Stormchild

  • Smile Score: +387
  • Posts: 63
  • Downloads: 13
Your MacUpdate.com profile avatar
About Me
Member Type I am a Free member
Visit Stats
Last Visit 24 days ago Member Since Oct 13, 2008

Stormchild's Recent Posts

Stormchild
+9

Quite frankly, OF2 is a turd. Instead of addressing the many workflow problems that make OF a chore to use, all they've really done is a makeover, and unfortunately it's mostly for the worse. Everything is spaced out way too much, and the style settings are completely removed, so you can't do a damn thing about it. The window no longer fits on one half of my 13" Air display (OmniOutliner uses the other half, and I've used them that way for years), and I now see less than half as many tasks as I did before. In short, there's no way I can use this crippled, superficial makeover, nor can I recommend it to anyone. Swing and a miss.

Reply0 replies
Version 2.0
Stormchild
+0

Sorry for the duplicate review. The review panel was throwing an error on submit.

Reply0 replies
Version 1.9.0
Stormchild
+0

Indispensable tool for managing both Git and Mercurial repos with a consistent UI. Surprising that it's free, especially given the constant stream of fixes and improvements. No matter how good you are with the git and hg command line tools, this makes it easier to browse and compare changes across any range of commits. Every day I use this to review all my changes, catch things I missed, and update my dev notes before committing.

Reply0 replies
Version 1.9.0
Stormchild
+0

Indispensable tool for managing both Git and Mercurial repos with a consistent UI. Surprising that it's free, especially given the constant stream of fixes and improvements. No matter how good you are with the git and hg command line tools, this makes it easier to browse and compare changes across any range of commits. Every day I use this to review all my changes, catch things I missed, and update my dev notes before committing.

Reply0 replies
Version 1.9.0
ShadyShadyReview
Stormchild
+0

Finally, a way to dim my MacBook Air below the lowest brightness setting (without screwing up all the colors like f.lux does). I've been trying to find something like this forever. Most of the other ones are old and broken. This one actually works, and works well.

Reply0 replies
Version 1.0.3
Stormchild
+0

This is great, when it works, but it's gotten really buggy lately. Rearranging icons is quite difficult; they flicker back and forth and often don't stay where you put them. Hope all the wrinkles are ironed out soon. I have tons of menubar doodads and this is really the only way to manage them (other than just turning most of them off and accepting the fact that you can't rearrange most 3rd party menus).

Reply1 reply
Version 1.2.11
Stormchild
+0

Follow-up: on my other Mac, I'm able to move my icons around without any of the problems I described above. It could be the graphics card, or it might be because I'm running dual displays. The glitchy one: MacBook Pro (late 2008) GeForce 9600M (256 MB) External 1920x1080 display The one that works fine: MacBook Air (mid 2012) Intel HD Graphics 4000 No external monitor Perhaps I'll give it a whirl next time my newer Mac is connected to an external display and see what happens then.

Stormchild
+0

Despite the claim of Mavericks compatibility, LaunchBar 5.6 still has a couple of issues with the new OS. Specifically, when "Displays have separate Spaces" is enabled (which it is by default)… - When a full screen app is active, opening something with LaunchBar causes the display with the full screen app to switch to another space, for no apparent reason (even when launching an app that exists only on the other display). This really wrecks the workflow of having full screen apps exist in their own independent space. - LaunchBar always appears on the "main" display, even when both displays have a menubar and the other display has the active menubar. It should follow the active menubar. Even summoning the Dock to the other display has no effect on LaunchBar. Kind of defeats the purpose of having a menubar on both monitors if LaunchBar remains stuck to a specific screen. Looks like not much testing was done on multiple monitor setups. Not exactly dealbreakers, but both of these issues have spoiled the multiple monitor support in Mavericks, which was the #1 reason I upgraded. For now I've had to revert to the old behavior where the spaces for each monitor are tied together, which is a bit of a bummer.

Reply1 reply
Version 5.6
Stormchild
+0

Indeed! These guys are amazing. I don't have a second display to test with at the moment, but hopefully everything is sorted out now.

Stormchild
+2

Works in Mavericks…sort of. I can't rearrange the icons anymore (attempting to command-drag an icon causes all the adjacent ones to freak out; sometimes after the dust settles, the one I dragged does move, but it's pretty much random and unusable). Switching to another user causes the Bartender bar to appear halfway off the left edge of the screen, and at that point it can no longer be moved until I quit and restart the app. When a second display is connected and the new "Displays have separate Spaces" setting is enabled, one of the two displays has an odd gap in the menubar icons. If I click the gap, it disappears, but then it reappears in the same place on the other menubar. Looks like Bartender has some 10.9 bugs that still need to be worked out.

Reply0 replies
Version 1.2.9
Stormchild
+2

I've been using this on the trial for a couple weeks now. Also tried MacProxy and ProxyCap, each of which has its strengths, but I ended up settling on Proxifier because of the following features: Most powerful rules. It's the only one that lets you specify multiple hostnames in a single rule. As an example, in order to enable iCloud at work, I have to redirect *.icloud.com, *.akamaiedge.com, and *.akadns.com through the proxy. You could just create multiple rules in the other apps, but I prefer having them grouped together. Rule sets. Proxifier lets you save and easily switch between sets of rules. ProxyCap will save and load rules, but not in a convenient way, and MacProxy doesn't have rule sets at all. If you need to set up different rules for different networks, this is indispensable. No need to restart after installing, and unlike the other two, it doesn't have a process that runs in the background when you're not using it. It's just a standalone app that only needs to be open when you're actually using it. I docked a couple points for Ease of Use for two reasons: - Doesn't manage SSH tunnels. You have to go start your tunnel manually every time, restart it if it gets interrupted, and close it when you're done with it. It's not hard to do, but it would still be much nicer if all I had to do is open this app and let it take care of everything. - Crummy interface. The UI is ugly and un-Mac-like, but more importantly, it's weird and confusing. The main window toolbar has links to the config panels (each of which opens the config window and goes directly to a specific page). The config window has an almost identical toolbar, but in this context, the exact same buttons switch between views in the same window. For some reason, the Rules window is non-resizable, which is just plain silly. Once you've got 8 rules, they can no longer fit within the window. The order of rules matters, so sometimes you need to move them up and down, but drag & drop isn't supported, so you have to use crummy up/down arrows. It's like using a primitive web UI from 10 years ago. Editing a proxy or rule opens yet another window, and this one is modal, so it blocks the rest of the UI until you close it. The app's "Preferences" menu item just opens the same configuration window. The "DNS" and "Advanced" sections are preferences, but the "Proxies" and "Rules" sections are not, and it's all mixed together, as the developer doesn't seem to understand the difference. In short, the UI is just not very well designed, and needs a lot of work to make it friendlier. I would probably not recommend this to non-tech-savvy friends, but for those of who are comfortable using the command line and working with SSH, this is definitely the most powerful app of its kind.

Reply0 replies
Version 2.11.2
ButlerButlerReview
Stormchild
+2

LaunchBar is my quick launcher of choice (has been for over ten years), but Butler has proven to be a worthy companion. I don't use the abbreviation or search features at all, but there are a number of other features I find really valuable (which no other app seems to provide). Here are a few of the things I use it for: - I've set up hotkeys (F1-F6) that open pop-up menus in the Finder, letting me quickly get to a specific file or folder. If I hold command and hit the same key, it opens the folder directly instead of the pop-up menu. - Shortcuts for rating the current song in iTunes. Shift + [numpad 0-5]. Butler is one of the only apps that can actually distinguish between the regular number keys and the number pad. Obviously shift + regular number wouldn't work, as I'd lose access to a bunch of symbols. - Other iTunes hotkeys: play/pause, next track, previous track. I used to have these in the menubar as well (I think that was even the original reason I started using Butler), but I have a menubar doodad problem, so I don't have space for those anymore. - Hotkeys for menus in apps where custom shortcuts often don't work. There are a number of situations where custom hotkeys set up in System Preferences → Keyboard Shortcuts don't work until the menu has been opened at least once. Needless to say, this is an unacceptable hassle. What I do now is set up the hotkey I want in Butler, and just have Butler type the default hotkey for me. Works every time. The other thing this works well for is menu commands whose name changes. For example, instead of setting up two identical shortcuts for iTunes' "Switch to MiniPlayer" and "Switch from MiniPlayer" commands in System Preferences, I can just set up *one* hotkey in Butler, and don't even have to bother typing the command name at all. Also has the advantage of leaving the original shortcuts intact, which is helpful if someone else is using your Mac. Finally, because you can specify multiple apps for a hotkey, you can set up shortcuts that work in multiple apps. I've got a "Toggle Web Inspector" hotkey that types cmd-shift-i in Safari, WebKit, Chrome, and Firefox, and it does the right thing in all of them. -- Anyway, my point is that Butler does a lot of things really well, and if you explore its features, you can probably find a bunch of uses for it, even if you aren't using it as a quick search/launcher.

Reply0 replies
Version 4.1.15