.

Overview

Rip is an application for accurate CD audio extraction.

5 Rip Reviews

Rate this app:

Tlance
18 December 2009

Most helpful

Snake oil. Validity of process is as much theory based as true replication. Yes there is Accurate Rip "verification" but beyond that users are left to accept on faith in the concept. For personal use as an archive tool it is straightforwardly easy, quick, and valid enough (though limited by extracting to lossless only). For use in a trading world it will never be accepted.
Like (2)
Version 1.0b
Echorob
27 February 2012
Yes Rest In Peace. This software seems dead.
Like
Version 1.0b
5 answer(s)
SMcCandlish
SMcCandlish
08 April 2013
In what way? The fact that you have a -350 feedback rating here does not inspire confidence in your review.
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Penguirl
Penguirl
21 April 2013
@Smccandish Neither does a +1…
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Roburt
Roburt
03 June 2013
This software is no longer being worked on. I assume thats whats was meant when they said dead.
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SMcCandlish
SMcCandlish
03 June 2013
@Penguiurl, I wasn't writing a review, I was asking a question, smartass.
Like (1)
Uncoy
Uncoy
07 February 2014
Guys this software works great and is the only ripper which will submit data easily to FreeDB (I always grab the Gracenote from iTunes and send it off to FreeDB as a public service).
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EndoLab
23 August 2011
Rest In Peace?
Like
Version 1.0b
3 answer(s)
RavenNevermore
RavenNevermore
11 December 2011
People started saying "RIP" when they were copying CDs, probably from when people RIP'd files for printing. In that case they were converting vector to raster files; RIP stands for "Raster Image Processing". There's no reason to use it for audio extraction, but it has become common, even if it has no direct meaning in this instance.
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EndoLab
EndoLab
12 December 2011
Thanks you for the info David. I thought it was about ripping something out (maybe there are several meaning). But talking about informatics it makes sense indeed.
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Echorob
Echorob
27 February 2012
Yes Rest In Peace. This software seems dead.
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Uncoy
06 March 2010
Rip is the only software for OS X that allows you to easily submit data to FreeDB and Musicbrainz. Others will only let you receive. iCDc will submit to FreeDB but it's tricky to make it do so with the iTunes data. More info at: http://foliovision.com/2010/03/02/freedb-cddb-musicbrainz-on-osx
Like
Version 1.0b
mpiekielnik
01 January 2010
Excellent cd-ripper! It is still in beta but works as advertised. Many features, with most important - AccurateRip checking. Pros: This is proper 'Exact Audio Copy' replacement for Mac. Cons: Lacks LAME MP3 encoding (yet?).
Like
Version 1.0b
4 answer(s)
RavenNevermore
RavenNevermore
11 December 2011
You can only be as accurate as the particular CD you are extracting audio from. CDs have errors, and also have built in error correction, but you can't replace bits that are missing. All the software that says it does 100% accurate copies is a bit of a misnomer.
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Aikousha
Aikousha
03 February 2013
@Davidravenmoon What paranoid fantasy are you working from? CDs and DVDs are VERY accurate, even though they have built-in error checking and correction, since errors eventually do occur. But you could never distribute software on optical disc if they weren't extremely accurate. One single wrong bit in the code (not necessarily data) will destroy a program. And Apple software (the big ones) do checksums before installation, on packages across DVDs that are up to 40 or more GBs... Error correction on music CDs is primarily to handle issues due to surface damage (scratches), and the normal response to failed checksums is to briefly drop the output. If you are referring to cumulative surface damage, then you have a point. But a good ripping software will let you know if ANY block of information is bad, and therefore, unless the programmer is an @$$, touting 100% accurate as far as content is concerned, is not a misnomer... unless you count reproducing surface damage as being part of the accuracy.
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RavenNevermore
RavenNevermore
04 February 2013
@Aikousha , no, it is you who are living in a fantasy world! CD players can fill in missing data up to an extent. All CDs have missing data of some sort to to physical anomalies in the metal. If the chunk of missing data is too large, you hear a pop or click. This is part of the Redbook audio CD spec. Audio CDs use all 2352 bytes per block for sound samples, while CD-ROMs use only 2048 bytes per block. Most of the rest is for ECC (Error Correcting Code) data. All of the data written to a CD uses CIRC (Cross-Interleaved Reed-Solomon Code) encoding. Every CD has two layers of error correction, called C1 and C2. C1 corrects bit errors at the lowest level, C2 applies to bytes in a frame (24 bytes per frame, 98 frames per sector). In addition, the data is interleaved and spread over a large arc. (This is why you should always clean CDs from the center out, not in a circular motion. A circular scratch causes multiple errors within a frame, while a radial scratch distributes the errors across multiple frames.) If there are too many errors, the CD player will interpolate samples to get a reasonable value. This way you don't get nasty clicks and pops in your music, even if the CD is dirty and the errors are uncorrectable. Interpolating adjacent data bytes on a CD-ROM wouldn't work very well, so the data is returned without the interpolation. The second level of ECC and EDC (Error Detection Codes) works to make sure your CD-ROM stays readable with even more errors. So, if there were zero errors in audio CDs, you would not need ECC. It's not just for scratched CDs. There are always very small manufacturing defects, but generally they do not cause problems. If you have been using Macs long enough, you will remember that Apple didn't do checksums. There was at least one instance where a batch of Apple OS CDs was not readable on everyone's Mac. That happened to me. AFter that they would verify the installer CD or DVD before installing. Once again, if there was never any defects, that would not be necessary.
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RavenNevermore
RavenNevermore
04 February 2013
Also, you wrote: "But a good ripping software will let you know if ANY block of information is bad, and therefore, unless the programmer is an @$$, touting 100% accurate as far as content is concerned, is not a misnomer" Now, read what I wrote: "You can only be as accurate as the particular CD you are extracting audio from. " Do you understand that sentence? If the CD has defects, the copy will have defects. So it will be a 100% accurate copy, but it will not be error free, IF the original has defects. And all CDs have some minimal defects. Got it? So saying "Exact Audio Copy" is misleading.
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Tlance
18 December 2009
Snake oil. Validity of process is as much theory based as true replication. Yes there is Accurate Rip "verification" but beyond that users are left to accept on faith in the concept. For personal use as an archive tool it is straightforwardly easy, quick, and valid enough (though limited by extracting to lossless only). For use in a trading world it will never be accepted.
Like (2)
Version 1.0b
Free

4.3

App requirements: 
  • Intel 32
  • PPC 32
  • Mac OS X 10.5.8 or later
Developer Website: 
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