MacMP3Gain
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(2) 2.25

AppleScript Studio GUI interface for mp3gain.   Free
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  • MacMP3Gain has been discontinued
  • Developer
    Bery Rinaldo
MacMP3Gain is an AppleScript Studio application which brings an Aqua GUI to the command line version of mp3gain, a utility that performs statistical analysis to determine how loud the MP3 file actually sounds to the human ear and performs lossless volume adjustments. MacMP3Gain is free and open source. You may download either the application itself or the entire project including the source code.

Important: MacMP3Gain modifies MP3 and unprotected AAC files. I would highly recommend a full backup of your MP3 library prior to running mp3gain on them.
What's New
Version 2.1:
  • Fixed mixed up Radio Gain Mode and Undo buttons.
  • Fixed progress tracking.
  • Built on Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard - should run on OS X 10.7 (untested).
Requirements
Intel/PPC, Mac OS X 10.3 or later

*Previously available here









  • iVolume
    +3
MacMP3Gain User Discussion (Write a Review)
ver. 2.x:
(2)
Your rating: Now say why...
Overall:
(6)

sort: smiles | time
burypromote
+1

+4

Olc reviewed on 02 Sep 2011
this application doesnt work. i compared to mp3gain for windows that i run in 10.6.8 thru crossover. with a target value of 92dB, it gives totally different results.
[Version 2.0]


burypromote

+1
Silversleeves commented on 14 May 2007
I know with burning to CDs:
DragonBurn still, as I have it "ironed in" to my prefs, runs its volume balancer on files "treated" with this software. In any other respect, DB4.x is Ok with the integrity of the files as MP3. Toast 6, however, tends to want to decompress the MP3s if I process them under Album Gain with no target dB. T6T is fine with Radio Gain-balanced files however. I just recently installed Toast 7, but haven't seen if the same quirk persists.

Altogether a nice product. I remember using both an earlier version and its Windows twin, and this one, though the GUI isn't as fancy, impresses me more than both with its stability and effectiveness. It's certainly easier and more fool- and user-proof than running Normalize-MP3 in the CLI.

Silversleeves
[Version 1.9]


burypromote
-1

-1
microguy commented on 02 Sep 2006
It broke all my mp3 :( all it do is to make no audio in all my mp3. S***t!
[Version 1.9]


burypromote

+5
Ned Anderson commented on 24 Apr 2006
It would be wise to work on copies and compare to the original. I've had cases where a couple of songs were totally wiped, as in no sound at all. I mean the file was all there just no sound or volume. It's only happened a couple of times but it's worth quickly running through the tracks in iTunes or whatever and just make sure they are all audible. You only need to hear the first few second to confirm if yiu can hear it.
[Version 1.9]


burypromote
+1

+1

Delysid reviewed on 01 Mar 2006
This is an essential tool for being able to play all you mp3's without ever having to rush over and adjust the volume. It's amazing how much more enjoyable this makes the listening experience -- the songs somehow just sound "better" when their volumes are properly balanced with mp3gain. Forget alternatives like mp3 Rage, or iTunes "Sound Check" features, or others I can't remember the names of right now. Only mp3gain properly implements the ReplayGain model for adjusting relative volume of tracks to all have as closely as possible the same subjective perceived loudness. It applies psychoacoustic principles, chiefly a curve corresponding to varying human senstivitity to loudness at different frequencies, i.e. sounds roughly in the speech range of frequencies sound louder to us, that is we're more sensitive to them, than sounds further above or below this range. Anyway the long and short is that no other volume balancing solution on the Mac or Windows does as good a job (and I've tried lots). But note that you have to process each sound file before playing, which means setting mp3gain loose on your whole computer music library, letting it chug away for a few hours, and then every new track right away put it through mp3gain, or it will probably sound WAY TOO LOUD. The ReplayGaing model used by mp3gain will make most of your tracks quite a bit quieter, but that is to allow for tracks that actually do need the full dynamic range this leaves available. Trust me, it works extremely well on all types of music, allowing you to mix your punk and metal favourite tracks with acoustic folk, jazz, and ambient electronica and play the whole mix without having to touch the volume.

I only gave it 4 stars because (a) the Windows equivalent displays a scrollable display showing what adjustments were made to each track, which can be saved as a log, making it much easier to figure out if you have already processed a track; and (b) sometimes mp3gain won't process a track the first time through, for reasons I can't figure out, so if a track still sounds distinctly too loud, you may have to run it through mp3gain again ALTHOUGH this is based on my experience with version 1.8. I haven't tried 1.9 yet (am just about to install it).

Mega=thanks to the developer for updating the program. Now if only someone would produce a Mac version of WaveGain, which lets you apply the same adjustments to WAV files on a PC, essential for creating mix CD's -- also much finer grained adjustments can be done with WAV (or AIFF) files, since mp3's are limited by their nature to increments of 1.5 dB. Which is good enough for general listening, but sometimes not quite fine enough. Meantime I use Virtual PC to apply WaveGain to WAV tracks before I burn them to a mix CD -- a hassle but worth the trouble.
[Version 1.9]


burypromote


Anonymous reviewed on 25 Aug 2005
For me it works with iTunes IF you switch of the iTunes Volume Normalisation feature, because this overrides the normalization of MP3 Gain.
The iTunes normalization features writes iTunes own normalization value in the comments of the MP3 Files and iTunes will adjust the volume accordingly to this value.
[Version 1.9]


burypromote


Anonymous reviewed on 12 Mar 2004
I still find that Mp3 Rage's 'volume adjuster' works better then this. It allows you to pick a reference file to adjust match the other files to which I personally prefer. It's also MUCH faster. I don't know what method rage uses, but I do know the resulting files seem pretty consistent sounding. I can't say the same for this. This is free which is great, but I just don't find it does a very good job.
[Version 1.8]


burypromote


Anonymous reviewed on 20 Jan 2004
Remember everyone, this is a quick-and-dirty front end to a command line app which has MUCH more functionality. Check it out at

http://sourceforge.net/projects/mp3gain/
[Version 1.8]


burypromote


Anonymous reviewed on 30 Apr 2003
slow slow slow, even on 800 MHz iMac w/ oodles of RAM. No progress monitor that is meaningful. No way to resume if you interrupt the batch normalization of song volumes. Overall didn't clobber my music collection, but I was not stunned with either this app's speed or completeness of interface. It is free after all, and the author is to be commended for addressing a chronic and pervasive problem when you accumulate lots of MP3s from varying sources.

dan
[Version 1.6]


There are currently no troubleshooting comments. If you are experiencing a problem with this app, please post a comment.


Ric Koba rated on 08 Jun 2013

[Version 2.1]



MacMolle rated on 28 Mar 2013

[Version 2.1]


Downloads:19,149
Version Downloads:3,516
Type:Multimedia Design : MP3
License:Free
Date:22 Dec 2011
Platform:PPC 32 / Intel 32 / OS X
Price:Free0.00
Overall (Version 2.x):
Features:
Ease of Use:
Value:
Stability:
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MacMP3Gain is an AppleScript Studio application which brings an Aqua GUI to the command line version of mp3gain, a utility that performs statistical analysis to determine how loud the MP3 file actually sounds to the human ear and performs lossless volume adjustments. MacMP3Gain is free and open source. You may download either the application itself or the entire project including the source code.

Important: MacMP3Gain modifies MP3 and unprotected AAC files. I would highly recommend a full backup of your MP3 library prior to running mp3gain on them.


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