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Ulysses Reviews

17.1
28 August 2019

Your one-stop writing environment.

wRkA
11 August 2017

Most helpful

¿Another app with subscription model? To the trash... At this rate this will be a painful for many people.
Like (17)
Version 11

Read 140 Ulysses User Reviews

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Svenster
28 August 2019
I too bought Ulysses before it became proscribed and was very disappointed as I had just paid large amounts for it. So I stopped using it for over a year. The next time I looked at it the subscription prices appeared to have become more realistic and the feature set begun t improve significantly so I reluctantly resubscribed to find that the feature set had significantly improved and in a direction I found to be appropriate for my needs. Since then Ulysses has continued to add functions and respond to its user base and kept the price somewhat realistic.
Like
Version 17.1
Appleday88
20 August 2019
NEIN zu Software-Abos!
NO to software subscriptions!!!!!!!
Like
Version 17
Macintosh-Sauce
28 May 2019
I was going to have a look at the new version, but when I read that it was now a subscription product - NO THANKS! I am divesting myself of all subscription products on my Mac. Going to check out Scrivener instead, because I'm writing a book at the moment and so is my wife. e.g. Instead of using Microsoft Office 365 I now use LibreOffice - free to use and I'm even going to donate something to them because the suite of programs is really great and available on macOS, Windows, Linux. I saved myself $99/year.
Like (3)
Version 16
Gazman
29 September 2018
Great despite misgivings about subscription. I'd owned the previous two versions of Ulysses (that didn't require a subscription) and when the new version came out, I just stuck with the previous version because it still worked well. However, I've now upgraded to the new, subscription model (I get a lifetime discount due to purchasing the previous versions) and I've got to say I just feel at home writing in Ulysses. I have a number of other writing apps, however, I feel Ulysses nails that sweet spot between features and ease of use. I love writing in it, so much so that I've now deleted the other writing apps from my MacBook because I find myself doing all my writing in Ulysses.
Like
Version 14.2
KenGetz
29 July 2018
Love the app. Using the Setapp version now.
Like
Version 13.2
nobody2011
19 June 2018
Contains free 14-day trial on all devices.
Like (1)
Version 13.1
Maclover1-1
16 June 2018
Subscription for text files, no thanks.
Like (8)
Version 13
LuxLogica
30 May 2018
It is in fact subscription-ware, which is FALSELY ADVERTISED here as "free". It is a note-taking app - think 'Evernote' - not a "writing project management tool" - like the far superior Scrivener (although it bills itself as one). As a note-taking app, it stores every single piece of text you write - for every project and client - and puts it into one single 'database' - a nightmare, if you have to juggle multiple writing projects with widely varying content and styles. Exporting all this data, properly separated into individual projects, to other apps is a bit of a chore.. It uses a proprietary file format, lacks the research management and the export tools that the competitors have. With many freeware and cheaper (buy-once) markdown editors around - see LightPaper - it's a wonder that this has lasted as long as it has.
Like (7)
Version 13
1 answer(s)
Funjoy
Funjoy
30 May 2018
Devs are not 'advertising' it here. Macupdate lists all freely downloadable apps as free.

App also does *not* put everything into a single database... unless you want that. But you can easily add external files (on Mac Dropbox, whatever) if you want.
Like
sbenitezb
11 April 2018
What's wrong with developers these days? They all want to charge a suscription for a piece of software. It's not a service like Netflix, so I don't see why they expect people to keep paying... Thankfully there exists Scrivener, which is much better and complete.
Like (6)
Version 12.3
aaffonso
19 March 2018
Big NO. Try Scrivener or Quiver instead.
Like (6)
Version 12.3
aljaruun
20 February 2018
Greedy devs. 14-day trial, subscription s/w, poor customer service, too. Scrivener is a MUCH better tool, cheaper and better customer service.
Like (9)
Version 12.3
Teksestro
16 January 2018
@MacUpdate Admins: this is NOT a free app. The app has a 14-day trial period, then switches on to subscription-ware - $40/year. It is misleading for it to be listed here as 'free'.
Like (6)
Version 12.3
szeoli-1
31 December 2017
Not happy with the team that develops Ulysses. It's a great writing app, no question. But I paid out over $100 for 1. Ulysses II, 2. Daedalus, 3. Ulysses III, 4. iPad version of Ulysses. Then I learn that's not enough for them. They now want me to give them money every year. Even then they mislead me into believing existing users would get a 50% discount, when the actual discount was 25%. And I'm supposed to have faith they'll keep robustly developing the app? Sorry, no.
Like (6)
Version 12.2
Gazman
22 December 2017
$40 per year when Scrivener is $45 for a one-off purchase? Tell him he’s dreaming! (from my favourite Aussie movie, The Castle). The version of Ulysses I actually bought (it got to version 2.8.3) still works perfectly well despite not having been updated since they introduced version 12 (how’s that for skipping a few version numbers) and the subscription model.
Like (4)
Version 12.2
ysgad
25 November 2017
An other subscription model (and expensive at that) when there are so many other free alternatives or programs that do much more and much better with standard markdown or other known flavours. Scrivener and any markdown-specific text editor out there will do what Ulysses can do and better.
Like (3)
Version 12.1
jennymarieholmes
07 November 2017
Nice little app for what it is but what it is...is very basic. It seems to be part of this new trend for minimal distraction free writing which I assume is its USP but really all that means in this case and many others is "lack of features". That said, what it does it does quite well and if you are looking for a minimal app to collate your thoughts then it's worth a try. Good that you can include images too and handy to be able to sync between devices. Not too keen on the whole subscription model but hey, seems to be another growing trend with publishers...
Like
Version 12.1
Wonderwarthog
24 October 2017
…aaand they went to subscription. Ditched.

- Ditched Adobe
- Ditched Sketch
- Ditched Ulysses

It's a glorified Markdown writer, just put your .md files in folders on iCloud drive and use whatever you want. I personally like Typora.io which is free (during the beta) or Byword, which is decently priced and works well. There's also Writeapp.
Like (4)
Version 12.1
Woodjoe
18 October 2017
And the next update just to erase user ratings...
Like (5)
Version 12.1
Woodjoe
14 October 2017
Ulysses makes small updates every couple of days to circumvent the voting systems here and in the app store. This just says so much about their policy. I bought the app one year ago and paid 60 Euros for it. Then I bought the iPhone app and paid premium again. Now they want us to shell out that amount of money every year. For a simple text editor.
Like (6)
Version 12
Woodjoe
24 September 2017
I recently bought Ulysses and paid the full price, some weeks later they changed their pricing model and switched to subscriptions... Why does a simple writing tool like Ulysses that updates twice a year need subscriptions? They even didn't add any features with their change, the new app is the same as the old one...
Like (5)
Version 11.4
Penpoints
13 September 2017
Nice app, but I stopped using it. Will not switch to *yet another* subscription for software. Better to trash it and move on.
Like (3)
Version 11.4
Derekcurrie
29 August 2017
NOT free. "Ulysses requires a subscription, which will unlock the app on all devices (Mac, iPhone and iPad). The apps can be downloaded for free on the Mac App Store and the App Store, respectively.... Contains a 14-day trial on all devices." https://ulyssesapp.com/pricing/ USA: $5/mth or $40/year I for one don't deal with subscriptions for software. When you stop paying, the app is worthless and its proprietary format files are worthless. :-(
Like (8)
Version 11.2
2 answer(s)
Wonderwarthog
Wonderwarthog
24 October 2017
Its "proprietary" format files are markdown files. That is plain text. Any markdown writer or text editor can open them, I presume? Still I won't buy any subscription based software myself either.
Like
ysgad
ysgad
25 November 2017
When you write "its proprietary format files" I am assuming you are referring to the Markdown XL format? You can change that in the preferences. But I agree, the change to the subscription model, at that price, is not working for me either. Leaving it behind.
Like
Funjoy
16 August 2017
I had an old version of Ulysses I wasn't using and decided to try out the Mac/iOS combo with the new subscription pricing. I have been using IA Writer for iOS/Mac and BBedit on the Mac too. Before that I was using Byword on iOS/Mac (with BBedit). After a few days of hard use I'm coming to like it a lot. A lot of power married to ease of use. Coming from the 'do it our way' design of IA Writer I'm really enjoying the user theme exchange and easy theme creation for colors, fonts, background etc. Not positive I won't drop the subscription and go back to my other tools, but so far I'm enjoying the app and the cross-platform experience. I understand that many people dislike subscriptions but my experience is that when devs have a stable, foreseeable cash flow situation they are better able to more quickly implement updates and features, and being able to being everyone into the latest version makes support easier too. I subscribe to excellent, well-supported apps (Lightroom, 1Password, Anylist) and if Ulysses is able to offer the same levels of support and development I can see sticking with it.
Like (1)
Version 11.1
5 answer(s)
wRkA
wRkA
16 August 2017
- This is not cross-platform
- Is ecosystem

Monthly bills:
- Water
- Energy
- Internet
- Rent
- Cell phone
- 1Password
- Ulysses
- Lightroom
- more...
Like (3)
ysgad
ysgad
18 August 2017
You write: "foreseeable cash flow situation they are better able to more quickly implement updates and features"
My question: Why? How does that work?
IMO, a steady revenue results in less incentive to come-up with good features (and quickly) to get the customers to upgrade. I support Caberlin's view (below) and the one I expressed earlier. This may be a sign that things will start to slow down. It is what it is. If that is the case, I will work with the alternatives (and there are quite a few) very happily.
Like (1)
Funjoy
Funjoy
19 August 2017
"My question: Why? How does that work?
IMO, a steady revenue results in less incentive"

No. A steadier, less volatile income stream lets it plan projects and updates and hiring while having a good idea of what it can budget based on those income streams. They can fund more r&d with a predictable and constant revenue stream. You see this with companies from Avid to Adobe. It really works.

And users get MORE updates, since devs aren't holding off features for the next X.0 version upgrade iteration to entice upgraders.

And by rolling out updates to users automatically and adding support for new standards and features outside of the confines of a standard product cycle (instead of specific, halting upgrades) they'll know they're bringing all their users with them, which reduces support costs for users with old versions.
Like (1)
ysgad
ysgad
22 August 2017
I see your point, but the reality is this: Not at the fee they want. There are way too many alternatives, some free, to make their new subscription model work. I am out, and from what I read here and elsewhere (and also because of their cranky replies), I am not the only one.
Like (1)
Funjoy
Funjoy
24 August 2017
That's fine with me. But I was just addressing the flawed contention that development would slow with the introduction of stable income from subscriptions. The history of successful subscription apps just does not bear that out, and I explained why. If you don't like the pricing that's fine

For me, considering that the Mac version (which I didn't own) used to cost $45 (plus any subsequent upgrades) and I didn't even own a current version of the iOS app, it seemed worth it *to me* to spend $30/year for cross-platform iOS/Mac apps that work well together now.

So far I still miss IA Writer's embedded licensed Nitti font, but I'm making do on Ulysses, where there are more and more powerful features I'm getting into. (For example, the themes are wonderful; IA Writer purposefully restricts you from using anything except their 2 theme choices, plain and dark, but I'm happier with more choices.)

Again, if BBedit had a couple more features like Focus mode, I'd probably still primarily be using it. I've used that app for 20 years and love it to death, but its design choices are not first and foremost for writers of words, and in comparison to the competition in 2017 it shows.
Like
ysgad
16 August 2017
No thanks for the subscription model. Moving everything to Scrivener, or TextNut, or ByWord or iA Writer, I am not sure yet, but this is not a good sign. When a product is running out of expansion potential this happens, and with that comes less incentive from the developer to come-up with innovations. I am done, already spent way too much on the mobile app just a few months ago. Cutting my losses.
Like (4)
Version 11.1
aaffonso
15 August 2017
They move to subscription model offering no new feature, being available in a single ecosystem (no windows or android apps) and with a history of updates only during new OS releases for compatibility issues. $200 each 5-year cycle for a beautiful word processing seems a lot.
Like (4)
Version 11.1
Caberlin
13 August 2017
Subscription? - That normally means in my experience that a product is at the end of a live cycle where not much new can be expected but you continue paying. No thanks. I might be continuing using the previous version as long as at it works and begin looking for alternatives.
Like (7)
Version 11.1
andrew-long
13 August 2017
NOT FREE! 14 day trial...
Like (7)
Version 11
AnnL7456
12 August 2017
This is not a free version, as MacUpdate states. Instead this is a new subscription model which for me equals to: 'goodbye' Ulysses.

I think Ulysses is best for short and unstructured text, like newspaper and web articles, and blogging. Many diehard Ulysses-users are bloggers.
I pasted a long and heavily formatted dissertation into Ulysses to see how easy it would be to break it down into small chunks in Ulysses. The Headers remained intact, but all the formatting was lost, which is ok, but I think it would take a long time to create sheets for each chapter and section, and markup tags would have to be inserted from scratch manually one by one, which could be very tedious. I don't think, for example, that there's a way to automatically select all Headings 4 and change them to, let's say, Headings 2. Correct me if I'm wrong.
In other words, before formatted documents are imported, it's best to use tools like Nisus Writer Pro to quickly change the formatting and insert markup tags instead. In Nisus this doesn't take more than a second or two, and can be fully automated.
Apart from the Goal-setting feature, which is really good, I can't think of anything that Nisus doesn't allow you to do much better. In Nisus you can instantly create markup tags. I even tweaked the interface and the styles to give me a certain Ulysses feeling in Nisus. If you assign Heading 7 to the "Normal" style in Nisus, all your text will be accessible in Nisus' Navigator, from where you can instantly restructure the whole document by dragging portions of the text up and down in the Navigator, like you can do with sheets in Ulysses.
Ulysses also can't assign language property to text (like Nisus can do.) Therefore there's no way, for example, to find all French words and phrases in your document.
Ulysses doesn't have tables, does it? I searched for the word "table" in the introduction and found "comforTABLE", which then reminded me that you can only search for strings, not words. Enough said.

Based on the following criteria, I give Ulysses 2.5 stars.
[1] Not so good, [2] OK, [3] Good, [4] Very good, [5] Exceptional
Like (7)
Version 11
Sonnendeck
11 August 2017
Subscription? Forget it!!
Like (10)
Version 11
wRkA
11 August 2017
¿Another app with subscription model? To the trash... At this rate this will be a painful for many people.
Like (17)
Version 11
3 answer(s)
xcoxco
xcoxco
11 August 2017
Must agree. As apps move to the subscription model users' annual out of pocket expenses can skyrocket. I have many apps that I use little. But because they cost little I buy them. The subscription model potentially forces one to greatly reduce app purchases. Those apps that one uses only occasionally are often no longer affordable under the subscriber model - higher costs over a 2-3 year period. I do wonder whether the subscription model will in the end benefit or hurt the smaller developers. Depends on the pricing. Time will tell.
Like (4)
Gazman
Gazman
14 October 2017
For me it's not the subscription model per se, I'm happy enough to pay a reasonable price for a subscription. But, for me, there's no way that Ulysses is worth $55 a year (I'm Australian, its $40US per yer). Not when Scrivener is $45US for a one off purchase.
Like (1)
Raddle
Raddle
10 October 2018
Non-review. If you don't like a subscription model that's fine (I don't either, but you try running a small business dependent on cashflow without one) but don't review the *software* purely on the basis of how you *pay for it*.
Like
Jimk
11 August 2017
Five stars for the app, four stars removed for the surprise licensing change (which I found out about from 9to5 Mac, and not from the Soulmen themselves). It is a good app, but the subscription model is not justified for a text editor.
Like (9)
Version 11
Ptk3
11 May 2017
I just spent two months with Ulysses writing a chapter for a collective book; the tool is great; very hepful in focusing on your writing and managing notes from lot of sources. Just near perfect to manage markdown markup. Interface is good, really good (a thought for the really beautiful interface of Write, which its dev nearly abandoned), and the ability to merge two files seems to be great (I've not tested it this time… it feels risky for a production work, but I ahve to try it on some drafts). There's just two or three features I'd like to see implemented to make it the best tool for writing in markdown AND long texts: 1) folding text (really, really needed), as it becomes really annoying to scroll in a text of 20 pages or more, 2) export better, of course for Word (as we have lots of collegues, editors, and other peopla around in our profesionnal world who work with that… soft): converting to word means converting all the markdown, footnote, table, img… 3) synchronisation between the macOS and the iOS version works good, but not very good (folders seems to take more time than files to be sync when you change their name or replace them). Finally the learning curve is not so trivial; it could be good to add in-app tutorial when it csynchronisation between the macOS and the iOS version works good, but not very good (folders seems to take more time than files to be sync when you change their name or replace them).omes to learn some hidden features (I spend time in the menu items, and more times in the Help). It's a beautiful peace of software, and I really thank the Soulmen for maling it possible… Go on bro' !
Like (1)
Version 2.8.2
Teksestro
08 April 2017
This is not a serious writing tool - it's a glorified note-taking app. Commercial writers tend to work in multiple projects, for multiple clients. We need DOCUMENTS. Shoving all my writing into one big database is a joke. Unless the developers can make this fundamental change to the app, nothing else matters.
Like (6)
Version 2.8.1
2 answer(s)
Ptk3
Ptk3
11 May 2017
Don't really understand what you miss : you can save docs in any folders you want, and see your docs into this folder??
Like (2)
Szeoli
Szeoli
12 July 2017
Funny, I've written a 60,000 word book in Ulysses. Didn't miss DOCUMENTS once. It's a breeze exporting to a number of different file formats.
Like
nautisx
22 February 2017
I really like this approach to writing. It allows me to chunk sections. I got well into a new project when I discovered that the tool does not have the ability to create tables. I do a lot of technical writing and tables are essential. For regular prose, this is a great tool but without tables, this is not very useful for me.
Like
Version 2.7.2
carthage
10 September 2016
Probably the worst tool for writing I've ever come across. I fail to see what the developers thought they were offering that wasn't already provided in LibreOffice for free or Scrivener if you want to go paid. Candy-floss graphics for writer...have some respect. It's tools, and most importantly longevity that we need. I'm not locking my data up into this proprietary s/w (note how Scrivener saves everything in RTF).
Like (2)
Version 2.6
1 answer(s)
ysgad
ysgad
06 April 2017
O.k., although please not that RTF **IS** proprietary (Microsoft)... Therefore, despite the fact that Scrivener and Nisus Writer Pro use .rtf, the "longevity" of such a file format is not guaranteed. Plain text is though, and that is why all these writing apps use plain text and markdown for formatting. You clearly don't get the point of Ulysses (and I am assuming, you don't get the idea behind ByWord, IA Writer, Typora, Texts, etc. either.
Like (2)
putitoverhere
22 April 2016
OK. I'm coming straight at it. Ulysses just could be the most elegant, well-planned and best-realized way to write electronically to date. I want so much to buy it and live in it. HOWEVER (you notice that’s a big “however…”), I just can't get comfortable with a proprietary file mechanism that does not provide for an organized, predictable export of -- at least -- textual content. I can't seem to get over the feeling that The Soulmen want serve as my publisher and literary agent, with sole rights in perpetuity to my intellectual property — that I will never be allowed to get away from my “contract” with them. PLEASE — somebody tell me I'm wrong and why. I'll then gladly drink the kool-aid, straight, no chaser.
Like (6)
Version 2.5.2
1 answer(s)
ysgad
ysgad
06 April 2017
Feels to me like you don't understand Ulysses. Proprietary? What is locking you in anything proprietary in Ulysses exactly? The "convert markup" or export tools don't work for you in getting text files (plain text), html, PDF, EPUB or docx?
Like (2)
Teksestro
13 March 2016
Any 'serious' writing app has to provide support for DOCUMENTS. Saving everything you write into a single database might be useful for note-taking and scrapbook-style apps like Evernote, but not for a professional writing tool. I don't want to see every note of every project I've ever written for in a gigantic database. I don't want to have to filter through dozens of projects, to find the current files for the project I want to work on. The "all your writing in one place" approach is a major fail - no matter how nice the program's interface might be.
Like (11)
Version 2.5
Gazman
14 December 2015
Ulysses is a great app for writing longer projects - not as bloated or cumbersome as Scrivener, more utilitarian than ByWord or it's ilk. The main reason I find it hard to stick with Ulysses (and all the other Markdown editors out there) is it's insistence on displaying what you write in syntax rather than WYSIWYG. When I'm writing longer pieces I don't want my writing muddled with all the asterisks and other syntax, yet Ulysses forces me to have it. The no longer developed Write has the best implementation of what I'm after, there it's called 'Rich MD', and other apps such as Typora which feature WYSIWYG markdown don't offer typewriter scrolling, which I consider an essential feature of a serious writing program. So, the search continues ...
Like (2)
Version 2.2.1
1 answer(s)
Uncoy
Uncoy
10 February 2017
I wanted to recommend Typora to you but you'd already been there. I find iA Writer night mode with typewriter mode very zen when working. Still Markdown there, though you can proof in the WYSIWYG side (I prefer seeing markup and preview at same time).
Like
LuxLogica
02 November 2015
After reading several reviews online comparing Ulysses to Scrivener, I was eager to try it out. Now that a *lot* of my writing is done for online consumption, and therefore is done in Markdown, Scrivener is coming up short. I *really* wanted to find a serious writing project management software that could handle Markdown and somewhat rival the comprehensiveness of Scrivener. Unfortunately, Ulysses is certainly not 'it'. Ulysses' interface is arguably the best thing about the program - modern, clean, sleek, you can tell a great deal of thought went into it - and it does make using the program's features rather intuitive. But unfortunately, that seems to be it's only point of difference. Ulysses does sport some nice 'advanced' features, not commonly found in they myriad of Markdown editors available for the Mac these days - such as having a word count target. But these features are common to most word-processing and serious writing tools. But more disappointingly, it has some very severe shortcomings - at least for my use-case. It does not preview images in-line. It does not even allow you to select images using OS X's photo browser. Its support of Markdown is patchy - it uses its own 'version' of Markdown, which is not supported by any other software, so expect import issues if transferring your work. But most disappointing of all is to see that the developers have chosen to build the program as a snippet utility: Ulysses stores ALL of your documents produced in it within a SINGLE library, which it manages. Like other programs - TextNut, etc. - you can open an external folder inside the program's window, but features will be missing, as this is not how the program is made to be used. This is touted by the developer as a 'feature', but it is the most glaring indication that it is a note-taking application, rather than a serious writing tool. I deal with a multitude of different writing projects - from social media posts, through newsletter articles, to technical courses - and the *last* thing I want is to have all the texts from all my different clients and projects mixed into one big pile. Ulysses does have several filtering functions, that allow you to categorise and restrict the view of your documents, but that is basically forcing the user to jump through hoops to get the program to behave as if it were a document-based application (which it isn't). That "feature" alone means it's quite useless to me. I'm sadly disappointed at not being able to find a use for Ulysses in my writing toolbox. It does not have enough features to replace Scrivener as a writing-project manager, is not Markdown-compatible enough to replace a dedicated editor, and in the note-taking space there are more attractive and cheaper apps (with better Markdown support) - such as Write and TextNut. I hope the developers will decide which direction they wish to take the software, and invest on fine-tuning its features to suit that market, just as they fine-tuned its beautiful interface.
Like (13)
Version 2.2.1
1 answer(s)
putitoverhere
putitoverhere
04 April 2016
A true writer speaks here. He/she even knows to use "eager" instead of "anxious!" ;-) A 500 word review, containing the most comprehensive list of just why Ulysses is simply "not soup yet" and why we all wish it could become more. The Ulysses interface is as close as it gets to the dream place to write, but the app retains simply too much control of the "non-documents."

Thanks LuxLogica for articulating the flaws in Ulysses so clearly.
Like (3)
LuxLogica
02 November 2015
After reading several reviews online comparing Ulysses to Scrivener, I was eager to try it out. Now that a *lot* of my writing is done for online consumption, and therefore is done in Markdown, Scrivener is coming up short. I *really* wanted to find a serious writing project management software that could handle Markdown and somewhat rival the comprehensiveness of Scrivener. Unfortunately, Ulysses is certainly not 'it'. Ulysses' interface is arguably the best thing about the program - modern, clean, sleek, you can tell a great deal of thought went into it - and it does make using the program's features rather intuitive. But unfortunately, that seems to be it's only point of difference. Ulysses does sport some nice 'advanced' features, not commonly found in they myriad of Markdown editors available for the Mac these days - such as having a word count target. But these features are common to most word-processing and serious writing tools. But more disappointingly, it has some very severe shortcomings - at least for my use-case. It does not preview images in-line. It does not even allow you to select images using OS X's photo browser. Its support of Markdown is patchy - it uses its own 'version' of Markdown, which is not supported by any other software, so expect import issues if transferring your work. But most disappointing of all is to see that the developers have chosen to build the program as a snippet utility: Ulysses stores ALL of your documents produced in it within a SINGLE library, which it manages. Like other programs - TextNut, etc. - you can open an external folder inside the program's window, but features will be missing, as this is not how the program is made to be used. This is touted by the developer as a 'feature', but it is the most glaring indication that it is a note-taking application, rather than a serious writing tool. I deal with a multitude of different writing projects - from social media posts, through newsletter articles, to technical courses - and the *last* thing I want is to have all the texts from all my different clients and projects mixed into one big pile. Ulysses does have several filtering functions, that allow you to categorise and restrict the view of your documents, but that is basically forcing the user to jump through hoops to get the program to behave as if it were a document-based application (which it isn't). That "feature" alone means it's quite useless to me. I'm sadly disappointed at not being able to find a use for Ulysses in my writing toolbox. It does not have enough features to replace Scrivener as a writing-project manager, is not Markdown-compatible enough to replace a dedicated editor, and in the note-taking space there are more attractive and cheaper apps (with better Markdown support) - such as Write and TextNut. I hope the developers will decide which direction they wish to take the software, and invest on fine-tuning its features to suit that market, just as they fine-tuned its beautiful interface.
Like (2)
Version 2.2.1
saschafast
08 October 2015
My way to go for writing. I wish a LaTex-Export.
Like
Version 2.1.1
CDavid
26 August 2015
Ulysses is a great app for those who want to keep everything organised. Unlike most text editors, it lets search for particular part of your writing, edit what you've written previously with no effort at all. Moreover, I really like the sorting by time and the option that allows to display the document is different formats, for example, PDF or HTML etc. Well, the price could have been a bit lower, but to be honest, the app is totally worth its price.
Like (1)
Version 2.1.1
Simon3
30 May 2015
Excellent program! One big problem, considering I work with other MD and MMD applications, including Deckset, is that Ulysses' version of "extended" markdown does not follow what seems to be the main standard syntax (MMD). This takes it out of my workflow except for some basic note-taking. Please add MMD support.
Like (2)
Version 2.0.2
David1
21 April 2015
I've tinkered with many Markdown applications and have ultimately been dissatisfied with their shortcomings. Finally tried the Ulysses 2 demo after reading about all the improvements in the new version. Something clicked with it, so I took a deep breath and plunked down the $39.99 (sale price at the time) to buy it. Best move I've made in a long time. Ulysses solves most of my difficulties with Markdown input and output. I still have Scrivener, and it has a niche place in my workflow. I still have Mellel, and it, in conjunction with TextSoap, is my regex workhorse. But I now do most of my actual writing in Ulysses. People complain about the price of Ulysses. Scrivener and Mellel are about the same price. Nisus Writer Pro is more, and TextSoap (which I use a lot in rehabilitating third party texts) is not far behind. Price is usually commensurate with quality; irresponsible developers are, for the most part, easily recognizable. People complain about developer use of the Mac App Store. For many developers, this route provides the best overall return for their labor. Responsible developers provide a demo download on their website and a discount when a major new version comes out. The result is not much different from the traditional method. Bottom line: Of all the writing instruments I've looked into, tried, even bought, few of them even come close to Ulysses in either quality or utility. These guys work hard to make a product that not only works well, but works the way I want it to.
Like (1)
Version 2.0
1 answer(s)
dwp-1
dwp-1
26 April 2015
Very good point about the price of quality software. Sometimes you get what you pay for. There are so many app's on the App Store that come out at $4.99, they make a quick buck and then they never get updated again. It is very nearly impossible to market an app long term when you are selling it for five bucks.
Like (2)
Ksrhee24
18 April 2015
Version 2 is a fantastic update!
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Version 2.0
Teksestro
05 October 2014
"Write" app offers features that go well beyond "Ulysses" - such as support for tables, acces to the system media browser when inserting pics - for less than a QUARTER of the price. Ulysses' interface is nice, but that alone would not justify the price difference, even if both programs had equivalent feature lists. Both programs are geared towards SMALL writing projects. Serious authors who deal,with lengthy, varied and complex projects will need the superior file and project management tools offered by programs such as "Scrivener". Ulysses' approach of keeping all your texts from all your projects in a single database is nothing short of a nighmare, more suited to a note-taking application like Evernote than a serious writing tool.
Like (8)
Version 1.2.2
shuaiquan
23 July 2014
i like it!
Like
Version 1.2.1
Xenophile
21 June 2014
Ulysses is of the more innovative markdown text editors I've tried. The GUI is clean and elegant, the themes are great, and the general layout is logical. I tweaked a theme in user preferences to create what for me produced the least eye strain of any app I've ever used on a Mac. This fantastic writing environment is unmatched by any other app I've tried on a Mac, and I've been using Macs since the 1980s. Unfortunately, there is no way to integrate Ulysses into my document storage organization. Ulysses relies an on absurd storage scheme that buries it's document library in the user's hidden Home Library directory. A greater surprise awaits those who spelunk their Home directory to find the mystery Ulysses library (hidden at ~user/library/containers/com.soulmen.ulysses3/Data/Documents/Library/Groups-ulgroup/): the file names are meaningless alphanumeric gibberish! Want to save a markdown document in a project folder in your Documents directory? F-you. Want to back up that novel that's consumed the last 6 months of your life? F-you. Want to open a Ulysses document in another app? F-you. You're not competent to manage your own files, so F-you! What a disappointment. Maybe Ulysses IV will finally introduce the futuristic capability of saving files in any directory of the user's choice. Until then, there are other (free) markdown editors, and plenty of mature and refined writing apps (Scrivener).
Like (4)
Version 1.2.1
2 answer(s)
mickc3771
mickc3771
07 July 2014
Ok, Xenophile… at the left corner at bottom of the Ulysses window you'll find the + sign for adding new folder. At the bottom of that little popup menu "add external source" is the way to go. Create a sparse imagefile in Diskutility. The kind imagefile that can grow when you fill it up. Then point Ulysses to this sparseimagefile. You'll then get at headline in the left column of Ulsysses that says "External Source". Build a set of folders under that headline and start working adding sheets inside those folders. Use the sparseimage passwordprotected. Don't make any new documents outside the external source. If you want to use your own projectfolders in your user Document folder, fine point at any folder as an external source. The sparseimage route is a nice thing to protect your work. Easy to back up/move the imagefile itself too. Ulysses still points at the mounted imagefile on desktop. Doesn't matter where you move the imagefile itself. When you start the Ulysses it will automatically find it from the last place it was located (if not moved) and load the image – the password pop up appear in front of you and it will mount when given the password. Then Ulysses starts. You still need to make an export in any way to be able to read the documents outside Ulysses – that's the nature of the concept.
Like (2)
mickc3771
mickc3771
07 July 2014
Edit: It saves .txt files in the external folders. Can be read as is.
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Rochade
30 April 2014
Tried the demo and have to say I am impressed. But for me the price is too high for an elegant writing app (markdown composer). I would have instantly bought it if it was about half the price. btw: I wasn't able to add a similar app, as MU can't find it (even it is listed). The best alternative for me is Write. Still in beta but works without any problems: https://www.macupdate.com/app/mac/50080/write
Like (3)
Version 1.2
Cojacoo
20 January 2014
This app is just great - especially in combination with Deadalus. I do all my writing in there - from notes to paper drafts. Once you have it, you start wondering, why it has no built in IDE and stuff before you come back, that there can hardly be one app alone serving any task... But it goes a long way towards that. Thanks Soulmen.
Like
Version 1.1.2