BootPicker
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(3) 3.5

Startup OS chooser for your Intel Mac.   Free
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BootPicker ... With the advent of Boot Camp comes the possibility of deploying multi-boot Macs and permitting your end users to choose whichever platform will work best for whatever they'd like to do at the moment. But how do you manage the presentation of this choice? There are a couple concerns to keep in mind:
  • Setting the boot device is an activity restricted to administrative users.
  • Allowing non-administrative users access to this functionality potentially allows them to set the boot device to some external media that they provide (then they can really tamper with
What's New
Version 2.2:
  • Resolved inconsistent accessibility behavior.
  • Updated the helper tool that records BootPicker preferences in the BootPicker Preference Pane. This tool is no longer a setuid binary.
  • Updated for Snow Leopard compatibility.
Requirements
Intel, Mac OS X 10.5 or later



MacUpdate - BootPicker




  • rEFIt
    +4

  • BootChamp
    +3

  • QuickBoot
    +1

  • Flipside
    +1
BootPicker User Discussion (Write a Review)
ver. 2.x:
(3)
Your rating: Now say why...
Overall:
(4)

sort: smiles | time
burypromote

-3

Bug reviewed on 29 Oct 2012
This does what it says: let's you very conveniently pick your OS at startup (especially when like me you always forget to keep the option key pressed)
[Version 2.2]


burypromote

+605
Fishscale commented on 29 Aug 2012
Why does this software list apple as the developer? I believe this is a 3rd party app by Mike Bombich, creator of carbon copy cloner (great software). Is there something I am missing or should this be updated MU admins? Thanks.
[Version 2.2]

2 Replies

burypromote

+263
MacUpdate---Ryan replied on 29 Aug 2012
Thanks for pointing that out Fishscale, I've updated the listing.
burypromote
+1

+2
tibbar replied on 29 Aug 2012
Apple hosted the software for awhile on their educational institution IT pages, but I guess they decided not to anymore.
burypromote
-3

-1

Lance_baker reviewed on 30 Aug 2010
Option, option, option... STOP telling us about holding the option key. We Mac users expect a more elegant way to choose the startup. Sitting attached to the keyboard holding the option for 20 seconds at every restart (yes, sometimes we forget what the boot is set for, so we better sit at the keyboard and hold... and hold) is not the best solution.

Unfortunately, BootPicker is no better. This is the most useless piece of software I have ever seen. It does not change the actual ROM setting for startup. It always boots to OS X first, and presents a picker screen just before user login should appear. Even when I am in Windows, and use BootCamp control panel to choose to boot to OS X, this thing STILL halts the startup of OS X and presents its cotton picking picker screen. That is no better than holding the option key.

For those of us needing OS X to have write support for a Windows 7 partition, NTFS-3G needs to add a System Preferences pane like that of "NTFS For Mac" that allows you to choose the writable NTFS partition with Windows 7 as the startup. Until that happens, NTFS For Mac is the best method of having NTFS write support AND a fairly elegant way to set the startup disk.
[Version 2.1.2]


burypromote

-2
LMP commented on 12 Apr 2009
If the links don't work, you can download Bootpicker from this URL: http://www.apple.com/education/it-professionals/bootpicker/
[Version 2.1.2]


burypromote

+21
Likos commented on 20 Jan 2009
Links are dead.
[Version 2.1.2]

2 Replies

burypromote

+124
Lee123 replied on 24 Mar 2009
links worked for me
burypromote

+54
Dolphinboy2u replied on 21 Oct 2012
Yep, links are quite dead at this date.
burypromote
-5

-8
convergencesite commented on 01 Oct 2008
This is also known as the "Option Key" and is built into the OS.

Convergencesite
[Version 2.1.2]

1 Reply

burypromote
+3

+4
ars replied on 01 Oct 2008
You clearly did not read what the developer has in mind, he says:

Leaving the machine at the EFI boot picker (hold down the option key at startup), while possible, leaves the previous options open and also leaves the machine in a state in which it cannot be managed or accessed via the network.

This clearly shows he knows about the option key, but wants more functionality than that. Whether a single user needs that is open for debate, but clearly he is talking about managing the boot-up of several Macs in a lab environment.
burypromote

+2
Oscar74 commented on 20 Jul 2007
Unless you are using more than Windows and OS X on an Intel Mac, I don't really see the value of this software. AFAIK, you cannot set a firmware password on an Intel Mac since it uses EFI as opposed to the Open Firmware of previous G-series Macs. Just press the Option key on startup and you will be presented with icons for booting into either OS X or Windows XP, even multiple versions on different partitions/disks if available, using no additional boot-picker software (such as this).
[Version 1.2]

2 Replies

burypromote
+1

+4
amcan12 replied on 20 Jul 2007
Quote from Apple:

"Intel-based Macintosh computers can be protected by firmware passwords as well. The firmware in an Intel-based computer uses Extended Firmware Interface (EFI) technology-Open Firmware is used in computers that use PowerPC processors.

All Intel-based Macintosh computers support firmware password protection."

Read entire article here:

http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=106482
burypromote

+141
gazman replied on 27 Jul 2007
Although not installed by the Install Disks, Open Firmware Password.app is present on the disks that came with my MacBook. I used Pacifist to install it into my Utilities folder where it works like a charm.
burypromote

+1

A J Benamu reviewed on 02 May 2007
I configured this and it doesn´t work. My iMac boots by pressing Option key or using the Apple Remote, the screen never appears.
[Version 1.1]


burypromote
Mattman85 had trouble on 31 Mar 2010
I was doing some remote sessioning with my windows, and since I would need to restart a few times, I set BootPicker to default to WinXP. now, I can't boot into OSX! Is there a way to be able to get in and uninstall it?!

I've already tried:
a) holding in Option key and choosing Mac - BootPicker loads after Mac login window appears..

b) logging into Windows, and choosing "Boot into Mac" from BootCamp..
[Version 2.1.2]



weftech rated on 17 Jan 2012

[Version 2.1.2]


Downloads:27,561
Version Downloads:21,700
Type:Utilities : System
License:Free
Date:29 Aug 2012
Platform:Intel 32 / OS X
Price:Free0.00
Overall (Version 2.x):
Features:
Ease of Use:
Value:
Stability:
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BootPicker ... With the advent of Boot Camp comes the possibility of deploying multi-boot Macs and permitting your end users to choose whichever platform will work best for whatever they'd like to do at the moment. But how do you manage the presentation of this choice? There are a couple concerns to keep in mind:
  • Setting the boot device is an activity restricted to administrative users.
  • Allowing non-administrative users access to this functionality potentially allows them to set the boot device to some external media that they provide (then they can really tamper with the system).
  • Leaving the machine at the EFI boot picker (hold down the option key at startup), while possible, leaves the previous options open and also leaves the machine in a state in which it cannot be managed or accessed via the network. rEFIt allows you to lock down the boot options at startup, however you're still unable to actually manage the machine in this state.


  • Before developing BootPicker, I came up with a list of requirements that I would insist upon were I to manage a lab of dual-boot Macs:
    1. Must work when a firmware password is applied to the machine
    2. The boot picker cannot interfere with remote administration (e.g. via ARD)
    3. The boot picker must allow the administrator to specify explicitly which drives are permitted as boot devices
    4. The administrator can disable (remotely) the boot picker at any time
    5. When the machine is rebooted, it will always boot to Mac OS X by default and present the boot picker
    6. Optionally, the boot picker preferences can be managed via directory services (permits management at a large scale)
    7. Optionally, the boot picker should allow the administrator to provide some guidance to the end user about why they should choose one OS over another


    BootPicker satisfies all of these requirements. BootPicker runs on startup immediately prior to LoginWindow. Based upon your configuration, it presents an option to the end user to choose an operating system. Upon choosing that OS, the machine either continues to Mac OS X or reboots to the specified OS. The next time the computer is rebooted, it automatically returns to Mac OS X and the boot picker. Finally, for environments that require management at a large scale, or management while the machines are turned off or booted to a different OS, BootPicker can be managed via a Mac OS X Server Open Directory Master. Got AD? That's OK, you can leverage that as well. You can even run BootPicker from a logout script to give every new visitor to your lab machines the opportunity to choose their OS without rebooting.

    BootPicker is free as in beer and free as in speech. That means there's no charge to use it and even the source code is available. If you'd like to tweak, modify, localize, or just peek at the source code to BootPicker, you can browse the source here or download via subversion as indicated at the Bombich Software Sourcecode Repository.


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