iFreeMem
iFreeMem
1.0

2.6

iFreeMem free download for Mac

iFreeMem1.0

13 December 2009

Maximize free memory for better application performance.

Overview

iFreeMem... Free system memory for better application performance. A quick and easy alternative to either a reboot or RAM upgrade to get defragmented free memory.

If you are in the middle of using an application and the system becomes unresponsive for several seconds it could be the memory manager organising free memory for your application to use. IFreeMem clears Inactive memory to help your applications avoid the performance hit you get when running low on Free memory. You could think of it like a RAM upgrade.

Especially useful for users of memory hungry applications, i.e.:

  • Musicians
  • DJ's
  • Graphic Designers
  • Final Cut Pro users
  • Photographers
  • Scientists
  • Parallels Desktop users
Rejuvenates old Machines and optimizes new machines.

What's new in iFreeMem

Version 3.5a (reports as 1.0 in the Finder): Release notes were unavailable when this listing was updated.

Join over 500,000 subscribers.

Subscribe for our newsletter with best Mac offers from MacUpdate.

How would you rate iFreeMem app?

42 Reviews of iFreeMem

Svf
15 December 2009
Version: 3.5a

Most helpful

Thank you Wayland Chin! So they are getting $18 to put a GUI on the purge command? Nice racket if you can get it. There's a sucker born every minute!
(10)
4
Strob
28 August 2014
Version: 1.0
I've been using this app for years on SL. It works perfectly well on my MBP. Not one problem with it and very effective in memory management. I highly recommend it on that system. I have not tested it on subsequence versions of Mac OS.
(0)
bbw7
15 February 2013
Version: 1.0
There are plenty of free "apps" (if you could call something that just does the terminal command equivalent of "purge) that do the same thing. And you can just type "purge [Return]" in a terminal to get the same affect. And then there is apparently some issue of some tracker that is installed with this software. It's the MacKeeper of RAM purger apps.
(0)
0.5
Nontroppo
21 September 2011
Version: 1.0
Do people still fall for this hoax software!?! Please save yourselves money and read why memory optimisation is a hoax. http://www.windowsitpro.com/article/internals-and-architecture/the-memory-optimization-hoax This was written by the very well respected sysinternals and microsoft engineer for the windows VM manager and broadly applies as much to the darwin kernel VM.
(1)
Show comment (1)
GeogProf
20 September 2011
Version: 1.0
Thanks Tommy_b, I was just about to plunk down $16.25 for iFreeMem when I read your post warning that it sabotages purchasers’ privacy by installing the much loathed, privacy-challenged eSellerate purchaser identification framework without disclosing or announcing itself or asking permission. Well Activata, you just lost another sale for being too sneaky, chums. I hope you’ll take that lesson to heart and excoriate it from your wares.
(3)
anonymous-tapir-4715
04 August 2011
Version: 1.0
Freezing my MBPro in Lion. Too bad.
(0)
Show comment (1)
gatovadio
07 June 2011
Version: 1.0
here's some software from a japanese developer to free inactive memory on your mac. it's completely free and seems to work very well (no need to install developer tools). the webpage and readme files are in japanese but the apps are localized in english, italian and japanese. http://tama-san.com/?page_id=2 --libera memory for manual operation. just launch it and click on 'release'. there's also a 'quit visible processes' option in the 'file' menu to quit all windowed processes. save your work if you plan to use it. i translated a part of the readme and i figured out that if you rename the app from 'libera memory.app' to 'libera memory auto[1-9].app' (a number between 1 and 9 after 'auto'), when you launch it it will do a release the amount of times specified by that number and automatically quit, providing an automatic operation as long as it's launched. --libera memory resident for full automatic operation. after launching it, specify the time interval and the threshold value in mb, to check for inactive memory. after saving, and from what i understand from the readme file, it writes to ~/Library/Application Support/Libera Memory Resident/LiberaMemory.php for the saved settings and ~/Library/LaunchAgents/com.tama-san.LiberaMemoryLaunchd.plist to execute the settings without having the app open, through launchd. you can also view a log in the 'file' menu.
(1)
Show comments (4)
BrilorSoftware
01 June 2011
Version: 1.0
If Developer tools are installed, go to a Terminal window and type purge. The cost: FREE. There are free wrappers for the purge command ( I wrote one ).
(3)
Svf
15 December 2009
Version: 3.5a
Thank you Wayland Chin! So they are getting $18 to put a GUI on the purge command? Nice racket if you can get it. There's a sucker born every minute!
(10)
1
LeMerlot
27 November 2009
Version: 3.5
I used iFreeMem for many years successfully but 3.5 is also not working for me under 10.6. Snow Leo. Pity!
(2)
Show comments (2)
2
zx
02 November 2009
Version: 3.5
3.5 not working under 10.6
(2)
2
Eric•Woehler
30 October 2009
Version: 3.5
Seems to work by dumping RAM contents to swap files. I ran this and now I have 6 swap files where before I had just the one! So the trade off is less RAM used but with more and slower swap files - can't see the benefit!!
(4)
5
anonymous-tapir-4715
24 October 2009
Version: 3.5
Sorry, guys, this handy little app frees up active memory (using MenuMeters as my gauge) and the result is not to slow things down, but, duh, Safari for example runs faster. I don't care if it's emptying file caches or whatever your various theories are, I am not imagining the app speed increase that results from running iFreeMem.
(3)
Trondah
23 October 2009
Version: 3.5
This app should be renamed to "File cache cleaner", and it's feature list should read "makes your system slower by not using RAM".
(7)
3
Helmers
13 September 2009
Version: 3.0
The application works with a fairly basic concept: Force the system to load a large chunk of mumbo-jumbo, then release it. I tried this in a "perfect scenario". My MacBook had spent the night copying files, and all the normally "free" memory was marked as "inactive". After pressing the optimize button I got it all back. As some say, this is not very difficult to do, and normally OSX does a great job of managing memory. It is also not a substitute for having sufficient memory, as iFreeMem does not magically create memory, it simply forces the system to empty all its buffers.
(1)
Easer
22 August 2008
Version: 3.0
I honestly wonder if this works. I ran VMfusion, which ate up pretty much all of my remaining memory. After I quit, I ran iFreeMem. Although the graph visually says I "recovered" a lot of memory, my computer still ran about as sluggish as it did right after I quite VMfusion. It most certainly did not run as fast as it would if I restarted.
(1)
Show comment (1)
Someonenew
30 July 2008
Version: 3.0
"Defragment memory" ? That must surely be a joke?! That's just proposterous! Fragmentation is a mechanical phenomenon that cannot, by definition, occur in memory. This is definitely snake oil. You must be a fool to actually pay for this rubbish.
(6)
Show comments (2)
Foulger
09 June 2008
Version: 2.5.1
Sure there are plenty of Applications/Utilities that do the same thing and one can enter a unix command & also optimise RAM but ifreemem is in the menubar, memory use can be seen and clicking on optimise takes just a small amount of time. For me that saves money each time I use it. The author has offered it for sale, if you like it then pay for it, if you don't then use something else. Its just so convenient and can be used with very little waste of time. As a codicil, I would, however exhort my oft used advice "Halve the price & triple the profit"
(1)
Xplicit
05 June 2008
Version: 2.5
Thanks Dana for telling that it works as advertised, because I get slow downs on a MBP with 2GB RAM. That is without even starting the "killer" apps, like PS and such. And I don't agree to 2GB not being enough memory.
(1)
Dana-Sutton
11 April 2008
Version: 2.5
Well, for better or worse it works as advertised. Use it, you get significantly more free memory. But nearly twenty bucks for a gizmo like this is i. m. h. o. unacceptably steep. I'd spring for about five, tops. If you have so little memory that you really need it, you probably would be better advised to start saving your pennies and buy more RAM.
(0)
Mac-Kiwi
25 February 2008
Version: 2.0
If you clean the cache-folders by an apple-script, you have the same effect. Applescript is for free and integrated in OSX.
(0)
Show comments (2)
Physicsguy
24 February 2008
Version: 2.0
You shouldn't have much free memory. What you want to make sure of is that your free + inactive memory isn't low. The reason people see slowdowns when they run this program is that you're effectively deleting a bunch of cached data (like Safari tabs you aren't currently viewing) from memory, so you have to reload it from disk. Here's an Apple document that goes over the types of memory you see in Activity Monitor and what they mean: http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=107918
(0)
Foulger
24 February 2008
Version: 2.0
I've been using the trial for two days and it appears to be making things more zippy. I'll use it till the trial expires and if I conclude that it speeds things up overall I will buy it.
(0)
4
Joe12south
24 February 2008
Version: 2.0
This app is nothing like SpeedDoubler. It reorganizes memory to eliminate fragments, and it does so simply and effectively. If you're a power user that uses memory hungry applications (you know who you are) than this app is a nice tool to have to avoid rebooting.
(0)
3
Syros
24 February 2008
Version: 2.0
it doesnt worth 10 pounds, it would better if it was a freeware,
(0)
Show comments (2)
Mac-Kiwi
24 February 2008
Version: 2.0
LOL! Remember "Speeddoubler", "RAM-Doubler" ... Apps for the trash ...
(0)
Show comment (1)
Chris-Habig
24 February 2008
Version: 2.0
This program is a total, ineffective waste of time. Free memory is by definition memory that isn't being used. There is no way that unused memory can make the system or any particular application faster.
(0)
Show comment (1)
5
Igreg
24 February 2008
Version: 2.0
Wow. My initial reaction on trying it once is that this is very useful. There was a similar program available in the classic OS days, but can not remember its name. This is faster and more practical than rebooting. Besides, excessive rebooting just puts that extra wear and tear on the hardware. I will continue to use it during its 2 week trial period, and if it continues to work well, I am buying it.
(0)
Show comments (2)
5
Ibookg4user
16 February 2008
Version: 1.7.2
Hi tried this little app. because I read about it somewhere in web... . My G4 iBook (Tiger 10.4.11) has the maximum amount of memory it can have (1.25 Gb), but since I usually keep nearly a dozen of running application, I often felt slowing down and the coloured spinning ball come out very often! The only solution to that was, of course, to reboot!! In this moment I've got 11 applications open, some of them rather heavy, and Firefox with 10 tabs! And all is going speedy, thanks to this little utiliy! A good value for who cannot have 2 or more GB of ram!!
(0)
2
Ray16
08 December 2007
Version: 1.7.2
It seems that 1.7.0 is the last stable for version 10.3.9 1.7.2 still doesn't work for Panther.
(0)
Ray16
08 November 2007
Version: 1.7.2
Does 1.7.2 work with Panther??? Developer this has been slow to answer!
(0)
Show comment (1)
4
Ray16
07 November 2007
Version: 1.7.2
1.7.2 has the same problem as I poeted below.....
(0)
5
Ray16
24 October 2007
Version: 1.7
There was a bug in the 10.3.9 Version. Within a day I set the bug report to the Developer, and it was fixed right away. So to Mac OS ( the post below ) get a life, and do your software homework. If the link above doesn't work, this one will..... http://activata.co.uk/downloads_files/iFreeMem-1-7-0.dmg.zip
(0)
sjk
19 July 2007
Version: 1.6.5
I'm not sure exactly what iFreeMem does but have noticed that certain Spotlight searches (a single character seems particularly effective) will trigger the mds background process to run for a bit and usually reallocate as much of Inactive memory as possible to Free. And running a SuperDuper! backup has a similar Inactive-to-Free memory reallocation side effect. What I *really* want is some way to clean up after misbehaving apps that consume large amounts of virtual memory swap space that's never reclaimed after they've quit. A blatant example of this symptom is easily reproduced when Toast multiplexes EyeTV recordings while a few other commonly used apps are running. The number of swapfiles can increase from 2 to 6 on my 2GB iMac G5 as swap space usage jumps from a couple hundred MB to over 1.5GB and system performance significantly deteriorates. After Toast quits (when it doesn't fail with malloc errors first) swap space usage remains high and the system is still sluggishly crippled, requiring a logout or restart to get back to normal. A similar "vm blowout" scenario can occur infrequently with certain other app usage combinations, but it's unavoidable during Toast's EyeTV multiplexing unless it's being run basically standalone (which is highly impractical). And Roxio remains uninterested in finding/fixing the problem, at most blaming OS X memory management. If there were an acceptable workaround for that kind of memory usage snafu to save time and hassle of unwanted logouts and restarts (which really shouldn't be necessary) I'd seriously consider paying for it. Certain Unix-based systems are better than OS X at being temporarily brought to their knees by rogue memory usage, yet still be able to recover and run normally again after any offending processes are killed or stop running.
(0)
5
Sprocket999
17 July 2007
Version: 1.6.4
I'm using a G4 PowerBook (1.5ghz PPC) with a measely 512 mbs of RAM. After a failed attempt with 1.6.4, I found a copy of 1.6.2. Wow! THAT version did the trick for me and I did find this retrieved 'stuck' memory very very well. I have now bought this and am happily using this 2-4 times a day. Previously, I would run Disk Utility and repair permissions. That gave back 'some' of the stuck memory but it was also slow. I only gave this a 4 out 5 because I find the app icon in the dock redundant, since the actual work is done by a graph in the Menu Bar. My rating is by no means a reflection on how well this works, though. I highly recommended iFreeMem to anyone who opens and closes several apps throughout the day. (My PowerBook seems peppier too!)
(0)
3
Threedee912
28 May 2007
Version: 1.6
Appears to do the same kind of memory management as the weekly maintenance script, by 'removing' inactive memory. You could do this easily for free.
(0)
5
anonymous-tapir-4715
17 May 2007
Version: 1.5.1
Superb. I had no idea performance could be increased like this. Keep it in your dock and everytime things slow down, run it. You'll see! Big, measurable "RAM" boost.
(0)
Ankst
07 May 2007
Version: 1.5
Do it yourself for free... Open Terminal, then type "sudo periodic weekly".
(1)
Show comments (2)
Luhmann
24 April 2007
Version: 1.4
I've been using this for a while now and I do think it helps. The real question is why? I think it helps out most where there are some programs that have problems in how they handle memory, like Firefox. If this is the case, the big question is whether it doesn't just make more sense to identify those programs and quit and relaunch those programs rather than using iFreeMem. Quitting and relaunching a troublesome app seems like a better solution as it doesn't create a lag in the running of currently running apps as iFreeMem does.
(0)
Show comment (1)
2
Nontroppo
13 April 2007
Version: 1.3
Memory managers are a dubious area of software. Users appear critically sensitive to the amount of free RAM, and assume the larger this number the faster things will be. Operating systems designers and many systems engineers believe the opposite. For informed opinions, please see: http://www.bitsum.com/winmemboost.asp http://www.windowsitpro.com/Article/ArticleID/41095/41095.html Both articles are highly critical of memory 'optimization'. I have tried using iFreeMem for a several days. Now, in the limited scenario that I am starting an application for the first time, that i have lots of other apps open BUT don't care about their performance, iFreeMem creates a bit of headroom. But the whole system becomes more sluggish. The benefit of slightly reduced loadtime of data is offset by the severe performance hit as *every* other application has to page its data back in. Most usage scenarios I tried simply caused my machine to beachball for seconds after "optimizing" my memory. In general if you are using more than one app, you will significantly damage your performance until everything is paged back into memory which gets you back where you started. If you don't mind grinding your disk only to get one app to have more headroom, then go ahead. In terms of design, it appears well programmed and the memory monitor is nice.
(0)
Treasons
07 March 2007
Version: 1.1
This may work for some, but here's my experience on an Intel iMac with 2G RAM: 1. With multiple programs running, including Safari with multiple tabs open, my system had about 25MB free RAM. 2. I ran iFreeMem, and suddenly had about 600MB free RAM. Quite a feat, I thought. Usually I have to quit Safari and other programs, then restart them to reclaim the huge amounts of memory they consume after a day or two of heavy use. 3. When I went to actually use Safari, switching from one tab to the next took 10-20 seconds (with the spinning beachball). Copying to iClip took longer than usual, and some items weren't copied at all. In short, the first time I used each application after running iFreeMem, it was incredibly slow. 4. After an hour or so or operation, my free memory is back down to 75MB, a little better than where I began, but nothing to write home about. To summarize, iFreeMem appears to free up all the memory that applications use to speed up their operation. I can regain memory much more quickly by quitting and restarting my memory hog programs. There seems to be little if any benefit to running this program.
(0)
Show comment (1)
5
Larsen2k4
07 March 2007
Version: 1.1
I've been testing iFreeMem for a week now - every time my Mac mini G4 becomes a bit slower because of using tons of apps (especially while using Final Cut Express) - just one click in this neat little app and the system runs like just being started. I'll buy it now and I can absolutely recommend it.
(0)
5
Maccooper
07 March 2007
Version: 1.1
This is a great time saver! I use to have to reboot to get back memory. I can recommend this program to everyone! Where has this been my whole OSX life?! Congrats to the developer for providing this great app!.
(0)