CSS Optimizer X
CSS Optimizer X
1.1

4.8

CSS Optimizer X free download for Mac

CSS Optimizer X

1.1
03 December 2005

Compress Web development files.

Overview

CSS Optimizer X is a Cocoa GUI for the command line application CSS Optimizer. It provides graphic access to all of CSS Optimizers features along with many Mac OS X features such as drag n' drop, sheets, and drawers.

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2 CSS Optimizer X Reviews

Rate this app:

Anonymous
24 May 2005

Most helpful

Seems okay. Does what it says it does, but requires that you be comfortable enough with the command line to use it. A GUI, drag-drop front end that recursively could process a set of folders would be a nice addition. There's also a small bug in this. It refuses to acknowledge the output filename you specify, instead using the same name as the input file with "_stripped" appended to it. This sucks as it forces you to rename each file in order to actually use them after processing.
Like
Version 0.7
Anonymous
12 June 2005
This is a very useful tool, and easy to use now for professional graphic/design developers for internet. To the developer: You should still distribute the command line version for server realtime processing on upload. The should also be more features, such as: keep whitespace, make short-hand, make commentaries more visible (/**---------Commentary---------**/) etc etc.
Like
Version 1.0
1 answer(s)
Anonymous
Anonymous
13 June 2005
The command line version is still available on the produce page.
Like
Version 1.0
Anonymous
24 May 2005
Seems okay. Does what it says it does, but requires that you be comfortable enough with the command line to use it. A GUI, drag-drop front end that recursively could process a set of folders would be a nice addition. There's also a small bug in this. It refuses to acknowledge the output filename you specify, instead using the same name as the input file with "_stripped" appended to it. This sucks as it forces you to rename each file in order to actually use them after processing.
Like
Version 0.7
1 answer(s)
Anonymous
Anonymous
25 May 2005
"It refuses to acknowledge the output filename you specify, instead using the same name as the input file with "_stripped" appended to it. This sucks as it forces you to rename each file in order to actually use them after processing." Thanks for the bug report, I'll fix that in the next release. You can save the processed CSS data to the same file by using the -n option.
Like
Version 0.7