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Norton AntiVirus Definitions Reviews

20191010-002
10 October 2019

Virus definitions for Symantec/Norton AntiVirus.

mrsidoric
01 March 2019

Most helpful

INSTALL AT YOUR OWN RISK. Norton of any flavor risks loss of your data. It installs crap all over your computer with innocuous names that defy search and removal. Like bamboo – it also multiplies and expands. Even if you remove it – one missed tidbit can replicate the whole app again. THIS SHOULD BE CLASSED AS A VIRUS.
Like (4)
Version 20190301-001

Read 99 Norton AntiVirus Definitions User Reviews

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scfw
24 June 2019
It's a really bad idea to list the virus definition updates as software listing on macupdate. can a moderator fix that please?
Like (1)
Version 20190624-002
1 answer(s)
june8
june8
05 July 2019
Agree. As I wrote on Jan 18, 2019: I wonder why does MacUpdate list this virus definition update and not the application itself? Virus definition updates are being updated automatically within their applications and they wouldn't be open to comments and/or reviews..
Like
OsloX
10 May 2019
Just asking. Is a anti virus tool needed for macOS?
Like
Version 20190510-002
1 answer(s)
Mcr
Mcr
28 June 2019
So...the techie people will get all caught up in arguing about 'definition' of the term "virus", versus, zero day, versus PUP's and versus PUA's. Followed by comments that you don't need an anti virus program on the Mac because there are no Mac 'viruses'.

The common user does not care, nor should be expected to know, the difference between viruses, PUPs, root, zero-day exploits, etc. Lay people call of this 'viruses', or malware in general. And techies are doing a dis-service by insisting that 'no viruses' exist on the Mac when they hear lay people say they have a 'virus', because lay people then feel that no protection is needed at all.

The truth is the Mac is vulnerable to 'malware' whatever word or definition the techies want to call it. Apple macOS itself includes an engine to scan for known Mac malware, called XProtect. I am constantly helping friends, family, workers, remove PUPs, search engine hi-jackers, you name it. Macs are just as vulnerable to those as Windows. Technically, they are not viruses, but to lay people, that is irrelevant, all they know is, something isn't right, machine is not working as it should.

We in the tech industry need to stop responding to end users when we hear them say "I think I have a virus' with 'No you don't because Macs don't have viruses'. It doesn't accomplish anything, recognize they are using 'virus' to describe something they can't verbalize otherwise, because 'virus' is the general label that's been around for decades. I use the term malware to cover everything and users seem to respond to that better, in that whatever it is, the intent can be termed malicious, or certainly not in the best interest of the user. It defines the problem as one of intent and mis-behavior ,which lay people can relate too, versus technical definitions over how the problem is installed, transferred, replicated, manifests, etc. , which lay people don't care, understand anyway and eyes just glaze over when techies try to 'explain' it to them.

So, OsloX, do you need a MALWARE tool? If you answer yes to any of these questions, then it wouldn't hurt, and doesn't have to be paid version, the free versions are fine, just so long as you remember to scan manually regularly.

1) You share files with Windows users, especially in a business environment (as a good 'citizen' you should help prevent the spread of Windows malware even if it can't harm you....like illness, just because you may not be sick with the flu, you can still spread germs to others and make them sick, so be preventative.)
2) You visit new websites all the time, not necessarily knowing how reputable these sites are. You're not very cautious about just clicking on licks that interest you as you browse the Net, and often end up traversing a long list of sites and links from one site to the next.

3) You are active in social media, and it's not uncommon for you to click on a link to a video, site, news story from a social media post.

4) You use your Mac for work related work, not just personal. IN other words, you take work home with you and work on it on your personal home machine.

Norton, in my experience, is okay but not as good at finding or removing PUPs or PUA's (Potentially Unwanted Programs / POtentially Unwanted Apps). If you've ever had your search engine changed in your browser without your permission, that's an example of a PUP's. If you find you are constantly getting pop ups as you browse to buy something or visit something you don't even know where the pop up is coming from, that's possibly a PUP.

Malwarebytes has been good in my experience removing PUPs and PUA's, especially search engine hi jackers and loggers. NOrton is good at finding Windows viruses, etc embedded in data files you may have received from Windows users. Malwarebytes free version is sufficient, just run it manually on a regular basis. Uninstalls very cleanly if desired, comes with its own uninstaller. Don't use any of those 'app cleaners', they can often do more damage than good. Norton comes with its own uninstaller as well and in my experience, completely removes all traces of itself.
Like (1)
mrsidoric
01 March 2019
INSTALL AT YOUR OWN RISK. Norton of any flavor risks loss of your data. It installs crap all over your computer with innocuous names that defy search and removal. Like bamboo – it also multiplies and expands. Even if you remove it – one missed tidbit can replicate the whole app again. THIS SHOULD BE CLASSED AS A VIRUS.
Like (4)
Version 20190301-001
4 answer(s)
JBob2047
JBob2047
10 March 2019
This is nonsense. I've uninstalled Norton using Norton itself to do so and it was completely removed. A search everywhere turned up no remnants. Maybe you should learn how to use a computer!
Like (2)
mrsidoric
mrsidoric
10 March 2019
As an IT professional – I have often attempted to remediate the damage done to user systems. I have documented Norton damage and regeneration issues before. If your experience is different – GO FOR IT. Just do't call me to fix the damage. At my hourly rate – removing Norton is a good living.
Like (2)
Megavolt17
Megavolt17
03 May 2019
Ever heard of using the Symantec uninstaller? Removes even all the registration information (so you can do the free trial again if you want)
Like
Megavolt17
Megavolt17
19 July 2019
Your repeated identical posts are viruses. Every time someone posts a response or a question you repost the same 1/2 star rating and nonsensical "expert" opinion

I bet you have never used Norton since Windows 3.1, or you are a troll working for Kaspersky.
Like
june8
18 January 2019
I wonder why does MacUpdate list this virus definition update and not the application itself? Virus definition updates are being updated automatically within their applications and they wouldn't be open to comments and/or reviews..
Like (5)
Version 20190117-022
1 answer(s)
Megavolt17
Megavolt17
03 May 2019
I think is it if you have multiple computers to update, you only have to download it once for all of them. If you have fast, unlimited Internet there is little reason to update this way.
Like
NedC
09 July 2018
I can't believe that with all the bad comments about this, there are over 110 thousand downloads. Does this work or not?
Like (1)
Version 20180706-008
1 answer(s)
Megavolt17
Megavolt17
26 September 2018
Yes, and if you read antiviral reviews (AV-Comparatives, AV-Test, SE Labs, etc) it is typically rated as #1, #2 or rarely #3.

Not worth posting an honest review here because you will get hundreds of "we don need no stinkin' antivirus", people who say it's the worst (most confess they have never tried it, or not since MacOS 7).

I love the "educated" reviews saying things like it corrupted their Mac DLL files or their Mac Registry (neither of which are possible because they don't exist on a Mac).

Check out the recent, honest, educated reviews at https://www.av-test.org/en/antivirus/home-macos/
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JBob2047
15 June 2018
I've been using Norton Security Deluxe on my MacBook Pro for about a month and it is working perfectly. No system impact that I have noticed.
Like (1)
Version 20180613-020
Virtualruffy
19 September 2017
I can't believe this wookie dung still exists. Who in their right ind would use it? Where once Norton Symantec products were great now they are the joke of techs. Instead of snipe hunts we send our techs on norton hunts -to find a working valuable product. They never come back...
Like (4)
Version 09/18/2017
1 answer(s)
GForce
GForce
08 January 2018
Ha! I LOLed when I read your comment. Very witty! I remember the good old System 7 days of Norton Utilities for Mac where you got Norton Disk Doctor and Speed Disk. You could also purchase SAM (Symantec Antivirus for Macintosh). Those apps were best in class and I feel like Symantec is still riding the coattails of their former 1990s self.
Like (1)
mrsidoric
26 October 2016
BEWARE: ABSOLUTE TRASH – Norton/Symantec or whoever they are now are purveyors of malware. This crapware will harm your computer and is impossible to remove.
Like (3)
Version 10/26/2016
Jjpong
02 November 2013
I first started using Norton's antivirus software in 1994, I think. I won't support it any more. This software made itself a subscription product one day out of the blue without giving me a choice. I hope nobody will support their Mac version.
Like
Version 11/01/2013
Marcossi
12 October 2013
I believe Norton would be better of selling swim suites in the Antarctic. (The experts say, that in a couple of hundred years it will be warm there)
Like (3)
Version 10/11/2013
r2xman
21 August 2013
Norton is Turdware.
Like (4)
Version 08/20/2013
Shralldam
13 June 2013
What the…?! Almost 450 Mb for virus definitions?
Like (6)
Version 06/13/2013
1 answer(s)
MisterE
MisterE
29 July 2013
Right, 478.6 MB WTF?!?! I can't 52 people have downloaded this crap so far.
Like (2)
Jazzyguy
04 June 2013
They make the viruses so they have (raison etre) a reason to be in existence. If there were no viruses they would have no reason to be in existence so they simply make them!
Like (2)
Version 06/04/2013
Jwenrick
28 May 2013
I shouldn't even give it a half star. Norton used to write good software MANY years ago in Classic, but then screwed up royally when OS X came out. Does anybody even use their software anymore? Jack W
Like (3)
Version 05/27/2013
MisterE
13 May 2013
Just stopped by to poo on Norton haha, I really can't believe they still bother. Thanks for reminding me to update my ClamXav definitions :D
Like (7)
Version 05/02/2013
Jazzyguy
02 May 2013
They are the persona that manufactures the viruses for us to digest. They haven't gotten around to OSX yet as it is far better to infect Windows as that is where the real money is.
Like (3)
Version 05/02/2013
Foulger
25 December 2012
I have removed so many Norton anti virus apps from school computers that come pre installed with no viruses found. In many cases after installing ClamXav, several viruses have been found. I regard Norton as a virus in itself - it invades a hard drive with no good purpose.
Like (5)
Version 12/25/2012
BillyGoGo
23 November 2012
Hopefully all these antivirus companies will finally blow away with latest security measures of Mac OS X. Stop to sell your scareware! I believe most viruses are written by these companies themselves.
Like (2)
Version 11/19/2012
rames123
18 August 2012
The requested object does not exist on this server.
Like (1)
Version 08/14/2012
Fredash
07 November 2011
Useless on OS X.
Like (3)
Version 11/07/2011
RavenNevermore
11 July 2011
Mac viruses, what Mac viruses? :) I haven't needed it yet, but it updates fine and doesn't slow down my Mac. It has found PC viruses on flash drives from PC using friends, so it was kind of helpful to them.
Like (6)
Version 07/11/2011
1 answer(s)
Megavolt17
Megavolt17
07 March 2012
May not be many viruses, but some activity recently with Flashback (http://blog.intego.com/flashback-mac-malware-uses-twitter-as-command-and-control-center/ and http://blog.intego.com/new-flashback-variant-changes-tack-to-infect-macs/). These first used social engineering and wise users thought they would not be fooled into installing them. Then vulnerabilities in java (if not running the latest patched versions) were exploited to install the malware from an infected web page with no user intervention. Now if you have patched the java on your machine it will start Software Update to get you to type your admin password, which it then uses to install itself into Safari. None of these variations are technically viruses, but it's not like there is NOTHING out there to be cautious about.
Like (1)
@timi
20 June 2011
You know it's the antivirus companies that make viruses right?
Like (7)
Version 06/20/2011
1 answer(s)
iPoopStore
iPoopStore
27 September 2011
And we know you are very naive Baddington, B. I have a few bridges for sale if you are interested. I'd like to offload them before I start selling the ozone layer on ebay next. Those of us that have been around since the dawn of the computer age know full well AV companies are responsible for many generations of viruses to peddle their products with fear mongering. Many of these companies have been caught numerous times but the suckers keep on giving them money. Personally I wouldn't trust any product associated with the Norton franchise. After what what they did with Disk Doctor and many thousands of people lost their data to their shoddy tool I'd never use this product or any other even if it was given away. ClamAV is a good free tool if you really even need to care about winblows viruses being passed along accidentally. I couldn't care less if I did pass along any winblows viruses to my winblows clients. They gave it to me in the first place and they can have it back.
Like (4)
Wayne-Welsh
10 May 2011
All I get last night and this morning is: "Not Found". I even tried the Power Mac version and got the same thing.
Like
Version 05/07/2011
1 answer(s)
nobody2011
nobody2011
06 June 2011
3.5 star rating for nothing?! Or do you have rated the well weather?
Like (2)
MisterE
07 May 2011
Crapware. Can't think of a single positive.
Like (5)
Version 05/04/2011
3 answer(s)
Megavolt17
Megavolt17
13 June 2011
Have you tried version 11, and if so what problems did you have with it? "Crapware" is not very helpful...
Like (3)
Hkim
Hkim
15 October 2011
On mywot forums, many Windows users label Norton as "malware" due to fact they need a special de-installer to remove it and it slows down their machine. ClamAxv is a better way to detect windows virus, IMHO.
Like (1)
xXAkumuXx
xXAkumuXx
19 October 2011
That special "uninstaller" is made by Symantec to remove their own product. Be that as it may, Norton and McAfee are generally the firs two pieces of software I remove off a client's computer... even before the malware... that's about how useless Norton is. If Norton can't even do its job on Windows... then it certainly isn't helping Mac users.
Like (1)
Dvedmunds
01 March 2011
Uses to many resources, slows my iMac down and gets in the way. I have removed it from my 5740 iMac running Mac OS X 10.6.6. 2.93 GHz Intel Core i7. On the positive side Symantec refunded my money without question and was very understanding. I don't like to bag Symantec as I have used their products for years, but this version of Norton's was not up to scratch and unlike their other products. If Symantec fix Norton's I will purchase it again and give it another try.
Like (4)
Version 02/28/2011
Pony
25 January 2011
Argghhh. Annoyingly reports Windows viruses in Java caches as viruses even after Java cleared the cache. This results in an unhelpful alert that the file could not be cleaned.
Like (4)
Version 01/24/2011
Jazzyguy
10 January 2011
Who in his right mind put "PROCESS" down as an alternative to an Anti-Virus program??? How could this be related to viruses?
Like (4)
Version 01/10/2011
RavenNevermore
05 January 2011
Well I got this for free as part of the whole Norton Security package from Comcast/Xfinity. I haven't used any Norton products, or antivirus software for that matter, in a very long time (since the dawn of OS X). But I have been freelancing at Sony Music, and they use it, so I figured what the heck; I'll give it a whirl. So far it works fine. Just for fun I saved one of those zip attachments that I got on some junk mail that's supposed to be from UPS, and it detected the virus right away and removed it from the file. The only downside is if you have it regularly scanning you hard drive, the "Norton Missed Tasks" background app eats up CPU cycles, so I turned that feature off and only have it scan my downloads folder. I'm not expecting any viruses, but so far it has not messed up my Mac in the least. If I didn't know it was installed, I wouldn't know. It's very unobtrusive. @Wizard2; it's easy to uninstall, it didn't write files all over the place, and we aren't using PCs, so maybe you are thinking of Windoze?
Like (2)
Version 01/04/2011
3 answer(s)
MisterE
MisterE
07 May 2011
Never, ever install the software on the CD that comes from your ISP. Configure your connection manually and avoid the bloatware.
Like (3)
RavenNevermore
RavenNevermore
09 June 2011
@Mistere, I didn't install any software that came on a CD from my ISP. I also didn't have them set up my connection. I have a wireless network here with four Macs, some printers and so on. I do this for a living, so I know how to do it. :) What I said was Comcast offered this package, and since they were using it at Sony Music, I figured I'd give it a try. It works perfectly, and even helped my wife when she stumbled upon a fraudulent website when she was looking to order something.
Like (3)
MisterE
MisterE
09 June 2011
Right on David, thanks for reply. :)
Like (1)
mrsidoric
17 November 2010
Norton's AV products ARE a virus. Have you ever tried removing this stuff from a computer? It's a world of hurt -- miss just one of hundreds and hundreds of files and prefs it seeds throughout your harddrive -- and the bugger re-replicates itself. It's baaaack like a movie zombie. Most viruses and malware on Mac OS X require admin user approval before they install or active. The solution is simple - be vigilant and careful. NAV at best is an expensive, messy, buggy lesson. At worst, it will damage your PC.
Like (11)
Version 11/17/2010
3 answer(s)
Megavolt17
Megavolt17
27 November 2010
Really, you could not figure out how to remove it? There is a "Remove NAV" tool installed along with the program, and if you already removed that manually a quick search of their web site shows you can download the uninstaller at ftp://ftp.symantec.com/misc/tools/mactools/RemoveSymantecMacFiles.zip I had some trouble right after updating to Snow Leopard and I got an email reply, and a call back to assist me. They were professional and knowledgable. NAV did not waste a lot of system resources or give a lot of false positives.
Like (5)
Version 11/26/2010
paulsrandall
paulsrandall
04 January 2011
I agree with Megavolt17 and have nothing additional to add because Megavolt17 provided everything that I'd want to see concerning NAV. It is very easy to uninstall if you do not want it anymore.
Like (3)
iPoopStore
iPoopStore
27 September 2011
It's quite obvious Megavolt17 and Paulsrandall are as expert with software as my dog is uploading videos to YouTube. That so called uninstaller is passable but misses dozens of files you need to manually remove. Provided you even know where to look. Want proof? Use an Uninstaller tool to monitor the installer and then use the installer. Now count on all your fingers and toes or until you run out of digits how many files were left behind.
Like
Libertyforall1776
28 September 2010
Does this detect CPIV variants??
Like (1)
Version 09/28/2010
3 answer(s)
Libertyforall1776
Libertyforall1776
29 September 2010
CIPAV rather: http://news.cnet.com/8301-13578_3-10222294-38.html
Like
Version 09/28/2010
26cab40
26cab40
03 November 2010
Well, I come back to this package regularly and give it the rundown, as far as I can determine, it doesn't detect anything. But I live in hope..
Like (1)
Version 11/02/2010
RavenNevermore
RavenNevermore
09 June 2011
@26cab40, sure it does. But generally there's nothing to detect.
Like (1)
zo219
28 September 2010
Good ol' Norton. They never give up. Somebody must be buying this. New to Mac?
Like (5)
Version 09/27/2010
26cab40
18 August 2010
I tried the latest iteration of Norton on a few known problematic files. Small PC files loaded with Trojans/exploits etc. I normally use a dedicated PC with NOD32 to run all files through, especially those that might be passed to friends or colleagues. I also use Bitdefender Online for second pass and finally ClamXAV just to be complete. In a VMWare sandbox I have 10 files, all infected, that I keep as a test set, the oldest Trojan variant in there is 4 YEARS OLD !!! The most recent was sent to me last week. NOD32 picks up 9 out of ten but warns about the remaining file. Bitdefender Online picks up 8 out of the ten. Clam XAV also picks up 8 (surprising us all). Norton picks up 1. The 4 year old exploit. Norton also shows the highest CPU drain and consumes twice the memory of Bitdefender Online. In Bitdefenders defense it's already running in a rather bloated browser. It's awful, bloated, slow and has a bigger imprint than Sasquatch. Avoid this at all costs.
Like (8)
Version 08/18/2010
SickTeddyBear
08 June 2010
I use both ClamXav and Norton AntiVirus 11 for manual scanning under Leopard. I got NAV for free from my cable internet provider (it was part of Norton Internet Security 4). One thing I notice is that ClamXav seems to detect email viruses that NAV completely misses. Can someone clarify whether the signatures in NAV for Mac are OS X specific, and do not include Windows viruses? Do you need to purchase the "dual protection" version of NAV in order to get Windows virus signatures included in your scanning? Is it possible that ClamXav is giving me false positives, or have a missed a configuration setting for NAV?
Like (2)
Version 06/04/2010
Aargl
07 June 2010
Well... someday, some virus might destroy your Mac... ;-D When OSX appeared, there was that threat that with the expansion of Apple's market some nasty pirate would begin to make viruses and it would end just as it is for pc users... and it was nearly 10 years ago, now. So, it would be stupid to say "there will never be viruses on Mac!", but until now I've never got one and never heard of anyone getting one. The main risk might be running pc apps on your Mac, but except for that, the risk is so tiny that I continue sleeping without any antivirus, and I'm sleeping well... ;-) (to me, the most terrible viruses in Macs are all those damned pc parts they put in since old powerpc days, beginning with IDE instead of SCSI, that made Macs cheaper but weaker :-(
Like (3)
Version 06/04/2010
2 answer(s)
Macmend-com
Macmend-com
02 August 2010
They are there, when the last version of iWork came out it was heavily pirated and many of these pirated disk image copies carried a mac trojan.
Like
Version 08/02/2010
Studiodave56
Studiodave56
23 August 2010
A Trojan is not a virus, it is a program that you must run. A virus is a program that can infect and run without your help.
Like
Version 08/23/2010
Der~bot~haus
12 May 2010
145MB?
Like (4)
Version 05/11/2010
1 answer(s)
Gobra
Gobra
19 July 2010
Yeah, they are fighting thousands phantom viruses on Mac, definitely need 145mb on your hard drive!
Like (3)
Version 07/19/2010
Eff
25 September 2009
Simply because you've never encountered one, doesn't mean they didn't exist. I caught one back in days of my trusty ole' SE30 while installing a game from a floppy I had purchased at a local book store. Luckily, it was a variant of Code 252 which just displayed a creepy message and then deleted itself. And if you don't believe the page I linked to above, take it from the horse's mouth: http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=50569 http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=30345 (under "MBDF virus and Mac OS 8") So yes, you are correct in that there are currently no viruses for any version of OS X, and with very few exceptions OS X users don't need to be concerned about the issue (I don't have AV software installed on any of Macs, btw), aside from exercising common sense when surfing/downloading files. But that does not mean that a) there never were any viruses on the Mac platform in the past, and b) there may not be poo-ware attacking OS X in the future. All that being said, I think we can agree on two points: Norton AV, in its current state, is a POS, and the AV developer's money-grabbing schemes are ridiculous.
Like (3)
Version 9/24/09
2 answer(s)
Eff
Eff
25 September 2009
Aw crap, the above was in reply to FRANKHOGG's second comment. An edit/delete button for one's own comments would go a long way here ...
Like (3)
Version 9/24/09
Canadianpj
Canadianpj
28 December 2009
I agree that Apple users should be much more aware of coming viruses to the platform. Apple marketshare is rising which means the viruses are going to be coming along sooner or later. What I would not recommend is installing his bloatware. I gave up on Norton on the PC a long time ago. There are other alternatives for the Mac which are just as effective and far less bloat.
Like (5)
Version 12/25/09
Ilgaz
06 September 2009
If this release included "signature updates for the unpatched java security hole on pre OS X 10.5 systems" as release note, I would run to Symantec store and buy it. Of course, they are so busy with including Windows virus signatures and proof of concept junk rather than real threats, backdoors. I don't want to spam this site so consider this comment for every single AV running under OS X, even including "free" ones. If you aren't protecting against an active threat, you don't deserve a single CPU cycle.
Like (1)
Version 9/4/09
alas!
02 September 2009
Norton antivirus? The mere mention of that name should give any self respecting Mac user a case of spontaneous, explosive diarrhea. Truthfully, as has oft been said, there just ain't no active virus threat out there in the wild for Macs at the moment. One of these days, there likely will be. So, it might be wise to have some anti virus protection at one's disposal. There is, though, no reason to pay through the nose for some virus protection such as the dreaded and sickening Norton or the quite overpriced Intego VirusBarrier (they've got a $30 yearly fee for virus definition updates after one's first year of Virusbarrier use). There's the highly regarded and free ClamX.
Like (10)
Version 9/1/09
1 answer(s)
Igreg
Igreg
19 September 2009
The new iAntiVirus by PC Tools works nicely with background scanning (and no apparent slowing of the system), easy interface, fast updates and there is a free version. The weaknesses of ClamX AV are its fairly complex interface, weakness in providing much automatic protection. Although ClamX AV is also free. I have always used an antivirus, not because it is really needed at this time, but to be familiar & comfortable using an antivirus if & when it is really needed. Norton AV and Intego AV are both good, and while the purchase prices are not too bad, the annual virus definitions subscriptions are way too expensive.
Like
Version 9/18/09
Frankhogg
19 August 2009
I've been using Macs since 1984 and I don't use any "AntiVirus" software, free or paid for simply because THERE ARE NO VIRUSES FOR A MAC! Never have been. I've never had a problem... NEVER! Do you know why there are two lion statues in front of the NY Public Library? The answer is they keep the elephants away. Hey it works just as well as any anti virus software for the Mac does.
Like (5)
Version 8/18/09
2 answer(s)
Eff
Eff
25 September 2009
Normally, I wouldn't have replied to a comment like this but since you're boasting about your historical knowledge of the Mac (since 1984, no less!!) ... yes, THERE HAVE BEEN viruses specifically targeting Mac OS (Classic) *prior* to OS X. It wasn't even a fraction of the poo-ware targeting Windows back then but it existed nonetheless. Kindly point your browser to: "http://bit.ly/macviruses", scroll to "7.0 What viruses can affect Mac users?", read, and in the future please refrain from spreading false statements disguised as historical knowledge. Now, there's nothing wrong with not knowing everything (noone does, except for Stephen Fry), but there's everything wrong WITH SHOUTING falsehoods disguised as facts.
Like
Version 9/24/09
Frankhogg
Frankhogg
25 September 2009
As you said the document you referred us to dates to January of 2000 and deals with Classic, not OSX. I do not, nor can I, attest to the veracity of that 9+ year old web page. But I will restate that I have never had a virus since starting to use Macs in 1984. Even Leo Laporte agrees with me but clarifies it by stating that there has never been a virus "in the wild" for Macs. Proof of concept perhaps but nothing that would support wasting money, time and system resources on virus software. When and if it becomes a problem then I will address it, not before. Google, "leo laporte mac virus" for more info. I don't know who you are but most techies know who Leo Laporte is. I feel that I am in good company and stand by my original statement. You can Google my name too and you'll see I've been around a good long while. As far as I'm concerned you can use anti virus software, wear tin foil hats whatever floats your boat. But in my many years of experience using and servicing Macs I have never had a virus, trojan horse etc. problem. Take that for what it's worth.
Like (2)
Version 9/24/09
arinsblogcdyt
08 August 2009
Just another happy user of ClamAV. I would say that unless you really hate your machine, stay away from the bloated NAV. I have had enough of it. Can you imagine I discarded it even after buying it for a decent amount! That is because I love my computer just too much to torture it with Norton. Ever since I installed Clam, my machine has become much faster and on top of that, it is yet to get affected with a virus or trojan! I also have a machine that runs on Windows XP and I use the free Avira on that one!
Like (7)
Version 8/07/09
shawnabecklar
05 August 2009
Been looking for this update. So this makes it easy. thanks guys
Like (1)
Version 8/04/09
Scott-e-collins
16 July 2009
Norton Antivirus feels somewhat to 'bloated' for me. I personally prefer ClamAVX. Also heard good things about McAfee, but ClamAVX seems to have the most clean, no-nonsense 'feel' to it.
Like (6)
Version 7/15/09
Rmendes
15 July 2009
with all the updates this is getting, it must include the h1n1 anti-virus as well...
Like (3)
Version 7/14/09
26cab40
15 July 2009
This udpate is very poor. It does not improve Norton, an already poor application. I suggest ClamXAV as a better alternative.
Like (7)
Version 7/14/09
1 answer(s)
carmen539tu
carmen539tu
05 August 2009
Hi, Totally agree with you on the Norton part. It used to slow down my machine to a snail's speed! I even tried their latest 2009 version and although this new version does not hog as much RAM as its predecessors, it is still a nuisance as always. I finally dumped it for good and now use ClamAV and am pretty happy with it!
Like (3)
Version 8/04/09
Mark-Everitt
15 July 2009
Is all discussion post-2006 simply being deleted? I know it's been heated lately but some good points were made. These virus definitions can only be used with the non-free Norton AntiVirus. I'd say that this does not fit into any meaningful definition of free. Secondly, these definitions seem to be supplied separately because the automatic updating in NAV does not function under 10.5.7 (looking at the comments for NAV). Considering that Symantec deals by keeping us scared of our own shadows I'm going to be consistent to that and put it to them that using a separate installer to update definitions is an enormous gap in their protection. If automatic updating does work, then posting the definitions here is shameless (and frankly bewildering) advertising. This is a shocking state of affairs. For the record I run ClamAV, not because I fear viruses but because I work with some windows users. If they get a virus then it slows me down too (I've tried to convert them to Mac or Linux to little avail). The main free competitor to Norton on a mac is ClamXav, which has no problem with updating itself.
Like (4)
Version 7/14/09
2 answer(s)
Springheelmac
Springheelmac
17 July 2009
I can assure you that the auto update problem under 10.5.7 has been fixed. I had encountered it as well. Also, NAV was not even RUNNING under 10.5.7 for a few weeks after it came out. But I noticed it has been auto updating AND scanning successfully for a few weeks now. The fix was delivered via an update, so if you have the problem, hit "Update everything now" on your LiveUpdate app and make sure you install everything.
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Version 7/17/09
Mark-Everitt
Mark-Everitt
17 July 2009
Thank you for your reply SpringheelMac. I don't use NAV however. I was just raising some questions. Unfortunately many of my comments have been removed lately so my position may have been confusing. At least these updates are now filed under 'update' rather than 'free'. I am pragmatic when it comes to antivirus software though. As I work with so many windows users, if they get a virus it has a knock on effect on me. I'm in no real danger myself though, so I see no reason to pay for NAV, which is notoriously difficult to remove. It's still in my best interests to screen email for windows viruses, so I use ClamAV.
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Version 7/17/09
Micky1
19 May 2006
http://www.macupdate.com/info.php/id/15850
Like (1)
Version 5/18/06
1 answer(s)
D9
D9
13 July 2006
ClamXAV seems pretty sweet and simple to setup. I guess the proof is in the pudding to see if it both catches potential viruses as well as avoids cramping the system in doing so. Any info on whether this scans for PC viruses, too? This is important for those of us working in mixed environments where are Macs at the least may be transporters for those bugs.
Like (2)
Version 7/12/06
Anonymous
03 November 2005
Does anybody comment on NAV that doesn't hate it for whatever reason? As a U.S. Department of Defense member, I have access to the DOD agency licensed (regular corporate) level product, which is free for anyone connected with the DOD, even contractors. I run NAV9 on my three personal Macs at home (OSX 10.4.2 and 10.4.3 until I get them all updated) and have for years. We also run them on all our Macs at work. In all cases, we do it not only because DOD policy madates using AV software (and provides your choice of several products), but because it's only polite to the poor Windows users we all interface with so we aren't virus vectors to them. I've never had a problem with NAV loading, setting up properly, or running as expected--on any of many systems from OSX 10.1x onward. If there's a problem with the personal edition, Norton needs to fix that. But it is NOT a universal problem, and may also be an issue with a misconfiguration on a particular Mac or due to not verifying and repairing permissions often enough, too.
Like (2)
Version 11/02/05
2 answer(s)
Mechamania
Mechamania
09 June 2006
If Windows users need the protection, then they can buy me the software and install and maintain it. Better yet, they can get a Mac.
Like (4)
Version 6/8/06
Bubi
Bubi
20 September 2008
I don't see the point. if the dod thinks you need an antivirus for a mac then god save america!!!! Had a mac since 1994 and yet to see one!! what a joke!
Like (5)
Version 09/18/08
Anonymous
20 October 2005
Uh, please Mac users. Acknowledge that Norton 'Anything' is detrimental to the 'X' system. Yes, in the old days of MacOS9, but no more. A warning to newbies: Don't even try it!
Like (1)
Version 10/19/05
Anonymous
22 September 2005
NAV itself has resulted in far greater risk and instability of the computers I oversee than any OSX virus. Their scare tactics issued earlier this week were a sad attempt to sell more software and updates. SHAME ON SYMANTIC for their cheap publicity stunt. If you want a challenge -- try removing NAV sometime and see what happens. Its UGLY and causes untold hardship. All good reasons to NUKE NAV. The computer you save may be your own.
Like (2)
Version 9/22/05
Sebriel /X\
22 September 2005
Completely Useless I have been using Apple Computers since 1990, all the time downloading , searching in the internet, and i have never had a virus.....
Like (3)
Version 9/22/05