MacKrack
MacKrack
1.5.3

4.2

HomeSecurityMacKrack
MacKrack free download for Mac

MacKrack1.5.3

05 August 2006

Password cracking utility.

Overview

MacKrack is a password hash brute forcer, supporting the Crypt, MD5 SHA-1, and Salted SHA-1 algorithms. It has two modes: dictionary and keyspace brute force. The brute force mode supports the lowercase alphabet, entire alphabet, and alphanumeric cracking, with a variable maximum password length of 1-10 characters.

What's new in MacKrack

Version 1.5.3:
  • Improved performance and stability
  • Fixed bug with text crash

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How would you rate MacKrack app?

30 Reviews of MacKrack

Anonymous
10 April 2005
Version: 1.4

Most helpful

Actually it does call home, and report to me all the passwords you cracked along with your IP address, email address, name, address, phone number, weight, and the names of your children. I review it all while cackling demonically, and promptly sell all the information to the Russians (none in particular). But seriously -- what does "I would bother with this dog" mean? Would you feel better if the application WASN'T free? Jeez... just because I write software for free my intentions are in question? Anyway, all password crackers are free as an unspoken rule (LC aside, because its creators are the evil capitalists). Which is not to mention that all the software I've ever written is free. Anyway -- as mentioned by neil_m, Little Snitch is a good program to make sure apps aren't calling home.
(2)
St00pid-M0nk3y
05 August 2006
Version: 1.5.3
Is there any documentation on how to use this thing?
(0)
Show comment (1)
4.75
Juliew
05 December 2005
Version: 1.5.1
MacKrack worked perfectly for me. Downloaded and ran it, entered my admin password, it extracted the hashes for all users on my system and tested their strength. One of 14 user passwords was cracked within 24 hours and I alerted the user to change their password. Thank you for a great implementation and - as far as I have found - the only program that handles the salted sha1 hashes from tiger on its own. Good work!
(0)
Anonymous
17 July 2005
Version: 1.5
What is this "most dishonest crackers are located offshore..." crap? What sort of idiotic comment is that?
(0)
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Anonymous
17 July 2005
Version: 1.5
That's hilarious -- the app actually asks you for your password in order to extract the local password! I certainly hope most aren't so gullible to walk past that one.
(0)
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Anonymous
10 April 2005
Version: 1.4.3
I just wanted to make sure, as the developer, that everyone understands that macKrack doesn't actually phone home whether for version checking or any other purposes. It doesn't make any network connections at all, and anyone with basic knowledge of how to use tcpdump or Little Snitch could verify that. So don't worry. I was just kidding before about the Russians....
(0)
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Anonymous
10 April 2005
Version: 1.4.3
Some reviewers have expressed concern that MacKrack might "call home" and reveal cracked passwords and other personally identifying information. The reason I doubt this is because it would be blatantly obvious to detect and document it. Only a dishonest cracker located offshore would attempt such a thing. How about an installer that asks for your admin password? How do you know it's not really the program doing this and phoning home? The way around a lot of this is to distribute code under the GPL so users can judge for themselves if anything is phoning home by reading the code. Does Adobe software phone home when you run it? Does iTunes? Does RealOne. How about Azureus or eDonkey? Muahaahahh!
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Anonymous
10 April 2005
Version: 1.4.3
Excellent! I'm a bit disappointed though it doesn't send all my info to the FBI, tut tut, where would we be without paranoia. Nice app and useful (although not everyday), Thanks.
(0)
Anonymous
10 April 2005
Version: 1.4.3
I think the phrase is: "I would not bother with this dog", but then again I am just guessing.
(0)
Anonymous
10 April 2005
Version: 1.4
Actually it does call home, and report to me all the passwords you cracked along with your IP address, email address, name, address, phone number, weight, and the names of your children. I review it all while cackling demonically, and promptly sell all the information to the Russians (none in particular). But seriously -- what does "I would bother with this dog" mean? Would you feel better if the application WASN'T free? Jeez... just because I write software for free my intentions are in question? Anyway, all password crackers are free as an unspoken rule (LC aside, because its creators are the evil capitalists). Which is not to mention that all the software I've ever written is free. Anyway -- as mentioned by neil_m, Little Snitch is a good program to make sure apps aren't calling home.
(2)
Show comment (1)
Anonymous
08 April 2005
Version: 1.4
Can anyone verify that this thing does not "call home" with other information. A free application that can crack passwords sound a bit suspicious to me. I would bother with this dog.
(0)
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Anonymous
25 January 2005
Version: 1.3
On an iMac and an eMac here, the program gives me "OS X is not configured by default to use an Open Firmware password" when I know that both have Open Firmware passwords set. Running OS X 10.3.4 on both, I believe.
(0)
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Anonymous
23 October 2004
Version: 1.3
Guns for example.. They are used to commit crimes and people say they should be outlawed. OK, now they are outlawed, which keeps the legitimate people from using them. I doubt the criminals are not going to go buy a gun on the black market because they are illegal. Denying the public or "public domain" anything that can be used either legitimately or illegitamately is a mistake. Anything can be used to commit a crime, that is no reason to outlaw it. There are still legitimate uses. I don't know what communist country you grew up in, but I enjoy my freedom. Secrecy is not security. Open source and tested software has been proven to be the most secure because it is audited and tested. That is the whole point of testing something, to make it better. Yet you want to deny that ability to legitimate users? That sounds very closed minded and ignorant to think if it is not tested, it will somehow make it more secure. That the tools should only be released in private to a select few. You sound like a Windows user to me.
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4.25
Anonymous
05 July 2004
Version: 1.3
Wonderful software. Provides very nice functionality. The nice thing about software such as this is that it allows security freaks (like me) to gauge security of computer systems. We can argue all day about how software like this is mindless and can only cause problems, but my view is that if more people know how to crack low security, then better security implementations will be developed and used - thus bettering the world.
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4
Anonymous
26 June 2004
Version: 1.3
Like Sheriff Rosco P. Coltrane said: "I love it, I love it, I love it! Good-good, good, good!"
(0)
Anonymous
25 June 2004
Version: 1.3
Software like this serves no purpose beyond illegality and ill will. The creation of software like this is inevitable as Apple aims for the popular market. Next on the list are viruses, trojan horses and other computer experience ruining scum by punks with inferiority complexes attempting to lash out at the world for their own lack of self worth. Did the undoubtedly talented creators of this software, like the creators of so many weapons befor them, ever stop to think of the destructive force their creation would inflict? Once again a small group of people do something "because we can" with no regard to consequence, and ruin it for the rest of the world.
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Anonymous
19 June 2004
Version: 1.22
To all the people who have something against software that tests and breaks security, why do you believe this is wrong? Is it not the users right to have available the software they want, or the author to write the software they want? Is it not the right of every user to test their own security to improve it or to see the tools that are going to be used to break into computer systems that are available in the underground community? Is it not a law enforcements right to be able to have a tool against certain security precautions to have evidence against child pornographers and terrorists? Or a person to be able to break back into their own system whether the passowrd was lost, stolen, or changed? Is it not the right of an educational system to have the right to learn about security and security precaustions by looking at tools that are used to attack that said security. Should we shut down BitTorrent because someone downloads an illegal file using it, or web browsers for that matter. Sicne computers can copy store bought dvds, does this mean we should outlaw computers altogether like the mpaa suggests? Or for that matter, what about that racist peice of literature you have, should we ban certain types of information and try to regulate every book that comes into this country. What about free thought? I believe a lot of people have unpure thoughts at times. Or cars, I hear people have used those to aid in bank robberies before. Give people the benifit of the doubt, they are not all criminals, theifs, and hackers. Please, before you bash software that can be abused, try to be more optimistic.
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4.25
Anonymous
06 May 2004
Version: 1.22
Works fine and the developer keeps improving it. We need this kind of tools. The more we have, the more improved security we'll have in our systems. Remember that we are now in a *nix based system and connecting to the Internet is as easy as pluging your mac to your phone line. Old days died, new ones are here and we need tons of security which we didn't past times. And this kind of apps most probably should be concibed primarily within Apple's engineers' brains.
(0)
Ancientyger
06 May 2004
Version: 1.22
I thought Mac people "weren't" interested in such destructive behavior. I thought we were encouraging a "safer" more "secure" environment not trying to promote the willful destablization of the network of tool that we've come to enjoy. I figured what we've all learned is that it doesn't take much coaxing to make humans ignore apples, oranges, pears or even life if they think they can obtain the dreams of avarice. Can we learn nothing from Eden? Please, don't leave this tree in the center of our Garden.... at this point, we don't even need a serpent to do the coaxing....
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Anonymous
06 May 2004
Version: 1.22
The idea that this is intended by its author to be a "security protection tool" and that any ethical problems involved with using this software rest solely on the end-user is, to put it mildly, disingenuous. Licensed locksmiths are allowed to possess lock-picking tools, it is against the law for anybody else to have them. I think right here we have the software analogue of for just that. I hope that the good people at MacUpdate will remove this from their site pronto.
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Anonymous
06 May 2004
Version: 1.2
Although I don't feel that I should release macKrack as a new version because the changes I made to code were small, the effect is large. The new binary from the site is version 1.22 as of right now, and it is MUCH faster than all previous, maybe on the order of 2 or 3 times.
(0)
Anonymous
21 April 2004
Version: 1.2
yes, a serious memory leak in 1.2... now repaired and changed to 1.21.... available at same download link.
(0)
4.25
Anonymous
21 April 2004
Version: 1.2
jeepers! Just attempted a crack on a single password from 6 to 8 characters in length, using keyspace (A-9) but gave up after it created 5 swap files 108 thousand pageouts, and didn't show any signs of stopping soon. hmmm. is that supposed to happen?
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Anonymous
21 April 2004
Version: 1.2
To respond to the last poster: To say that MacKrack is unethical is ridiculous. MacKrack is a security analysis tool, designed to be used by system administrators to check for weak user passwords. Tools aren't unethical; it is those who use tools unethically that are unethical.
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Anonymous
20 April 2004
Version: 1.2
Unethical, period.
(0)
4.5
Anonymous
14 April 2004
Version: 1.1
This program is very clean, and simple enough to figure out on your own if you know what you need. It is very straight forward. It has a nice interface and was put together cleanly. As for whether or not it works, I do not have anything I need cracked, but I have in the past. The next time I do run into something, I will have this program in my application folder and hope it works then. ;) I am curious if this will crack md5 shadow passwords, or password files, on Linux systems. That would be very useful if it could. The only thing that this program lacks, is MORE features! It does it's specific job as Im sure was intended, but most users who download these programs might more like a all-in-one sollution to their password cracking needs. Though this would be asking a lot Im sure.
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Fsb-software
14 April 2004
Version: 1.1
Thanks to last poster for providing some wordlist URL.. Here's the URL I would use and you should definitely check out if you're looking for wordlists-- the definitive collection: http://packetstormsecurity.nl/Crackers/wordlists/ p.s. mackrack is unrelated to unix crack, or the old OS 9 program mackrack, or any other program ever written with a similar sounding name
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3
Jimw
14 April 2004
Version: 1.1
I have done some research for interested parties. This program is derivied from a Unix program called Crack written by a fellow by the name of Muffet. It requires a word listing or dictionary to use it. Unfortunately the provider provides no documentation or dictionary. However my research has lead me to a site of extensive dictionaries for the product. While they are designed for the Unix version they should work for the Mac version as well. The compressed image can be opened with Stuffit Expander. While you can only use a single word list at a time, their is nothing keeping you from combining several list into a single document. Just be sure to save it as a plain text document. Hope this helps. The dictionary site is: ftp-//ftp.ox.ac.uk/pub/wordlists/.ftploc
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Fsb-software
14 April 2004
Version: 1.1
Hi, I'm the developer of this app, my name is Braden. Apparently I didn't give enough information (read the read me file included), and my website doesn't have much info, but it's certainly no trojan. Regarding the file format it cracks, it only accepts text files, one as a dictionary (if in dictionary mode) and the other as a password file. The password file should contain hashes in MD5 or SHA1. It won't crack stuffit files, and is primarily designed for people who want to descrypt passwords from databases or web applications. If you don't know what MD5 or SHA1 are, don't download it.
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Anonymous
14 April 2004
Version: 1.1
He does not explain to much and his webpage is just to simple with no info. i tould be a trojan. !!! 8-|
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Anonymous
14 April 2004
Version: 1.1
dont get it - what kind of file format is this suppose to krack - doesn't work with stuffit files that are password protected
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