ThermographX
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(5) 2.8

Monitor temperature sensors in G4/G5 Macs.   Shareware ($7.00)
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ThermographX monitors the various temperature sensors inside your modern Mac G4 or G5.
  • Records maximum and minimum temperatures.
  • Shows temperature records over time, using a zoomable display so you can analyze short-term or long-term.
  • Shows individual sensor temperatures on models that have them.
ThermographX compatibility is still being determined. So far, it is known to provide accurate sensor readings on these models:
  • 12" & 17" PowerBook G4.
  • "Aluminum" 15" PowerBook G4.
  • "Mirror Door" G4.
  • Power Mac G5.
Note: Motorola's MPC7450CE/D Rev 5
What's New
Version 1.4.0:
  • Updated to Universal Binary for Intel-based Macs
  • Added sensor support for Intel-based Macs
  • Updated user measurements for all other models
Requirements
Intel/PPC, Mac OS X 10.3.9 or later



MacUpdate - ThermographX



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ThermographX User Discussion (Write a Review)
ver. 1.x:
(5)
Your rating: Now say why...
Overall:
(5)

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Anonymous reviewed on 01 Nov 2005
While I do understand why this utility exists, I do not understand why I should pay $7 for it. bresink's Temperature Monitor is much more customizable, and free. So I ask: Why pay?
[Version 1.3]


burypromote

+218
JimW commented on 10 Jun 2005
Frankly I have never understood the passion to monitor the temperature of the processors. As far as I know, you can't change it, other than cooling off the entire machine, or hacking your machine and risking serious damage. Besides you should not be running the machine in a hot environment anyway. I believe the machines have thermal cut-offs anyway (gets too hot, shuts down). So what is the big deal about the real time monitoring of a temperature sensor? You can do that in your home with an electronic thermometer and have something useful.

Then there is the issue of so many programmers wanting to write code to do this. I have seen close to a dozen of these. I may be an interesting learning experience, but to try and charge for something that has so little practical use, seems sort of inane to me. But then P.T. Barnum always seems to be proven right.

To summarize, if their is a real, honest, practical use for monitoring the CPU temperature, will someone please let me know. However if nothing gets posted, those reading this know how to save some money.
[Version 1.2.8]

7 Replies

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Anonymous commented on 11 Jun 2005
If you have an MDD mac you would know why :)

They are very loud and hot, so many of us MDD (as well as others) owners have swapped fans to quiet it down...and we need to know if it's too hot.

Anyone who upgrades their processor or overloads the tower with goodies, needs to know if it's too hot inside the case.
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Anonymous commented on 06 Oct 2005
So essentially what you are saying is that red light cameras should be banned because if you run the red light you will get caught and will not be able to deny it - i.e. If you overload your Mac, it might get too hot.

Simple solution - don't overload or hack your Mac, then you will not need to worry about such trinkets as this. If your requirements are such that you need such hardware, then you should be addressing the structure of the machine beforehand. You should be using an accessory chassis, purchasing a more robust machine, or upgrading the entire machine with more robust power supplies, fans, heat-sinks, etc. to accommodate what you plan to do beforehand. If you can't afford to do this, then you can't afford to push the machine beyond its specifications. Relying on a software utility to protect your machine that has been pushed is like playing Russian roulette or with fire. Sooner or later you will be burned. It is just a question of when.

In any case whether you agree or agree to disagree, I believe that over 90 percent of users have no need for this utility, and that the 10 percent that feel they do, would be better off doing other things to protect there machine.
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Anonymous commented on 06 Oct 2005
I had an iMac G5 that was misbehaving as its fans were constant coming on. This wonderful application helped me demonstrate that it was doing it while idling and not under high processor load and allowed me to compare it with a similar iMac and deduce there was a hardware issue and fix it.
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Anonymous commented on 06 Oct 2005
Without temperature monitors like this and others I would have never known my (unmodded) 20" G5 iMac was running so hot. Burnout would have been my first clue.

Of interest: Concerned about my overheating iMac I asked Apple how hot the fans should allow the CPU and HD to get? Their response was: "That is proprietary information"(!) They didn't seem too pleased I was able to monitor the internal heat.
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+218
Jimw replied on 06 Oct 2005
It is well that such a tool "saved" the commenter's machines. As I stated earlier, most do not need such a tool but I never denied that it could be useful in special unique occasions. In the mentioned cases above, one possible advantage of not monitoring an overheating, defective machine, is that it will "fry", allowing you to take it back to Apple and get it back with new insides (Apple usually does not fix things at component level), or a new machine, possibly with improved specs or mods to prevent the problem from happening again.

Of course you will need to have AppleCare to avert an expensive repair bill. Whenever I get a new machine I always get AppleCare with it, for support alone, such as it is. Nevertheless it is better than nothing or many of the other alternatives.

Sometimes just talking out problems with an agent will lead you to an idea that will solve the problem, even if the agent contributed little or nothing to the solution. I should also mention that in my experience, the price of AppleCare is one of the few items from Apple, via a 3rd party provider, that is negotiable.

As far as Apple not being enthusiastic about a user knowing as much or more about their own machine as the agent, you are "preaching to the choir." Apple seems to love keeping secret about specs and other useful information that can benefit users. They seem to have the mindset that all users are crooks and hackers, trying to steal something from the company, until it can be proved otherwise. Sometimes, trying to get some information from them, so that you can be more effective with your machine, is like pulling teeth from a live Piranha.

If you do decide you have a requirement for such a tool, I invite you to do some exploring on the subject in MacUpdate. This tool is not your only option for obtaining temperature information.

There are many competitors, some are Widgets,some are free. As for recommending one, I cannot, as I don't use them. I have AppleCare and have not modified or overloaded my machine. I also keep good backups, as everyone should. So if it "fry's" it might be slightly inconvenient, but it becomes Apple's problem.
burypromote
Anonymous commented on 06 Oct 2005
kids these days
burypromote
Anonymous commented on 02 Nov 2005
I think JimW is right in a way. But listen Jim, this is a geek thing: We want to know how much memory we heve left, which portion of that is wired or inactive, we want to know how hard the processor is working, and how this effects the temperature of the cpu. It's not usefull, but it's fun.
burypromote


Anonymous reviewed on 11 Feb 2005
worked great for awhile, now i cant get it to launch. maybe its a problem with 10.3.8. but i swear it ran for awhile under 10.3.8 .
[Version 1.2.6]


burypromote


Anonymous reviewed on 06 Feb 2005
If you want to monitor temps on a Dual G5 use THIS program (ThermographX). I've been using it for over 3 months and it's never gave me a problem and does everything I want it too. No bloatware and no KP's. Dang good piece of software.
[Version 1.2.6]


burypromote


Anonymous reviewed on 22 Jul 2004
If you want to monitor temps on a Dual G5, use "Temperature Monitor v2.0" which was released on July 20, 2004.
[Version 1.2.5]


burypromote


Anonymous reviewed on 14 Jul 2004
New version just like the last version does not work on dual G5. Temps dont change at all just stay where they start. Have written developer and his reply was "huh, thats odd?" Will not recommend this to anybody because of his(the developers) attitude. I paid for the registration. Wont buy anything from jeremy kiezer again.
Any number of utilities out there work great in reporting the temps in my G5. This one does not.
Dont blame it on using 10.3.4. I do and other utilities work under 10.3.4.
[Version 1.2.5]


burypromote


Anonymous reviewed on 12 Jul 2004
Program doesn't work on a Dual G5 under 10.3.4. Author apparently not interested in fixing this problem.
[Version 1.2.4]

2 Replies

burypromote
Anonymous commented on 13 Jul 2004
And a day after your snide, arrogant, numbskull comment, the author does indeed post an update. If I had a brand new Dual G5, I could find better things to do than whine over incompatible shareware. Grrr.
burypromote
Anonymous commented on 19 Jul 2004
Too bad the update DOESN'T FIX THE PROBLEM.
burypromote


Anonymous reviewed on 27 May 2004
Stopped working under 10.3.3. The app launches then auto-quits. Nothing, nadda.

Upgraded to 10.3.4, gave me an error about the sensors and I should upgrade to the latest app version. Upgraded the app, launched and it auto-quit as well.

My Mac: 2x2Ghz G5/ 512MB RAM
[Version 1.2.4]


burypromote


Anonymous reviewed on 29 Apr 2004
There is nothing to worry about if your powerbook/ibook is dissipating more heat than you expect: also the software may display inaccurate readings. This piece of software should be used for fun more than anything else in my opinion. Strangely Apple used to have sensors on the old powerbook g3 ranges, but took them away for the titanium powerbooks :( oh well have fun if your machine has a sensor...
[Version 1.2.3]


burypromote


Anonymous reviewed on 20 Dec 2003
If you have to worry about the temperatures within your MAC and especially your new G5, Apple needs to go back to the drawing board as this software is not the answer...it's a seven dollar bandage.
[Version 1.2.1]


burypromote

+1
Capn Hack had trouble on 27 May 2004
10.3.4 (out today) breaks this app on G5 machines, maybe some others too.
if you downloaded this and its not working then dont blame the app
[Version 1.2.4]


burypromote
Beatdigger had trouble on 12 Jan 2004
Can someone please list some more statistics? Does anyone else have an ibook g4? According to Apple, my ibook g4/800 is supposed to run no higher than 35c. I am getting as high as 60c with Thermograph when running multiple applications. Is this normal temp? Is Thermograph accurate? Help please.
[Version 1.2.2]


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Downloads:22,986
Version Downloads:1,270
Type:Utilities : System
License:Shareware
Date:24 Mar 2007
Platform:PPC 32 / Intel 32 / OS X
Price: $7.00
Overall (Version 1.x):
Features:
Ease of Use:
Value:
Stability:
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ThermographX monitors the various temperature sensors inside your modern Mac G4 or G5.
  • Records maximum and minimum temperatures.
  • Shows temperature records over time, using a zoomable display so you can analyze short-term or long-term.
  • Shows individual sensor temperatures on models that have them.
ThermographX compatibility is still being determined. So far, it is known to provide accurate sensor readings on these models:
  • 12" & 17" PowerBook G4.
  • "Aluminum" 15" PowerBook G4.
  • "Mirror Door" G4.
  • Power Mac G5.
Note: Motorola's MPC7450CE/D Rev 5 errata indicates "The thermal assist unit (TAU) is no longer supported on the MPC7450, MPC7451, or MPC7441.". Because of this, you will not be able to measure the junction temperature on any system with these processors. At current, this includes the "Gigabit" PowerBook G4 and the "2001 Quicksilver" G4's.


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