5
Thank you for your review
Free
Check Failed Password Attempts has been discontinued
Email me when discounted: 

Check Failed Password Attempts is a small application that parses the /var/log/secure.log file looking for failed authorization attempts. It presents a summary of the total number of failed attempts (and successes) per user. It will also optionally display the full log listing of each failed attempt, each successful attempt, and SSH information from the /var/log/system.log (see the preferences to enable/disable these options).

This application is based on tips submitted to www.macintouch.com. See the MacInTouch report on more...

What's New

Version 0.1.9:
  • Improved compatibility with Mac OS X 10.4.3 (Tiger).
  • Minor interface adjustments.

Requirements

Mac OS X 10.2 or later, Admin access.

*Previously available here

Similar Software

Open Comparison
Suggest Other Similar Software
Leave a Review

Check Failed Password Attempts User Discussion

Nobody has reviewed or commented on this app yet. Add your own comment and get a discussion going!
Sort by: Time | Smiles
smactron Member IconReview+76
smactron
+1

Will this ever be updated as a universal binary? I hope so!

Also, is there a way to get it to show what the incorrect password attempts were? I'd like to see what others tried as my password and what I typed when I mis-typed my password.

Reply0 replies
Version 0.1.9
Anonymous Member IconReview
Anonymous
+0

Same mac mini user 10.3.8 version 0.1.7 now works thank you very much

Reply0 replies
Version 0.1.7
Anonymous Member IconReview
Anonymous
+0

mac mini os x 10.3.8 gets an error variable 0 not defined then quits.....

Reply0 replies
Version 0.1.6
Anonymous Member IconReview
Anonymous
+0

No, this says it is related to what's on Macintouch, which is specifically discussing remote attacks and attempts to compromise the machine that way.

There is NO security if someone can sit at the computer. They can reboot and use single user mode if you don't have an open firmware password set (the vast majority don't), or they can simply take the drive - easy in most towers.

No, tools like this are only useful for remote security, and there is no point to this if root is disabled.

Reply2 replies
Version 0.1.5
Anonymous Member Icon
Anonymous
+0

I call BS on you.

Just because root is disabled doesn't mean there aren't 20 or so other user accounts on the machine that can't be attacked, most of which could be used maliciously if compromised.

Heaven forbid anyone would try to do the general ignorant masses a service, though. Of course, you probably like the security-through-obscurity paradigm, as it placates the ignorant masses while allowing you to crack their computers.

cl

Anonymous Member Icon
Anonymous
+0

I call BS *and* flat-out ignorance on you.

None of the other accounts have shell access, so they aren't vulnerable to attempted logins. The only account other than root that has a shell is your user account. User accounts cannot be easily predicted and thus are not generally subject to attack.

So, root is disabled, user accounts are unpredictable, and all other users have no shell access. This is NOT about security through obscurity, this is simply called "no avenues to attack". What's next, ports that aren't opened are subject to attack? "Oh no, there's over 65,000 holes that attackers could use RIGHT NOW! Run for the hills!" This makes just as much sense.

Go read the post on www.unsanity.org and educate yourself about the issue.

Anonymous Member IconReview
Anonymous
+0

I like it, the name "Herr Anonymous".

Some folks just do not get it. They smell stupidity in their own socks.

have a day.

Bob.

Reply0 replies
Version 0.1.5
Anonymous Member IconReview
Anonymous
+0

Herr Anonymous says the computer is safe as long as root is not enabled. What if someone were to sit at the keyboard and attempt to type in one's password. The failed attempts would show. That's the goal of this program

Reply0 replies
Version 0.1.5
Anonymous Member IconReview
Anonymous
+0

Program failed with "Can't make word 2 of " 1 " into a Unicode text."

10.3.8 - dual 800MHz Quicksilver

Hmm...

Reply0 replies
Version 0.1.1
Anonymous Member IconReview
Anonymous
+0

This is a cool app and perhaps some form of secure.log should be included in Console by Apple. You get the feeling that Apple want to pretend that nothing untoward ever happens to Macs, for instance the lack of logging by ipfw in it's default state and no way of adequately configuring it via Apple's sharing GUI. You can find out the hard way that enabling AFP file sharing or remote login also makes your computer available across the entire internet not just your local network. Very uncool Apple not to be able to change that via the GUI.

Anyway, this app is interesting, I don't know the security implications of being able to view secure.log, although it didn't show actual passwords themselves via this app just login names and times (they all seemed to be my own anyway when I mistyped a password), but I think this is quite handy.

Reply2 replies
Version 0.1
Anonymous Member Icon
Anonymous
+0

You can view security.log in console.app

Anonymous Member Icon
Anonymous
+0

It's not in Console's var/log for me (10.3.7), if I find secure.log in the Finder then specify I want to open it in Console it just comes up blank, presumbably because I don't have permissions to view it.

Anonymous Member IconReview
Anonymous
+0

i like the program, but could it have a slightly more interesting name?

Reply2 replies
Version 0.1
Anonymous Member Icon
Anonymous
+0

Any suggestions?

Anonymous Member Icon
Anonymous
+0

'Unauthorized'?

Anonymous Member IconReview
Anonymous
+0

Fun to see what people think your password is.

Reply2 replies
Version 0.1
Anonymous Member Icon
Anonymous
+0

At least my /var/log/secure.log doesn't contain any passwords listed, not even for failed attempts, which is only logical because if this log showed it, it would also show small typos of real password, and all the big attempts of making it secure in /etc/passwd and through shadow passwords etc. would be void.

So please tell me how to get the fun to know what other people think my password is???

Anonymous Member Icon
Anonymous
+0

I would like to know, too.

There are no Ratings for this App yet.
> 5 5

Ratings

Overall
(5)
Current Version (0.x)
(5)

Details

Downloads 5,365
Version Downloads 2,356
License Free
Date 02 Nov 2005
Platform OS X / PPC 32
Price Free